View Full Version : Character Letter to the Federal Judge


NicknBree
09-26-2005, 10:19 AM
How many of you wrote a letter to the Judge regarding your loved one prior to sentencing? Our attorney suggested that it couldn't hurt although I'm not sure how much it will help. What did you include in your letter? Any ideas/suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
~Bree~

FreedomSeeker
09-26-2005, 01:33 PM
Prior to Booker, such letters were a nice touch but judges have very little discretion is sentencing for it to matter much beyond where in the range to sentence. Post-Booker, I personally believe character letters are a must. With the increase in judicial discretion, the creation of a personality profile can only help.

TxRhino
09-26-2005, 02:22 PM
I wrote a letter to the Judge prior to my wife's sentence and can tell you I am damn glad I did. Did it help? Who Knows. But I felt better for doing so.

As to the content... I suggest you keep it short and sweet and stick to the facts. As the spouse of a convicted felon.... you are expected to be in love and see only the best in you mate; however, if you can give example of community involvement and site reasons why your community is a better place with your convicted spouse there, instead being away, this may help. Wasting space saying things like "don't send them away because I love them" serves no purpose. Give specific examples of the good deeds you are involved in, church involvement, vollunteer groups, even self improvement programs like drug rehab, AA,... etc. Keep it short, keep it honest, and most of all...

Keep the Faith

Michael :thumbsup:

coping
09-26-2005, 04:50 PM
We did lots of quality letters, the judge told us he read them all, they ranged from 1 - 3 pages each. He even said these letters ( held them up) made a big impact on my decison today. These letters told him the person he really was before drugs came in his life, and hopefully the person he will become again when this is all behind him, only better. I say DO IT, it can't hurt anything, the more the better, but get quality. A few close family members and a friend or two, former boss(es), co workers, preacher, respected people in the community that knew him well, we even had a former senator write a letter that actually wrote the "drug" laws for Mississippi, etc. . I wrote a long thread about this about a year ago.

Lillybee
09-26-2005, 05:57 PM
I wrote a letter to the judge prior to my son's sentencing. I had to add my 2 cents. I wanted the judge to know what my son was like before all of this mess and to let the Court know that my son had people who cared about him, etc. I don't know if it mattered. I know the judge read the letter though.

CSW
09-26-2005, 06:06 PM
Waste of time and paper...has no bearing on the issues or case.

Cinammo
09-26-2005, 06:31 PM
Actually character letters can have a bearing on a decision by judge. It is not a waste of paper. It depends on the case.

cjjack
09-26-2005, 07:05 PM
It does have a bearing on the case, Cinammo is correct. It can make a perosn more "real" to the Court.

Janelle
09-26-2005, 11:59 PM
We feel that the letters sent to the judge before my husband's recent sentencing definitely helped! In our case, we also wanted our friends and family, who felt helpless through much of the process, be able to have a voice in the proceedings. When the time came to start collecting letters, we gave copies to the following to everyone concerned:

To our family and friends:

As most of you know, ***** has accepted a plea agreement on a federal charge. His sentencing will take place on September 22. The sentencing guidelines suggest *** years in a federal prison, which could be anywhere in the country. Hopefully, he will be allowed to self-surrender, which means he will not actually have to leave for 30 days after sentencing. If you don’t know the details of his case and would like more information, please ask. We will be happy to share.

Many of you have asked what you can do to help. We have replied that we will let you know when the time comes. Well, that time is now! Here is what we are asking of you:

1. First and foremost, please earnestly pray for the best possible resolution. God can and does work miracles! We also know that God has a plan for us and it might include ***** entering the “mission field” of a federal prison for a little while.

2. If you feel comfortable doing so, we ask that you write a letter to the federal judge who will be deciding his sentence. In this letter please describe your relationship to *****, what you know of the changes in his life, whether you consider him to be an asset to the community and anything else you feel is appropriate. This letter should be addressed to The Honorable ****Judge's Name****, U.S. District Judge. The letter can be sent directly to ****’s attorney, ****attorney's name and address**** or you may give it to us and we will send it to her. (In fact, we would love to see a copy of your letter if you feel comfortable sharing it with us.) The goal of your letter to the judge is for **** to receive the shortest possible sentence and to be allowed to self-surrender. Please note that ****’s full name is *****.

3. Continue to pray for and be emotionally supportive of our family if it is decided that **** spend time in prison. ***** will have his address and information on mail regulations. Every letter he receives while he is gone is a wonderful gift. This will be a very difficult time for our family. Knowing that we have your love and support will make a positive difference during our separation.

Please let us know if you have any thoughts or questions. We cannot thank you enough for the difference each of you has made in our life. We love and appreciate every one of you.

Sincerely,

dizzulsgirl
09-27-2005, 12:29 AM
I agree with what has been said; character letters help a lot. I had a couple written for me and so did my baby. In both of our cases I believe it helped a lot.

De De - OKC
09-27-2005, 12:49 AM
This was really timely - thanks! Our son Michael goes for sentencing Oct 26. (Prayers requested and appreciated)

Annie-Doll
09-27-2005, 11:13 AM
We had people write letters before my husband was sentenced and I do not believe it helped in his situation. In my opinion the judge had his mind made up before he even read the letters. That does not mean however that it might not help in other situations. I say write the letters, it certainly will not hurt. Good luck and May God Bless You and Your Family. Stay strong and keep praying. God does answer our prayers.

April07
09-27-2005, 03:34 PM
Whether or not character letters make a difference depends upon the judge solely - I agree with Anne, our judge had made up his mind before sentencing and I'm not sure he even read the letters. Same thing in my custody case...

frmbeliever
09-28-2005, 09:26 PM
I had character letters written prior to my son's sentencing and the judge actually said " according to his character letters it seems to me this is a young man that has made some bad choices. I got letters fromhis high school coach, his professors in college my Pastor and friends and family. It does not hurt and when he recieves his PSI his character letters were attached and when my son read than he knew he was not alone. Keep praying and Remember God has a plan.


Hebrews 13:3

blessing_six
09-29-2005, 10:47 AM
My family and I wrote quality letters to the judge and my son said the judge did say it helped him, but I guess its depends on the judge!

bellisq
10-01-2005, 09:47 AM
All this advice that has been offered is great. I would add 2 suggestions: Don't compare the case to any others (how somebody who did something worse got short time) and don't tell the judge what to do. They know why you are writing. Letters definitely can make a difference.

freegene
10-03-2005, 10:47 AM
The judge never read the 50+ letters for my husband. She did hold them up and said they will be going in the packet to the appeallate court. I think it depends on the court AND the judge. I didn't want to write a letter but I felt better after I wrote it. I hope you aren't in Florida. Good luck!

April07
10-03-2005, 01:48 PM
freegene - you may have hit the nail on the head there. Sometimes writing the letter is the most therapeutic thing we can do - put down why you believe in your loved one and why others should as well. Even if the judge doesn't read it, it is reassuring to yourself and others who might.

marcsgirl
10-04-2005, 04:55 PM
I can tell you my Judge read and felt the letters from my friends family and associates were all warm and heartfelt- he was impressed with each of them and quoted from some. My lawyer however was an idiot and did not do enough to individualize me in his motions and responses- BOTH REALLY COUNT! Good luck and God bless.

BoredGoat
10-06-2005, 11:29 PM
Myself, along with Glenn's father and two sisters, along with a friend of mine wrote letters to the judge. At his sentencing, he made mention that he had read all the letters that had come in, and pointed out the one I had written, saying that he felt *sad* that I would also have to suffer for Glenn's actions. I'm not sure if all the letters as a whole helped, but they definetly didn't damage the situation either. I do think they could have been taken into more consideration, but who am I?:confused: Just be sure to elaborate on the GOOD things about the person, and keep going in that direction, and you surely can't go wrong:D

Geek
10-09-2005, 11:27 PM
First of all, letters make a huge difference. The defendants own letter is extremely important. I believe the defendant should make themselves sound like they believe they are a piece of trash, appalled that they did something so "horrible." Many lawyers recommended such an attitude and it worked very well.

When collecting letters, I instructed each person to follow some directions then call my attorney. My attorney worked with each letter writer to edit their letters and tailor them for my judge. My attorney briefly explained to me a letter that made a big impact on a judge for a previous client. In this letter, the defendants mother writes to the judge and explains how he is a gentle and caring person (convicted of bank robbery, trying to counter act the violent image of a bank rober). She went on to tell a short story of how they were together on a road trip and he saw an accident on the side of the road where many people had already stopped. The defendant did not keep going assuming it was taken care of, he needed to be certain for himself and do anything he could to help, so he stopped and did just that. My attorney believes the more personal letters are like this, the more effective they will be. This story doesn't apply to your situation, but I am sure there are many that do.

With my request to each letter writer, I included the following memo:

1 LAW OFFICES OF
[edited out law firm and contact info]






M E M O R A N D U M




TO: ALL LETTER WRITERS
FROM: [edited out attorney name]
DATE: February 8, 2005
RE: [edited out my name]



THIS MEMO IS INTENDED TO SERVE AS A GUIDELINE FOR ALL PERSONS WRITING TO JUDGE [edited out judge name] ON BEHALF OF [edited out my name]. WHAT FOLLOWS IS MERELY A SUGGESTION AND NOT INTENDED AS A FORM. YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE MORE A LETTER DISCUSSES [edited out my name]’S UNIQUE QUALITIES AND YOUR INDIVIDUAL KNOWLEDGE OF HIM, THE MORE VALUABLE IT WILL BE.
LETTERS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED BUT NOT SENT TO:
[edited out judge's name]
UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
[edited out district and address]

ALL LETTERS SHOULD BE DELIVERED AS SOON AS POSSIBLE DIRECTLY TO:

[edited out attorney's name and address]


THE LETTERS SHOULD CONTAIN THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:


First ¶ INTRODUCE YOURSELF, GIVING A BRIEF STATEMENT OF WHO YOU ARE AND WHAT YOU DO.


Second ¶ TELL GENERALLY HOW YOU BECAME ACQUAINTED WITH [edited out my name], HOW LONG YOU HAVE KNOWN HIM AND IN WHAT CAPACITY.


Third ¶ RELATE ANY PERSONAL KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCES RELATING TO THE MANNER IN WHICH HE TAKES RESPONSIBILITY FOR AND/OR CARES FOR OTHERS. SPECIFIC FIRST HAND EXAMPLES YOU MAY BE ABLE TO OFFER ARE THE BEST, INCLUDING EXAMPLES OF SELFLESSNESS, COMPASSION, CHARITYABLENESS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY


Fourth ¶ RELATE THAT YOU ARE AWARE THAT HE WAS CHARGED WITH AND HAS PLEAD GUILTY TO A CRIME. RELATE HOW THIS CASE HAS IMPACTED UPON HIM AND ASK THAT THE COURT EXERCISE LENIENCY ON HIS BEHALF.


REMEMBER [edited out my name] HAS ALREADY PLED GUILTY TO THE OFFENSE FOR WHICH HE IS CHARGED AND IS BEING GIVEN CONSIDERATION FOR ACCEPTING RESPONSIBILITY FOR HIS ACTIONS. PLEASE DO NOT IN ANY WAY CLAIM [edited out my name] IS NOT GUILTY OR COULDN’T BE GUILTY OF THE OFFENSE WHICH HE IS BEING SENTENCED. THIS WILL ONLY SERVE TO DIMINISH HIS ACTION IN ACCEPTING RESPONSIBILITY FOR HIS CONDUCT. YOU MAY INDICATE, IF YOU BELIEVE IT TO BE TRUE, THAT THIS OFFENSE WAS OUT OF CHARACTER FOR HIM AND THAT HE HAS LIVED (IF YOU KNOW) AN OTHERWISE LAW ABIDING LIFE, ETC.


NB THE MORE PERSONAL AND LESS “BOILERPLATE” THE LETTER IS, THE MORE IMPACT IT WILL HAVE.

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, OR WOULD LIKE MORE GUIDANCE IN PREPARING YOUR LETTER,
PLEASE DO NOT HESITATE TO CALL [edited out attorney name and phone number]

Geek
10-09-2005, 11:29 PM
I want stress that a good letter will come if you think about the four points in the memo and be sure to address each aspect they discuss.

InLuvWithD
10-09-2005, 11:38 PM
my family and I also wrote letters for my husband, and also very close friends of ours and his boss (who says he will keep his job for him til he comes home) bless his heart. The judge told my husband that he received all the letters and it looks like he is lucky to have so much support. Now, my husband gets sentenced Oct 12th so I am anxious to see just how good that support did when it comes time for him to be sentenced...Like most said it can't hurt...

kristalynn01
10-09-2005, 11:43 PM
I also wrote a letter to the judge prior to sentencing. In it I told him about my husband's character as a human being, as opposed to the way he was going to be portrayed in court. I acknowledged that he had made a mistake, that he was ashamed for what he had done and that we both knew he had to "pay his debt". But I also asked for leniency. During the sentencing, the judge mentioned my letter, said that he was impressed with what I had written and told my husband he wished he didn't have to impose the mandatory minimum sentence that he did because he truly felt he could and would be a productive member of the community. Even though he imposed the mandatory minimum at that time, his lawyer filed a "rule 35" motion and the judge cut his time in half. So I'd like to believe the letter made a bit of difference after all.

jelly belly
10-10-2005, 06:04 PM
I think letters help a great deal. I wish I would've received supervised release, but I did receive a downward departure of 6 months down to 18 months due in part to the letters. I think I had about 10 letters and my attorney narrowed it down to 5 that he sent to the judge. I had to write my wife's letter because she wouldn't write it, but I wanted the judge to think I had some assemblance of a family life. My others were from a former boss, two pastors a lifelong friend and a doctor. I included pictures of my boys as well - perhaps that made an impression.

I sent some of the letters directly to the judge because I thought my attorney waited too long to include it in his sentencing position report - I could be wrong or right.

Good luck and God's grace to you.

offthegrid
10-17-2005, 04:12 PM
Judges do have some discretion now so it is possible that letters, work records, anything to show that this was a one time bad choice may mitigate the sentence - if there is no prior criminal record. I believe that a prior criminal record tends to put everything in a bad light.

Good luck to your son at sentencing.

not_unrealistic
12-06-2005, 01:55 PM
Post-booker, I think that letters are a MUST. I read in somewhere that OUR judge was quoted saying that letters make a huge difference to him and in a post-booker world, they can help you to get less time.

somissingmylove
12-11-2005, 01:27 PM
I wrote a letter to the Judge before my boyfriend got sentenced about what a good man and a good father he was. I don't know if the letter helped but his sentencing range was min. of 180 months and he got exactly 180 months. I know regardless of wether it helped or not, I'm glad I wrote it.:)

wench
12-18-2005, 10:42 PM
Jim was arrested in January. I wrote a letter in July, about the same time as the PSR (coincidence). When the judges assistant called here at the beginning of the month to tell me that a sentencing date had been set for this month, I composed another letter. A very nice person HERE helped me edit out some things and stick to facts, spoken lovingly.

I spoke about how long I've known him, how we met, what contributions he's made to my family life, to me personally, good deeds to me, others and to the community (volunteering with two charities). I spoke of his work ethic... I knew about this because DH worked w/ him TWICE. The second time it was Jim that got DH the job...out of this terrible job market and making double what he was. The PSI writer actually told me to stress his support system (me, NA, friends) and I sent copies of the group on Sisters (Nuns) and lay-people who were praying for him.... and a photocopy of him at work with the entire team.

I'll find out if it helped when he's sentenced. I have a post up about this asking about his sentencing date. I'll let you know what happens.

Yes, I DO believe letters help....and YES I also believe it depends on the judge. THIS particular judge's assistant simply says that this judge reads EVERYTHING very carefully. Sounds good to me.

Thanks,

Doni

Federal PO
01-02-2006, 01:56 PM
All of the Judges I have worked for take the time to read all letters sent to them.

Juris Doctor
01-02-2006, 05:56 PM
My husband and I, former attys were sentenced in Oct this year and our judge read all of the character letters - even stopped the sentencing hearing so my husband could go to his car to get some that his atty failed to turn in to the judge.
we both found that they were essential - we were sentenced in the Middle District of Florida by the Judge that handled the Terry Schiavo case

NYCandbeyond
02-28-2006, 11:39 PM
this is a copy of a letter I wrote for one friend, his judge didn't seem to care, they had numerous letters, and even a petition over 200 people had signed, but that is how commonwealth states, or his judge is, I guess. I have also heard it helps to keep writing the judge after sentencing, as ultimately they are the person in charge of a sentence reduction in the future

Honorable Judge *&^*$*(,

My name is __________ I am writing you today on behalf of _________, who is scheduled to appear in your court for sentencing on April ____, 200_.
I have known ________ for over five years; he has been the big brother that I never had; Always willing to listen, always willing to help. When I learned of his incarcerated I was stunned, as he is such a positive person, and I have never known him of conducting himself in a negative manner, or contributing to unproductive, non-positive activities. If you did not know two weeks before _________ arrest one of his life long dreams of launching his own ___________ came to fulfillment prior to his arrest this business had been the main focus of his energy and he was working to further promote its circulation.
I cannot debate with you the legitimacy of the allegations that he is being charged with, I can only tell you that he is a good person, an intelligent and driven man, and by no means a danger to society.
I respectfully ask you to take these words into consideration when sentencing him, I ask that your sentence be merciful and not punitive, and that you take into account all the people whose lives he has touched who will consequently miss him, and especially how his absence will affect the lives of his young children.

Sincerely,


Me
Friend of inmate

SIfiance
03-05-2006, 06:02 PM
NYCandDbeyond writes:
I have also heard it helps to keep writing the judge after sentencing, as ultimately they are the person in charge of a sentence reduction in the future




Do you think this can hurt the sentence at all. I was thinking about writing to my fiance's judge but I don't want it to hurt what has already happen (ie. give him a longer sentence; prevent entrance into a early release program)

What do you think?

wench
03-05-2006, 07:07 PM
Personally, I wrote a letter before and after. The judge has a very, very hard job. ~~~ The judge DID read and DID quote from the letter(s). I didn't write the judge afterwards to help get a reduction though... I wrote because I really WAS/AM greatful and I wanted him to know that I appreciated how much thought he gave my guy.

Now.... SENTENCE REDUCTIONS after the sentence given? Can you or somebody talk about this....or shall I search and/or post? You have MY interest.

Blessings and THANKS,

Doni

bellisq
03-06-2006, 08:16 AM
The best way to know if your letter is productive and helpful is to show it to the attorney for review. Once the case is sentenced, the file goes to the clerk's office, and the federal judge doesn't have any more participation.

wench
03-06-2006, 04:08 PM
Is the PD STILL the PD after sentencing? Or are they then done w/ the case?

I can always call the judge's assistant :thumbsup: as she and the judge are top shelf to my anyway. She's very friendly.

So IS there such things as post sentencing reductions...... even when the sentence was pretty darn fair? What are they called or where can I read about this?

Thanks all.......thanks Bellisq!

MANY Blessings,

Doni

FrustratedGirl
03-06-2006, 05:31 PM
Post sentence reductions are under Rule 35. 35a (legality issues) is within 7 days of sentencing and 35b (substantial assistance) is within 1 year in most circumstances. The prosecutor has to file for the 35b.

Rule 35. Correcting or Reducing a Sentence
(a) Correcting Clear Error.
Within 7 days after sentencing, the court may correct a sentence that resulted from arithmetical, technical, or other clear error.
(b) Reducing a Sentence for Substantial Assistance.
(1) In General.
Upon the government's motion made within one year of sentencing, the court may reduce a sentence if:
(A) the defendant, after sentencing, provided substantial assistance in investigating or prosecuting another person; and
(B) reducing the sentence accords with the Sentencing Commission's guidelines and policy statements.
(2) Later Motion.
Upon the government's motion made more than one year after sentencing, the court may reduce a sentence if the defendant's substantial assistance involved:
(A) information not known to the defendant until one year or more after sentencing;
(B) information provided by the defendant to the government within one year of sentencing, but which did not become useful to the government until more than one year after sentencing; or
(C) information the usefulness of which could not reasonably have been anticipated by the defendant until more than one year after sentencing and which was promptly provided to the government after its usefulness was reasonably apparent to the defendant.
(3) Evaluating Substantial Assistance.
In evaluating whether the defendant has provided substantial assistance, the court may consider the defendant's presentence assistance.
(4) Below Statutory Minimum.
When acting under Rule 35(b), the court may reduce the sentence to a level below the minimum sentence established by statute.

wench
03-06-2006, 06:59 PM
Hi FrustratedGirl, thanks for writing.

So this is like an after-the-fact 51k?

Is there any other way? Can the judge decide, after the fact to go lower?

I shouldn't complain....and I'm not at all. What Jim got was a HECK of a lot better than what he was looking at. I'm very greatful to the judge for leaning this way...and sure did give him a tongue lashing in open court... or so Jim tells me. I think ANYBODY would take the tongue lashing and a lower sentence...don't you?

I'm just trying to cover all bases.... ANYTHING to bring him home sooner, to get treatement sooner...... ANYTHING.

Thanks again for writing...

Blessings,

Doni

FrustratedGirl
03-06-2006, 08:39 PM
Yes it is like a 5k1 and sometimes people get one or the other and on occasion both. I'm sure the practice varies from circuit to circuit, but whereas the 5k1 departure is usually for a specified number of levels a 35b can be for any amount of time. The prosecutor recommends an amount, either a specific number of levels(5k1) or a period of time (35b).The judge, of course can grant whatever he wants within reason in either case. I know a prosecutor can appeal a 5k1 departure if it's too great, but I'm not sure about a 35b motion. I have yet to read a case where that has happened. Maybe that's why prosecutors often promise them and don't deliver..they're afraid the judge will be too generous. I'm guessing here so if anyone knows let us know.

curlyhead
03-08-2006, 08:46 AM
it can,t hurt is my opiniom, we wrote to the judge but haven,t had my son,s sentencing yet. will let all know if the judge mentions them. i believe it just give the judge alittle more reason to see you as a human who made mistakes, but has potenial to do better.........................curlyhead

hubcap
01-13-2007, 09:20 PM
I was just curious. My boyfriend is going before the judge in Ohio on a parole violation next week. His case was picked up by the Feds for a drug charge but the Federal Prosecutor has no idea who he is. This is so strange to me. Does it take time for them to charge him? He will find out his fate for the parole violation next week but he has not even had an attorney speak to him on the drug charges. Does it take a while for someone to come talk to him? Any help would be appreciated. I am so sorry for all of you guys. This really sucks for everyone involved. God Bless all of you.

BBOUIE
09-10-2008, 10:13 AM
The judge never read the 50+ letters for my husband. She did hold them up and said they will be going in the packet to the appeallate court. I think it depends on the court AND the judge. I didn't want to write a letter but I felt better after I wrote it. I hope you aren't in Florida. Good luck!


My husband is about to be sentenced in October his attny recommended me to write a letter... just really trying to figurw out what i should include... the BAD NEWS.... im in FLORIDA

freegene
09-10-2008, 03:12 PM
I'm so sorry to hear your in Florida but hopefully it isn't Tampa. Just write a nice letter from your heart. I too was glad I wrote the letter even though it didn't help. Good luck to you!

Zelda50
09-10-2008, 06:35 PM
If you go up to the General Federal Prison Talk section above and click on it, you will find a "Sticky" near the top on the subject of letters to the Court, which will given even more information. Z.

July1988
09-10-2008, 08:30 PM
I wrote a letter that actually made me ache everytime I read it.
Basically telling the judge who he is to me, my children and how I feel about him. I spoke about my support for him and how we all make mistakes and judge him not on what he's done but on how he makes his way through this.
It didn't help one little bit, but it helped me because it was from my heart. I also believe that it helped express how I much I love my husband despite the circumstances TO my husband.

Good Luck.

cl1967
09-12-2008, 05:23 AM
I made it a point to become verbally acquainted with the judge's assistant (I'm very resilient that way). I could not attend my guy's sentencing for a number of reasons, so, before it happened the assistant encouraged letters, said the judge reads all of them. After he was sentenced I called her and she gave me every blow by blow detail of the events and said the judge commented on the letters written. Yes, they have to stay within the letter of the law; however, they are given some latitude. Fortunately for my guy, it basically cut his time in half from the max he could have received. Nothing ventured - nothing gained. WRITE THE LETTER!!!

skipper1953
09-17-2008, 10:51 PM
My son did get a downward departure. Not sure if it was the character letters, his passionate plea regarding his handicapped son, or the video of him caring for the child, but what do you have to lose?

only1love
09-24-2008, 08:00 PM
The attorney told us that in this case, this particular judge wants to know the "person" and so yes, we wrote letters. I know that the judge read them because he mentioned them the last time we were in court. No decision has been made yet in this case, but I think the letters helped.

tenroh0690
09-25-2008, 01:52 PM
in my case it made no difference

Still
11-01-2008, 08:49 AM
I am in the process of writing mine now. The hard part is knowing what is at stake and how much this letter can truly mean. I must have rewritten it 5 times now. And this is before his attorney has even seen it! It may be an easier letter to write when someone is younger, but after so many years of doing things wrong and trying to demonstrate to the judge that it is a real person under all of that who is compassionate and caring, is difficult. Take your time and write the letters, the important thing is for the judge to see him as a person and not just a criminal.

labarnes37
06-14-2010, 08:13 PM
i maybe going to prison

joetnymedic
06-14-2010, 08:52 PM
my judge wanted to hear about me the person, not just my priors, which we all know the prosecutor brings up to make you look like a bad person. I was 42 at the time of my sentencing and in my 20's I'll admit I was a total screw up. Anyway, other then turning my life around before this screw up and having a job where I helped people as well as doing quite a bit of volunteer work, I know the letters from everyone as well as newspaper clips my lawyer had showing I wasn't the same person I was years ago, helped greatly. I was facing up to 36 months for mail fraud and the judge wound up giving me a year and a day, so that was the first positive thing. The second, which I will tell anyone who asks - is that my PO was a totally awesome guy. He saw me facing problems and helped me thru everything. The first day I met my POP, he looked at my record and he probably thought I was a lowlife and to be quite honest back then I was. But the PO took the time to get to know me and actually helped me. While all PO's might not be like him, I know I lucked out all the way around and even though I had/have problems - there was someone to turn to which I never had before. When I had state PO's in my early years, they could care less about me. So in my case, I lucked out all the way around. I'm back on track and will remain on track until I drop.

joe

kittywill
01-28-2013, 08:02 PM
my sentencing is at the end of this month. My pd wrote a letter to the judge asking for a down ward sentence. But the scum bag I worked with has written a horrible letter stateing how my actions affected his company and stated alot of lies and now the gov is going to fight us and ask for an upward sentence. Now i feel like i need to prove him wrong and ask for a contenuence but my pd says i shouldnt.

fbopnomore
01-29-2013, 08:00 AM
If you are convinced that your lawyer is doing a good job, then ask why they are concerned that a continuance could hurt you with that specific judge. If you agree, take the lawyer's advice, if not, don't.

My lawyer was supposed to file a "downward departure motion" before federal sentencing, but didn't. He got yelled at by the judge, but I was the one who was sentenced. From reviewing my judge's other cases, I'm certain that nothing could have made it better for me, but many things could have made it even worse.