View Full Version : Felony friendly states?


deafdgu16
04-16-2008, 05:10 PM
I am going to be getting married to my soon to be wife in October and I need to have a relatively stable position soon. Are there any states that are more felony friendly than others? I'm currently in Michigan, but I have connections in California, Colorado, Minnesota, and Illinois. I'm college educated in business but have basically no skills. Willing to learn anything and move anywhere. I don't care how low my pay is as long as I am getting paid with a prospect of making enough to support my wife. I'm 6'2" 240 lbs with an assault charge but I look harmless to be honest. It was a terrible one-time only mistake. I had just had my car totaled (while it was parked on the side of the road) and had been forced to quit my career position because I couldn't get to work because the car rentals were too expensive after two weeks. I was completely broke and jobless and I just snapped. Not an excuse but that is simply what happened. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

whiz-bang
04-16-2008, 07:35 PM
I am going to be getting married to my soon to be wife in October and I need to have a relatively stable position soon. Are there any states that are more felony friendly than others? I'm currently in Michigan, but I have connections in California, Colorado, Minnesota, and Illinois. I'm college educated in business but have basically no skills. Willing to learn anything and move anywhere. I don't care how low my pay is as long as I am getting paid with a prospect of making enough to support my wife. I'm 6'2" 240 lbs with an assault charge but I look harmless to be honest. It was a terrible one-time only mistake. I had just had my car totaled (while it was parked on the side of the road) and had been forced to quit my career position because I couldn't get to work because the car rentals were too expensive after two weeks. I was completely broke and jobless and I just snapped. Not an excuse but that is simply what happened. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

There are no felony-friendly states, as far as I know.

There are states where people are more likely to live and let live. Most of them are in the west, but certainly do not include California. Idaho, Wyoming. Places like that.

Watch out for states with private prisons and states which either send prisoners to other states or accept prisoners from other states. (Often states that accept prisoners from other states have private prisons. Surprise, surprise.)

Good luck.

Frank Driscoll

AriesMom
04-18-2008, 11:11 AM
Frank-I just read your post and was curious about your statement regarding private prisons. What would that have to do with a state being felony friendly?

I'm in Florida and know that there are alot of private prisons here but not sure I understand what the real differences are between private and state run?

NtShadow
04-21-2008, 10:45 PM
Arizona is a felon friendly state!

sprjit22
05-17-2008, 09:40 PM
well as for private prisons in Florida their was only 3 when I was released in Dec 2003. Florida is very unfriendly to ex felons. I was convicted at 16 (Feb 1998) and I have a hard time doing anything especially finding employment.

shagginabit
05-19-2008, 05:16 PM
does anyone know how friendly DC is? We're thinking of moving there, actually.

cornered
05-20-2008, 10:25 PM
In Colorado you have some protection in employment/education, but that is also job specific. Also, unless you are on parole or in custody you have the right to vote.

codasgirl04
05-23-2008, 06:31 PM
i didn't think arizona was friendly i thought they were one of the states that had the 3 strike law.....

sempiterna
05-29-2008, 12:39 PM
There are no felony-friendly states, as far as I know.

There are states where people are more likely to live and let live. Most of them are in the west, but certainly do not include California. Idaho, Wyoming. Places like that.

Watch out for states with private prisons and states which either send prisoners to other states or accept prisoners from other states. (Often states that accept prisoners from other states have private prisons. Surprise, surprise.)

Good luck.

Frank Driscoll


Oddly, Wyoming has one of the most lenient sex offender regulations.

sempiterna
05-29-2008, 12:41 PM
In Colorado you have some protection in employment/education, but that is also job specific. Also, unless you are on parole or in custody you have the right to vote.

The right to vote is big for me. Being able to get those out of office that are 'vote for me because i've made this many laws and im carelessly tough on criminals' is huge, IMO.

cornered
05-29-2008, 11:54 PM
One big reason why I refused to relocate to AZ with family. In AZ you can't vote. The commie lovin' state cowards already stripped me of a couple rights, I'll be damned if they're gonna take any more!

Abner
06-03-2008, 01:33 PM
I am going to be getting married to my soon to be wife in October and I need to have a relatively stable position soon. Are there any states that are more felony friendly than others? I'm currently in Michigan, but I have connections in California, Colorado, Minnesota, and Illinois. I'm college educated in business but have basically no skills. Willing to learn anything and move anywhere. I don't care how low my pay is as long as I am getting paid with a prospect of making enough to support my wife. I'm 6'2" 240 lbs with an assault charge but I look harmless to be honest. It was a terrible one-time only mistake. I had just had my car totaled (while it was parked on the side of the road) and had been forced to quit my career position because I couldn't get to work because the car rentals were too expensive after two weeks. I was completely broke and jobless and I just snapped. Not an excuse but that is simply what happened. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

There are no felony-friendly states, but some are much worse than others.

In your case, I'd look for a state where the law makes it harder for people to find out about your past. Be careful about states that make it crime to misrepresent anything. I'd worry less about voting than about making a living.

California -- where I live -- has its good and bad points. The good point is that it's populous, and there's lots of opportunities. The bad is that it's costly to live here and we have the nastiest three-strikes law in the nation.

If you're willing, say, to do blue-collar work, i.e., moving, etc., that might be a good way to go.

I'd avoid the southern states, like Florida, Georgia, etc.

You might also want to visit all of the various state fora and ask there. This site is a fount of information.

Good luck and keep us posted.

abner

VandMe
08-23-2008, 07:19 PM
does any one know of any actual felon-friendly employer in Colorado ? My bf has a felony for intent to distribute marijuanna charge and almost everyone he makes contact with are telling him that drug charges are the hardest to find employment for. Any ideas???

Mark2008
11-15-2008, 04:57 AM
I found the best thing for me was to move a good ways away and start a new life. I moved halfway across the country and took a position in the same field I was in prior to my arrest. I realize I had the advantages most people do not: a university education and fair amount of experience in my field.

I have never talked to a single person business-wise about my situation. In that regard, I am a new person and it simply doesn't exist. I've worked for five employers in the past seven years (due to either moving up or layoffs caused by the economy) and it has NEVER come up. Best I can tell, they don't have a clue. Now, of course, I'm not working for the government, not dealing with weapons, not working with minors, etc. Some lines of work are more vulnerable than others.

Not saying that works best for everyone, but that is what worked in my case.

Gridlocked
12-24-2008, 12:16 AM
These states below are as felony friendly as it gets I suppose and I understand that some companies that do background checks don't follow these rules. I also don't if this is if you apply for work in that state or have a record for that state. Further 7 years after what out of prison? after probation?

I started searching for companies that do criminal background checks to see what their policies are and came up with this. Some jobs have no limit.


Following is a list of the states that limit reporting of criminal convictions to 7 years. If the state provides a salary level exception, the minimum salary to qualify for the exception is also noted.

State

Minimum Salary

Code

California

No Exception

Civil Code Sections 1785.13.6 & 1786.18.7

Colorado

$75,000

Title 12 Article 14.3 Section 105.3

Kansas

$20,000

Chapter 50 Article 7 Section 704

Maryland

No Exception

Title 14 Subtitle 12 Section 1203

*Massachusetts

No Exception

Title 15 Chapter 93 Section 52

Montana

No Exception

Title 31 Chapter 3 Section 112

Nevada

No Exception

Title 52 Chapter 598C Section 150

New Hampshire

$20,000

Title 31 Chapter 359-B Section 5

New Mexico

No Exception

Chapter 56 Article 3 Section 6

New York

$25,000

Article 25 Section 380-j

Texas

$75,000

Chapter 20 Section 20.05

Washington

$20,000

Title 19 Chapter 182 Section 040

htiek123
12-24-2008, 09:45 AM
Again, good post Gridlocked,

Yes these are the 7 states. Do you see the salary requirements? What these states with the low salary requirement are saying is that you can work at Micky D's or Burger King for less than 20,000 after 7 years but nothing else.

Why so low. I live in NJ and was going to look for work in NY but with a 25,000 limit what’s the use? After transportation costs, and that’s if I get a job under 25,000.

Who can live on 25,000 in the tri state area?

Gridlocked
12-24-2008, 01:20 PM
New York has some sort of certificate of rehabilitation that ex felons can get somehow. I'm not from there so I don't know the details but maybe you could look into that. I'm not sure how it plays into employment but certainly with 16 years out of the system you could qualify for such a certificate.

New York seems to be one of the states where the large population of ex felons is becoming an issue and changes have to be made to allow for felons to seek employment without barriers at some level anyway.

In January I'll be 9 years out from my last arrest. How long is long enough?

I saw an ad for a job in Denver for a Southwest airlines ramp attendant and it said felons okay other than the following crimes(#26 kills me and maybe #1):

To work at the airport, you must be able to obtain a Secured Identification Display Area (SIDA) badge. You will be required to meet all local airport requirements. For the security access, job seekers must have no conviction, guilty plea, or judgment not guilty by reason of insanity in the last 10 years for any of the following disqualifying criminal offenses, as determined by the federal Transportation Security Administration:

1 Forgery of certificates, false marking of aircraft, and other aircraft registration violations
2 Interference with air navigation
3 Improper transportation of a hazardous material
4 Aircraft piracy
5 Interference with flightcrew members or flight attendants
6 Commission of certain crimes aboard aircraft in flight
7 Carrying a weapon or explosive aboard an aircraft
8 Conveying false information and threats
9 Aircraft piracy outside the special aircraft jurisdiction of the United States
10 Lighting violations involving transporting controlled substances
11 Unlawful entry into an aircraft or airport area that serves air carriers or foreign air carriers contrary to established security requirements
12 Destruction of an aircraft or aircraft facility
13 Murder
14 Assault with intent to murder
15 Espionage
16 Sedition
17 Kidnapping or hostage taking
18 Treason
19 Rape or aggravated sexual abuse
20 Unlawful possession, use, sale, distribution, or manufacture of an explosive or weapon
21 Extortion
22 Armed robbery or felony unarmed robbery
23 Distribution of, or intent to distribute, a controlled substance
24 Felony arson
25 A felony involving a threat
26 A felony involving: Willful destruction of property; importation or manufacture of a controlled substance;
burglary; theft; dishonesty, fraud, or misrepresentation; possession or distribution of stolen property; aggravated assault; bribery; or illegal possession of a controlled substance punishable by a maximum term of imprisonment of more than 1 year, or any other crime classified as a felony that the Administrator determines indicates a propensity for placing contraband aboard an aircraft in return for money
27 Violence at international airports
28 Conspiracy or attempt to commit any of the aforementioned criminal acts listed above.

ericjourney
12-30-2008, 11:15 AM
The Kansas statute (KSA 50-704 7) regarding background checks states that no consumer reporting agency may report records of arrest/indictment/conviction after 7 years (after release or parole). However, the law goes on to say that this rule does not apply for jobs with an annual salary of $20,000 or more.

Also, this statute covers "consumer reporting agencies" only; if an employer uses a third party background check company, that company can't report the arrest after 7 years. But if the employer contacts state or federal directly, the arrest would still be reported.

whiz-bang
12-30-2008, 02:46 PM
True story:

In the mid-60s, a man was convicted of murder in the state of Colorado. He was very young at the time of the incident and, of course, didn't have a bunch of money or a slick lawyer.

He protested his innocence, however, and continued to appeal his conviction.

Many years passed. He grew to manhood in the Walls, and became middle aged. By the time his ordeal ended, he had spent about half his life in prison. At last, though, he was vindicated. He wasn't exonerated, you understand, but he did beat the rap. A federal court ruled that his constitutional rights had been violated during his arrest and interrogation, and the state was ordered to release him and expunge his records.

I know this is true because I worked in the Reception Center in Canon City during the mid-70s. Sure enough, the five or six manila folders full of paperwork his fifteen or so years inside generated were kept in the bottom drawer of a filing cabinet, separate and distinct from the rest of the records. Each folder had been stamped "Expunged."

In bright red ink.

The moral of this story is, anything that gets written down or entered into a data base will exist, somewhere, until the end of time. To think otherwise is naive.

I do like the idea of the authorities issuing certificates of compliance with the terms of prison sentences, although I'm a little unclear about how the certificates could be used to play down the fact that one has done time.

Bemusedly,

FD

Gridlocked
12-30-2008, 04:08 PM
I believe this would allow the ex felon to apply for professional licenses and receive them irregardless of their background. NY also has the 7 year rule but as has been pointed out thats only for consumer credit reporting companies to follow - companies that do background security checks go back forever and as you stated once something is in writing its there forever.

The current system creates a 'felon class' of society that irregardless of rehabilitation efforts or job skills training and education are less able to make a living than others that have fewer qualifications skills and abilities.

In one state where I was in prison it has a single skills training program for 'sheet metal' however the state has a 'good character' clause in its professional licensing for sheet metal installers. In addition unions there do not in general accept ex felons as members. The program is therefore a joke designed to put a show on for the liberal members of society to believe that some form of rehabilitation is being carried out and to further the idea that recidivism is the complete fault of the ex felon who isn't trying.

I was able to be retrained from my profession which has cement roadblocks for an ex felon and spent much time and money getting trained in HVAC (not sheetmetal) during my last bid and just when I got out because I was told companies would hire me even with a record.

I found a state that allowed me to take a licensing test when I got out and also got the EPA license. Well I was told wrong about them hiring ex felons in this business and its likely that my license will be revoked because they are adding a 'good character' clause to the license in that state also. Just a matter of time before I go to renew and they ask me to sign off on a background check to renew.

htiek123
12-31-2008, 09:44 AM
Brother Gridlocked you better preach the Gospel.

“The program is therefore a joke designed to put a show on for the liberal members of society to believe that some form of rehabilitation is being carried out and to further the idea that recidivism is the complete fault of the ex felon who isn't trying.”

The second chance act and these rehabilitation certificates provide nothing.

These are the main points of the second chance act. This act has no real remedy for employment disenfranchise. They stress faith based service, I’m all for that, but this does nothing for a background check. What employers are going to participate? It’s just a big smoke screen and the rehabilitation cert is a bigger joke!!!!

To meet the individual needs of recently released ex-offenders as they transition back to society, PRI connects these individuals with faith-based and other nonprofit organizations within their community.
DOJ grants are awarded to State agencies for pre-release services to partner anti-recidivism efforts with those of faith-based and community organizations.
DOL funds are awarded to faith-based and community organizations that provide a variety of assistance to returning prisoners, including workforce development services, job training, counseling, and other reentry services.
Education, vocational training, and job placement services
Coordinated supervision for offenders upon release, including housing and mental and physical health care
Programs that encourage offenders to develop safe, healthy, and responsible family and parent-child relationships
Job placement services, what a joke!!!


There is a certificate of rehabilitation, in New Jersey, this would allow the ex felon to apply for professional licenses, but you still have to pass a background check for a job.

Mind you a certificate has not been requested or granted in New Jersey for 15 years. These certificates don’t show up on Background checks.

Again no hope!!!!

kralcx
01-17-2009, 03:06 PM
I want to thank you Gridlocked for the information given on the so-called "Felon Friendly States". I wanted to correct two of the states you mentioned.

In Massachusetts there is a $20,000 minumin salary cap

and in New York there is no minumin salary cap.

I would provide a link to this information, however I can not because my post count is so low.

Thanks again for the information.

htiek123
01-18-2009, 08:33 AM
Dear Kralcx,

Sorry but your info with regards to NY is wrong. How I wish you were right. I live in NJ about 30 miles from NY, with NJ transit I would be able to get there in under an hour, however NY limit is 25,000 dollars with regards to the 7 year rule. I can understand your confusion. When citing NY background check laws most website leave out this 25K limit, so I went to the Laws of New York State website.

Please search for ARTICLE 25 SECTION 380-J

New York (Enacted 1977)

FCRA, Article 25 Section 380-j

Prohibited Information (a) No consumer reporting agency shall report or maintain in the file on a consumer, information relative to an arrest or a criminal charge unless there has been a criminal conviction for such offense, or unless such charges are still pending.
(b) A CRA can report information about a detention of an individual by a retail establishment if the individual has admitted wrongdoing, has received notice that the information will be reported to a CRA
and may be further reported to a retail establishment for employment purposes.
(f) No CRA may make any consumer report containing records of convictions which, from date of disposition, release, or parole, antedate the report by more than seven years. Exception: If salary is reasonably expected to be $25K or more, the 7-year restriction does not apply.

Gridlocked
01-19-2009, 10:20 PM
I actually believe the Massachusetts statutes only deal with misdemeanors after 5 years also with no law concerning felony convictions but its hard to pin them all down. I was turned down for a great job a few weeks ago in MA.

I went to human resource websites to pull up this info which seems to be published by companies touting that their investigative services are NOT hindered by there laws. There are some different versions out there. I believe there are some other errors on the list I provided but other than those states no other states have stuck by any of the old FCRA requirements.

My future focus is to work for myself as long as I can get insurance.



I want to thank you Gridlocked for the information given on the so-called "Felon Friendly States". I wanted to correct two of the states you mentioned.

In Massachusetts there is a $20,000 minumin salary cap

and in New York there is no minumin salary cap.

I would provide a link to this information, however I can not because my post count is so low.

Thanks again for the information.

scoopster
01-21-2009, 09:11 PM
Boston massachusettes has a city ordinance for city workers they can not do a background check until after you have been hired. It has been in place for 3 years. One guy, ex-felon was driving a snow plow truck, hit and killed a lady, and fled. They still kept their policy in place. Minenapolis minnestoa also, and washington DC had one pending.
The states will not budge, therefore, some cities are changing the rules through city councils. I also saw where the parole board chairwoman for I believe it was vermont said, "If we (the state) won't hire them, then why would the private sector?" basically emphasizing that the state should hire them, so private employers will.

scoopster
01-21-2009, 09:53 PM
we need to create a website so we can add employers with location city/state that do not hire felons. More and more keep joining this list. All it takes is a disgruntled employee who gets fired, and has no record to make a threat, and bam the company changes their policy.
My friend who is a cop and private security was sitting outside of a lady for HR who was threatened by an employee they fired. He said the guy had no record. These people with no records don't care or think about us who have records, cause they can go to any employer.
I worked for warehouse for 3 1/2 yrs, we had about 15 ex-cons on our shift, was making $17/hr. the company laid off 120 of us, went back a year later when they hired back. They denied any of us who had felonies. I called their corporate HR and explained that You don't have to train me, I can work in every department, and make less errors than a new guy. Plus be up to full speed faster than a new guy, and stack product way better. She agreed 100%. She called me back and said they will not change their policy. But she agreed with me.
I also did this to temp services, call their corporate offices requesting for policy of denying ex-felons, none of them would produce it and they all said the office was an independent office I was at and not a corporate . I replied they still have your company logo, and it will be your company name in the court system.

kralcx
01-22-2009, 04:24 PM
sorry for the confusion about New York, htiek123

unfortunately for me my felony is only 5 years old; so I'm still screwed either way :(

kylee23
01-22-2009, 04:34 PM
I live in Missouri and its not bad here. im a felon myself and i would suggest that you try sale's. also i heard on the news that some state was looking to make it so that companies didn't have you check that box once off any kinda paper. i don't know if its passed or if they were just thinking bout it but you can check it out. oh and we can vote here : )
Good luck

Albee Damned
01-22-2009, 05:51 PM
I started this thread yesterday. One of the categories they "grade" states on is emplyment laws for felons. Their grading system isn't perfect, but it gives you a good idea about what are "good" states and which are "bad" for ex-offenders for all types of issues, not just employment. You can then research the actual policies of any state of interest to find out exactly what is legal and illegal for an emplyer to do there. This would be especially invaluable if you live in a "bad" state and are considering moving to a more ex-offender "friendly" one.

Good luck!

Albee

scoopster
01-22-2009, 08:20 PM
what has everyone heard regarding the EEOC doing a two year study as far as ex-felons being a minority?
I read about it and called washington, spoke to attorney, who said they will be changing their internal rules, not the U.S.C. Federal Laws. She had no clue when it will be done. I called about 6 months later, and another attorney said it will be posted on the EEOC website, which I do not believe.
Has anyone else investigated into this?

Albee Damned
02-04-2009, 01:49 PM
what has everyone heard regarding the EEOC doing a two year study as far as ex-felons being a minority?
I read about it and called washington, spoke to attorney, who said they will be changing their internal rules, not the U.S.C. Federal Laws. She had no clue when it will be done. I called about 6 months later, and another attorney said it will be posted on the EEOC website, which I do not believe.
Has anyone else investigated into this?

I will look into it when I have time. Hopefully soon!

As far as the website for those not hiring ex-felons, I could help with that but I have SO VERY LITTLE TIME right now. I also wanted to get this movement going about discrimination that is taking place against ex-offenders, starting a website for that would be a good start I think, but NO TIME! :angry:

Also a comprehensive, up-to-date website that summarizes the federal and state laws would be a great resource, too. Arrrrghhh!

azxff
02-10-2009, 03:26 AM
My experience with AZ is that they are very "felon friendly" You don't have to do much there and they will gladly make you a felon...LOL Right friendly I'd say:D

JBougie
02-14-2009, 09:32 PM
I am in Minnesota ... they are surely NOT felon friendly. Finding a job here with a felony is almost impossible; it took my husband foreverrr to find one.

Thankfully his boss believes everyone needs a 2nd chance and didn't hold it against him that he was convicted and spent 7 years in starting in 2000.
So yeah, I would take Minnesota off the list of possible places to go.

tropicalnla
02-15-2009, 07:49 PM
Hi I just wanted to post my opinion although I'm no expert... Title Insurance Companies (such as first ameircan, Lawyers title , etc.) hire felons as "Title Sales Representatives" even if you have a felony. I know a couple people who have felonies and one guy who is part owner that is a felon... They have pretty descent wages, great insurance, and awesome perks..I would also suggest "Loan officer work" for a small real estate broker..(most offer small salaries but great commission) .....Also the oil refineries are filled with felons in the Long Beach, Ca area..(i know a bunch of guys who work there making upwards of $25 an hour 12 hour shifts)........Good luck guys and gals..PS..- I'm referring to California I've never been anywhere else

Albee Damned
02-19-2009, 02:40 PM
Hi I just wanted to post my opinion although I'm no expert... Title Insurance Companies (such as first ameircan, Lawyers title , etc.) hire felons as "Title Sales Representatives" even if you have a felony. I know a couple people who have felonies and one guy who is part owner that is a felon... They have pretty descent wages, great insurance, and awesome perks..I would also suggest "Loan officer work" for a small real estate broker..(most offer small salaries but great commission) .....Also the oil refineries are filled with felons in the Long Beach, Ca area..(i know a bunch of guys who work there making upwards of $25 an hour 12 hour shifts)........Good luck guys and gals..PS..- I'm referring to California I've never been anywhere else

I know the refinieries USED to hire ex-offenders, but I figured their policies changed. Do you know these people working there NOW? How long have they worked there? Any recent hires that have felony records? Maybe they have been there so long that the company keeps them, but nowadays wouldn't hire an ex-felon???

Thanks!

Albee

fleecedbyafelon
02-19-2009, 03:17 PM
Do you have any interest in being a building contractor? There is no back ground restrictions for being licensed as a contractor in Florida. I'm glad to hear that you are sorry about what you did. When you go to get a job, be honest about your past and tell them what happened and that you screwed up.

I hired a contractor in Panama City, Florida who had been to prison for about 8 years and didn't disclose his past. He became desperate for money and started bullying me for pay advances. First he used compliments and told me how much he liked me and how much he appreciated all the help I gave him. I listened to his personal problems and tried to find him more houses to build. I was nice to him and trusted him and he used, abused and scammed me.

But later when I told him that I couldn't advance him money anymore he snapped and went into a rage. He cornered me and trapped my escape. He got away with it though as his family has the right connections.

He never said that he was sorry! He was so mad that I wouldn't give him pay advances and that I talk about what happened that he blurted out that he had been to prison and never met anyone as bad as me!

He was so mad that he never finished my house and is trying to scam me for a whole lot more money as his family has big money to pay lawyers.

It sure sounds like he deserves to be in prison more than you do.

Good Luck.

tropicalnla
02-22-2009, 11:37 PM
Sorry Albee just saw this... my cousin has been at an oil refinery about 9 months...he actual took a 6 month course that was free and was hired a couple months after that he disclosed his record (identity theft) and was still hiredI know the refinieries USED to hire ex-offenders, but I figured their policies changed. Do you know these people working there NOW? How long have they worked there? Any recent hires that have felony records? Maybe they have been there so long that the company keeps them, but nowadays wouldn't hire an ex-felon???

Thanks!

Albee

MyTwoBoys
02-23-2009, 12:33 PM
Florida is NOT a friendly state to begin with (The Sunshine state my butt) Micky D's won't even hire you in FL with a felony on your record nor are you able to rent in ANY of the apartment communites. Blech, Florida bites LOL

MyTwoBoys
02-23-2009, 12:36 PM
Do you have any interest in being a building contractor? There is no back ground restrictions for being licensed as a contractor in Florida. I'm glad to hear that you are sorry about what you did. When you go to get a job, be honest about your past and tell them what happened and that you screwed up.

I hired a contractor in Panama City, Florida who had been to prison for about 8 years and didn't disclose his past. He became desperate for money and started bullying me for pay advances. First he used compliments and told me how much he liked me and how much he appreciated all the help I gave him. I listened to his personal problems and tried to find him more houses to build. I was nice to him and trusted him and he used, abused and scammed me.

But later when I told him that I couldn't advance him money anymore he snapped and went into a rage. He cornered me and trapped my escape. He got away with it though as his family has the right connections.

He never said that he was sorry! He was so mad that I wouldn't give him pay advances and that I talk about what happened that he blurted out that he had been to prison and never met anyone as bad as me!

He was so mad that he never finished my house and is trying to scam me for a whole lot more money as his family has big money to pay lawyers.

It sure sounds like he deserves to be in prison more than you do.

Good Luck.

:eek: This sounds like a very bad situation BUT as a resident of Florida AND the wife of an inmate, I think maybe you just happened to end up dealing with a unsavory character. I'm sorry this happened to you and best of luck getting a fair resolution!

Bob Bordonaro
04-13-2009, 05:28 PM
I have a quick question? I was convicted on 04-01, for a 6 yr sentence. Does that 7 yr limitation in Tx, does it go from the date of conviction, or the ending date of my sentence?

htiek123
04-14-2009, 06:06 AM
Texas: Business & Commerce Code – Chapter 20 20.05 – Reporting of information Prohibited. (a) Except as provided by Subsection (b), a consumer reporting agency may not furnish a consumer report containing information related to: (4) a record of arrest, indictment, or conviction of a crime in which the date of disposition, release, or parole predates the consumer report by more than seven years. Exception: If the salary of an individual equals or is reasonable expected to equal $75,000 or more, the 7-year restriction does not apply.

Meaning 7 years after you complete your sentence.

I wish they had this in NJ

shagginabit1980
04-17-2009, 03:42 PM
It really doesn't help much, htiek. I'm in Texas and let me tell ya -- they are NOT felon or misdemeanor friendly, at least not that I've noticed.

htiek123
04-17-2009, 07:04 PM
It really doesn't help much, htiek. I'm in Texas and let me tell ya -- they are NOT felon or misdemeanor friendly, at least not that I've noticed.

It helps some, and would certainly help me. At least in Texas after 7 years the conviction will not show up.

My conviction was 17 years ago and it shows up on every background check here in NJ.

NY has the 7 year rule however if your going to make more that 25,000 it does not apply

shagginabit1980
04-17-2009, 08:25 PM
well,

I don't know what to tell you because my misdemeanor conviction was in 1998 and it STILL pops up here. and the jobs I apply for are under 70K a year. I've gotten dozens of denials and it all stems with that conviction.

LetMeLiveAgain
04-17-2009, 08:38 PM
well,

I don't know what to tell you because my misdemeanor conviction was in 1998 and it STILL pops up here. and the jobs I apply for are under 70K a year. I've gotten dozens of denials and it all stems with that conviction.


A "consumer report" only goes back 7 years, but a "background report" goes back as far as they want to pay for. Background reports are what you, I and many get caught in.

htiek123
04-18-2009, 11:40 AM
Yes, letmeliveagain,

A background report is also known as a consumer report if a third party conducts it. It’s the same as a credit report and they are regulated by the Fair Credit Reporting act.

If an employer runs his own background check (physically going to the court house himself) the 7 year rule does not apply, but most employer I know use a third party reporting agencies, very few will spend the extra money on low and mid paying jobs to have a staff member go to all the court houses in your state.

htiek123
04-18-2009, 11:58 AM
Shagginabit1980,

If you were denied a job (Adverse Action) due to a consumer report, by law you must receive a copy of that report. You have recourse. If a ten year old convection shows up on a consumer background report in Texas you have cause for suit.

Again very few employers physically run their own background checks.


What is Adverse Action?

Section 603(k)(1) of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) states that an adverse action is “a denial of employment or any other decision for employment purposes that adversely affects any current or prospective employee.” These decisions include not hiring, not retaining or not promoting an individual.

What does this mean for my company?

If your company uses a consumer report/investigative consumer report in whole or in part to deny someone employment or promotion, you are obligated under the FCRA to provide both Pre-Adverse and Adverse Action Disclosures to those applicants/employees.

What is a Pre-Adverse Action Disclosure?

The disclosure must contain information stating that an adverse employment action will be taken, a copy of the consumer report/investigative report, and a summary of the applicant’s/employee’s rights. The disclosure must also include the consumer reporting agency’s name and contact information. Once the applicant/employee receives the disclosure, he or she must be given sufficient time to dispute the information.

This is Federal Law

shagginabit1980
04-18-2009, 12:32 PM
Sounds like I need some copies of those reports then. I know one of the college I have applied to damn near a million times uses a "consumer report", but I have been turned down due to the info that's in there, yet I've never gotten a copy of the report. Since the conviction is way over 7 years old, it sounds like a major problem. I'm going to check that out asap.