View Full Version : Early Release question about Washington State inmates


awill4phil
01-24-2004, 11:52 AM
Has Anyone Heard Anything About Early Release For Washington State Inmates? I Heard (informally) That Prosecutors Were All Uptight About The Early Release Of Non Violent Crime Offenders. Anyone Else Heard Of This In The Last Day Or So?

Emerald Fire
01-24-2004, 01:37 PM
Has Anyone Heard Anything About Early Release For Washington State Inmates? I Heard (informally) That Prosecutors Were All Uptight About The Early Release Of Non Violent Crime Offenders. Anyone Else Heard Of This In The Last Day Or So?

I heard Tuesday it was voted on and passed!!! If I am correct, it is 1/2 time for all inmates being held for a non-violent crime, despite past criminal history...
desipite their past criminal history. :)

JustCLynn
01-24-2004, 11:44 PM
ooooh! how awesome! that is great news for a whole lot of people, even me considering my b/f has only been gone for not even 2 months, now that means i will only be away from him for a year instead of 2! thanks for the info!

JustLisa
01-25-2004, 10:45 AM
I hope this is really true.. My fiance already got half-time but I have a friend who was just sent to Shelton and he is hoping to get it but he had a violent offense in his past.... Let's hope it is really true... I had called Shelton a few weeks ago and as of then the person's past history still affected it....

JustCLynn
01-25-2004, 10:54 AM
you mean if you call them, they can tell you when they will be possibly released, etc?

JustLisa
01-25-2004, 10:58 AM
Hi Wolfe.. when I called Shelton I didn't ask about him specifically I just asked if the early release was now being granted for people EVEN if they had a violent offense in their history.. At that time it wasn't.. But maybe it has passed since then...

KRAFTIKAT
02-10-2004, 12:08 AM
Jeff Was Convicted Of Possession With Intent And Bailjumping. This Is The Only County I Think That Throws That One On Someone For Missing A Court Time By A Couple Of Hours. But They Told Him Only One Third Off So His Release Is June 25 2005. Do You Think They Will Shorten It Up More??

JustLisa
02-10-2004, 12:16 AM
HI Kraft.. Was his possession and manufacture of methamphetimine or another drug Most drug offenses get half time except for certain meth offenses??? . Also if he has ANY past felony domestic violence or any other violent offense or sex offense he will not get the half time.. just the 1/3 off... You can look up Senate Bill 5990 which explains the extra time off..

I am still trying to find out if this has been revised any to take away the past felonies cancelling someone out....

KRAFTIKAT
02-10-2004, 12:52 AM
HI Kraft.. Was his possession and manufacture of methamphetimine or another drug Most drug offenses get half time except for certain meth offenses??? . Also if he has ANY past felony domestic violence or any other violent offense or sex offense he will not get the half time.. just the 1/3 off... You can look up Senate Bill 5990 which explains the extra time off..

I am still trying to find out if this has been revised any to take away the past felonies cancelling someone out....
IT WAS INTENT TO DELIVER. HE HAS A COMPLETELY CLEAR RECORD, NOT EVEN A TICKET.

awill4phil
02-10-2004, 04:19 AM
Jeff Was Convicted Of Possession With Intent And Bailjumping. This Is The Only County I Think That Throws That One On Someone For Missing A Court Time By A Couple Of Hours. But They Told Him Only One Third Off So His Release Is June 25 2005. Do You Think They Will Shorten It Up More??
WHAT COUNTY ARE YOU IN KRAFTIKAT??

Sasquatch21
11-06-2007, 09:18 AM
I have a friend who is in the Inmate Worker Annex. He has heard rumors if this Half time law. Does anyone know the RCW for it so that it can be looked up? I cannot find it anywhere. He needs it to make sure that his release date is correct. Due to the fact that he is in there for a non-violent crime. License Suspended in the First degree 3rd offense is why he is serving time in jail. Any help would be appreciated ASAP.

Sasquatch21
11-06-2007, 08:38 PM
heard rumors now that the only time you are eligible for 1/2 time is that if you have not been convicted prievously (past offenses) of violent, drug or sexual related crimes/ Anyone have a link to a site that has the law written out in full? With all ammendments and all info on it so I can let him know if he is eligible or not. In Washington State please if that makes any difference

Nawna
11-07-2007, 04:07 PM
have you tried going to the WA GOV site?

Sasquatch21
11-07-2007, 07:59 PM
yes and it is so complex in trying to find anything it is ridiculus. Just like on the WA State RCW's Site. I even tried looking up Senate Bill 5990 and all I got was some bill for crane operators and permits and stuff. Nothing about the 1/2 time law. Help? Anyone? This needs to get found out. Cause if he is eligible then i am pretty sure he should be out by now

sis519
11-08-2007, 01:35 PM
It's a real complex bill. I believe you are looking for Senate Bill 6157. You should be able to find the conditions of the early release in there. You can google it, or contact me here, I am not able to post the URL's yet because I do not have 25 posts, but I have the URL's availabe to the bill and the bill report (summary) if anyone has trouble finding them

Nawna
11-08-2007, 05:23 PM
http://www.leg.wa.gov/pub/billinfo/2007-08/Pdf/Bills/Session%20Law%202007/6157-S.SL.pdf


if you look a few forums down 'escape from reality' posted the whole law.

krislovesbilly
02-19-2008, 05:35 PM
i looked up bill 6157 and the only thing I could really find was that inmates will be released to work release if they have 6 months or less remaining of there time

rkasbaum
07-02-2008, 02:46 PM
When you all examine these billls pay careful attention to the details. One of the primary componets of the changes to the RCW's that affect earned release is 2179.sl in this house billl section 7 states that if a offender IS sentenced for
A sex offense not sentenced under RCW 9.94A.712;
22 (b) A violent offense;
23 (c) A crime against persons under RCW 9.94A.411(2);
24 (d) A felony offender under chapter 69.50 or 69.52 RCW.
they ARE elligble for community custody in leu of earned release! So those who were rejected for half time for the above crines will get community custody, probation, for the same amout of time.
HOWEVER IT STATES AT THE TOP OF THE BILL
"EFFECTIVE DATE: 06/12/08 - Except sections 6 through 60, which
become effective 08/01/09."
and all of this stuff is in section 7

codasgirl04
07-08-2008, 01:45 PM
I also e-mailed the governor about the 10day early release prior to there ERD, and they sent me four pages about it! From how i understood it, all inmates unless doing a life sentence, or violation of parole is eligible for the 10day extra early release, if they are approved! that is awesome news!

Sh0r3ty
07-08-2008, 08:57 PM
yeah but those 10 days are only good for those that have not gotten into trouble and things like that ... but thats still pretty good news ...

codasgirl04
07-09-2008, 10:56 AM
that is true, so i'm hoping he keeps his nose clean:)

rkasbaum
07-11-2008, 01:01 PM
I hate to possibly be the bearer of bad news but after an almost 2 month wait I got a return call from the DOC, Washington Corrections Center for Women (WCCW) and found that this bill (6157) really changes none of the laws, even the sections that are effective next year, it simply reorganizes them. I am trying to validate this but I was told that none of the sections in the the bill are not already in the RCW my conflict is why is it new and why does it appear to grant half time to non-violent offenders. If we can get a few more sets of eyes on this document maybe we can figure it out.

codasgirl04
07-11-2008, 02:12 PM
hmmm.... that is odd, i know that a few guys that i have seen at Stafford have gotten there ERD.
the 10 day early release said that all offenders unless doing life or violating there probation are eligible for it, that is how i understood it.

mrsweber253
10-16-2008, 09:51 AM
Even as the US prison population edged over the two-million mark last year, driven by two decades of harsh anti-crime legislation and drug war hysteria, bleak economic realities at statehouses across the country have begun exerting a significant counter-pressure. With state budgets in the worst shape since the Great Depression, more and more states are finding they simply cannot afford to imprison ever-increasing numbers of their citizens. Last week, Washington State became the latest to begin to reverse harsh sentencing policies because the treasury is empty.
Legislators there passed Senate Bill 5990, an act that will increase the speed with which certain categories of offenders can win early release. Under the bill, backed by Gov. Gary Locke (D) and passed by overwhelming margins in both chambers, almost a thousand Washington state prisoners, including many drug offenders, will walk out of prison early, and more inmates will get out more quickly in the future.
The state had already passed sentencing reform legislation last year, set to go into effect in 2004, but SB 5990 moves that change up a year.
"It's the budget," said Roger Goodman, director of the King County Bar Association's Drug Policy Project and a key player in an innovative reform effort that has drawn state and local health and legal professional groups into an increasingly successful effort to reform the state's drug laws. "We were in on various meetings, but getting this bill passed didn't require a lot of coalition-building or frantic testimony," he told DRCNet. "We have one of the worst budget deficits in the country. With anti-tax sentiment running high here, all the governor could do was propose cuts, and the Republican-controlled Senate cheerfully endorsed his prison proposal."
The state will save about $34 million next year alone by enacting SB 5990, according to state legislative analysts, and more than 900 current prisoners will walk free early.


The bill's features include:

An increase in earned early release eligibility from 33% to 50% of time sentenced for all current prisoners convicted of nonviolent, non-sex offenses who have no history of violent or sex offenses -- mostly drug offenders and property offenders. The increase does not apply to prisoners convicted of domestic violence, residential burglary, meth manufacture or drug sales to minors, nor to prisoners considered "high risk" despite the nature of their charges.
An increase in earned early release eligibility from 33% to 50% of time sentenced for those convicted after July 1 of nonviolent, non-sex offenses who have no history of violent or sex offenses. The same eligibility restrictions as above apply.
A decrease in earned early release eligibility from 15% to 10% of time sentenced for all serious violent offenses and sex offenses.
Moving up the effective date of the new drug sentencing grid up by one year, to July 1, 2003, so there will be vastly expanded judicial discretion and more treatment-oriented sentencing for drug offenses committed on or after that date.
A funding increase for the Criminal Justice Treatment Fund, for court-supervised drug treatment at the county level -- in other words, drug courts. Funds will rise from $8.25 million last year to $8.9 million this year.
A study of the effects of these changes on the recidivism rate, to be conducted by the Washington State Institute for Public Policy and completed by 2008.
A sunset provision set for 2010.
"What this means is that fewer big drug offenders will go to prison; more will go to jail. And fewer low-level drug offenders will go to jail; more will go to treatment," said Goodman. "Judges will have more flexibility to order treatment and other services instead of confinement."

Goodman acknowledged that leaving drug treatment within the criminal justice system, as the drug court system does, is not the most desirable outcome, but counseled pragmatic patience. "Reform is always two steps forward, one step back," he said, "but now this whole idea of treatment over incarceration has been mainstreamed. It's no longer radical. The next step is government regulation of drugs instead of government regulation of human behavior. That's much more radical."
While legislators may not be ready to embrace radical notions of personal autonomy, evidence from across the country suggests they are now desperately searching for some means to reduce their grossly swollen prison budgets. And while moves such as reducing inmate programs or facilities can marginally reduce costs, the one proven way to do so is to reduce the number of people in prison.
And the states are acting. In the last two years, Indiana and Louisiana have repealed some of their stiffer sentencing laws for drug crimes and other nonviolent offenses, while Ohio, Illinois, Michigan and Massachusetts have shut down prisons. Kentucky released several hundred prisoners early, and when scandal forced an end to that program, state officials there changed parole standards to release prisoners earlier. Texas officials have ordered parole officers to reduce the number of returned parole violators. And sentencing commissions from Kansas and Oklahoma to Alabama and South Carolina have recommended or will recommend sentencing changes to reduce prison populations. In all of these cases, nonviolent drug offenders are or will be prime benefactors.
As shown last week in Washington State, the fiscal crisis of the states presents opportunities for reformers who couldn't get legislators' attention when appealing for social justice. Severe fiscal distress appears to be a remedy for drug war incarceration mania. Rock-ribbed conservatives who could listen to a hundred drug war POW horror stories without batting an eye can become reform allies when their wallets are at stake.

mrsweber253
10-16-2008, 09:51 AM
hope that helps

codasgirl04
10-16-2008, 10:22 AM
thank you for the info ~ as i am reading it, it says the VO's are not eligible for ERD, mine is a VO and his counselor says that he is getting his ERD and his house has been approved