View Full Version : Benefits for Inmates Including Monetary Disability Benefits for Ex-convicts


Sindarla
01-05-2010, 04:43 PM
My husband is currently incarcerated in Suffolk County Correctional Facility in Riverhead and he received this information, which I also found posted here on Prison Talk 5 or 6 years ago in the Dallas, Texas forum. I am currently having trouble researching this and was wondering if anyone here has any information relation to the information I have provided below. The laws quoted are all Federal laws, not state so if they are still current they would be relevant today. I'm having trouble finding some of the laws, particularly the ones related to being eligible for monetary Disability benefits. I'm not sure if those amounts of money are accurate, but if this is correct then I would think that the amounts would be more since the cost of living has gone up in the last 5 - 6 years.

The information I'm referring to is below:

For: Ex offenders

Contact(s): Social Security Office
Welfare Department
State Rehabilitation Office

What do I do? Where do I go? Who do I talk to?

Go immediately upon release to the nearest Social Security Office and ask to speak to a counselor so that you can apply for social security inurance emergency supplement benefits of $1500.00. Explain that you are emotionally and mentally unprepared to hold a job, show then your parole or mandatory release papers, in order to prove you are just out of prison. (NOTE you should receive a check within 72 hours) While at the office, fill out the necessary forms for the $310.00 monthly disability benefits for every month you were incarcerated.
Now, go to the nearest WELFARE DEPARTMENT OFFICE and apply for the GENERAL RELIEF. Again show them your parole or mandatory release papers as proof that you are just out of prison. Tell them you need financial assistance immediately! A check should be issued to you within 2 hours. It should be for approximately $150.00. Also, apply for FOOD STAMPS while you are there you should recieve about $110.00 worth while you are there be sure to obtain your medical card for health protection benefits. (NOTE this card can be used at any doctor's office)

SSI
a. $1500.00-one time payment
b. $300.00-3 months payment
c. $228.00-per month payment
d. $168.00-per month payment

VOCATIONAL
a. $1900.00-for auto expense
b. $300.00-for work clothes
c. $400.00-for casual clothes
d. $$$$$-for work tools

UPON YOUR RELEASE :
1. About two months prior to release send a letter to the regional director of the social security department asking for an application for $980.00 under SSI. Tell him you have seen and been approved for parole or your release date and city you will be living in. You can't receive benefits while in prison, but your letter serves as an application. Under RCW 74.29.205, RCW 72.02.040 and Public Law 93.365.92.603 as an ex-convict you are classified as a disadvantaged minority. (IF YOU HAVE A JOB WAITING YOU WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE FOR THIS BENEFIT)
2. Under the same citations as quoted in #1, you can write the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES in your city or county, to get a list for LOW INCOME HOUSING.
3. Upon your release if you have no job waiting you can go to the Dept. of Social Services and apply for food stamps. Approximately $180.00 is available if you qualify.
4. Even if you rent a room if your income is below a certain level you are eligible in many states for a one time a year fuel assistance payment through your social services.
5. To help you get a job in the trade in which you are qualified and the job requires tools and/or special clothing, go to the DEPARTMENT OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION.
6. If you wish to start your own business, the SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIONS can help. You must present a business plan to at least three banks and be turned down by them before approaching the SBA. The SBA can loan you up to $24,000.00 which the SBA guarantees to the bank. Under the retired businessman plan a sucessful small business owner, (who is retired) will help you formulate your business plan at no charge. They will also loan you up to $1000.00 more if a work vehicle is needed of course you must present a business plan which shows a chance for success.
7. Under the dept. of labor insurance plan, the government will ensure your bonding if needed for a job.
8. Targeted JOB TAX CREDITS is a benefit for the employers willing to hire ex-convicts. The employer will receive a $3000.00 "TAX WRITE OFF" the first year and a $1500.00 one the next. If the employer is training you in a skill the government will pay half of your wages for the first year, in addition to the tax-cut the employer receives.
9. As an ex-convict you are classified as a disadvantaged minority, thus you are eligible for vocational training schooling, as well as the benefits mentioned above. (YOU NEED TO BE AWARE OF THE FACT THAT MANY STATE AND FEDERALLY OPERATED PROGRAMS DON'T WANT TO BE BOTHERED WITH EX-CONVICTS, IN SUCH CASES ALWAYS BRING THE PROPER LAWS AND DOCUMENTS STATING YOU ARE ENTITLED TO RECEIVE THESE BENEFITS.)

DO THIS WITHIN TEN DAYS OF YOUR RELEASE
Go to the STATE REHABILITATION CENTER where you can apply for various federally funded loans and grants.
If you want to start a small business make a list of the approx. cost of all equipment you will need. (i.e. tools, work clothes, etc.) and an estimate for how much operating cash you will need to start up the business. Until it starts to make a living for you. They may loan you up to $50,000.00
If you need to be bonded for employment by a private employer you can obtain the bond from and US district Court. Go to the probation and parole department it should take less than an hour to have the validated forms in your hand. You are qualified because you are on SSI. The WELFARE DEPT. will automatically send you $228.00 per month for financial assistance and utility. SSI is the same in every state!
A. Go to the DEPT. OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION because you are on SSI
B. A convicted felon is a depressed minority. You also qualify for a certain benefit package. The amount of this package is $1900.00 to be used for a down payment on a vehicle. The car must be used to go back and forth to work.
C. You will also receive $300.00 for clothing on the job and another $400.00 for tools. These are grants and DO NOT have to be paid back.


If ANYONE has any information regarding it, PLEASE post it here and hopefully I'll see it. This information, if true would also benefit MANY inmates and their loved ones.

Thank you in advance for helping me to research this information. Everyone out there, don't be discouraged but instead continue researching (and encouraging your inmate loved ones to research) ALL laws to benefit them both in and out of jail/prison. It's a struggle/fight, but it's DEFINITELY worth it. Most lawyers (particularly Legal Aid and AT&B lawyers) Won't help you find out this information. It's frustrating for us loved ones and our inmates to do all this legal research but any positive information we discover can help both our inmates and other inmates. Don't give up!

Take Care,

Sindarla

NurseG
01-07-2010, 08:16 AM
I believe you would have to wait until your love one is actually released from whatever facility because they cannot receive SSI benefits while incarcerated. Basically if your husband is there in Riverhead and would be released from there he should go to his local Social Security office to apply for the benefits and to Welfare for whatever else like foodstamps and medicaid, also the state rehabilitation I am not to sure of but thats all say exactly what the letter say.

Sindarla
01-08-2010, 11:37 AM
My husband's NOT being released from Riverhead but rather from Upstate (prison) - hopefully Willard. He has not received his sentence yet as he keeps going back and forth every month to different court buildings. He hasn't officialy even been given an offer since he has started with his new lawyers over 1 1/2 months ago (he's been in county for 3 1/2 months so far).

Anyway, I KNOW they can accept an application for Medicaid, Food Stamps and SSI BEFORE his release date...I can get him an official application to fill out and bring it in myself BEFORE he gets released - they STILL have to give you an interview date, which can be changed one time - it usually takes 1 - 2 months for the initial eligibility interview. In thE past I applied for Medicaid for him while he was in jail/prison when it was close to his release - they didn't know where he was, they gave me a date for him to come in for the interview. Pretty much ANYONE can submit the application for someone else, as long as they supply their Social Security number and sign and date the application.

However, I'm STILL looking for information as to whether these benefits, particularly the SSI benefits exist and these laws still exist. If my husband in the end cannot apply for SSI as a disadvantaged minority as an ex-convict, he can STILL apply for his back as he has degenerative disk disease and arthritis in his back, but he'd prefer to apply as a disadvantaged minority as it seems he can get more money that way (which we NEED as I myself am on SSD and don't make enough to support my family).

Take Care,

Sindarla

Paralegal USA
01-09-2010, 05:22 PM
No such benefits by reason of incarceration only.

Sindarla
01-10-2010, 10:51 AM
If there are SPECIFIC law number then this HAS TO HAVE existed, EVEN IF it's not law now - while the monetary benefits may not exist currently, the disadvantaged minority status I believe DOES exist & helps ex-cons to get a job by helping them with money for tools, uniforms, a vehicle to & from work (IF they have a license - some parts of the country do NOT have public transportation) & bonding if needed for their job as well as tax credits to encourage employers to hire ex-cons & not discriminate against them. I used to be a paralegal myself & I KNOW that JUST BECAUSE someone's a paralegal or a lawyer doesn't mean they know ALL of the laws, there are TOO many of them & they're CONSTANTLY changing...Paralegal USA, I think you just stated your opinion WITHOUT ANY knowledge of this Or research. I'd like to hear from anybody who has knowledge of these law(s) due to their research, whether it would affect us negatively or positively, NOT Just people's opinions. I understand that after all we go through, we lose our trust in the system as loved ones of inmates. But since the government puts inmates in prison, regardless of whether they deserve to be there or not, they become unhirable after sitting there so long & the government HAS to do something to correct that problem, as a Humane society...That is, if they don't want the majority of ex-cons coming out of jail homeless, penniless & hopeless living on the street...Then there would be an EXTREMELY high number of ex-convict homeless people & that's something the government just DOESN'T want on their hands.

Irish Girl
01-10-2010, 06:33 PM
It would be great if perhaps you called Social Security and asked them, and then let us know what you find out.

Sindarla
01-11-2010, 12:29 AM
BEFORE I contact Social Security I want to have the laws in hand. I need to arm myself against their response that he doesn't qualify. By having the laws available I can quote the names of each applicable law & what each states. But it would be better to bring it in person. I currently do not have a car & I won't be going down to the Social Security office 'til 2 or 3 months before my husband comes home, hopefully that'll be in the Spring (The Social Security office is NOT close to me, it's 20 minutes by car). Now I got my new printer hooked up (which took almost 2 1/2 hours WITH the help of a customer support person at Hewlwt Packard!) I want to look each law quoted above & print out what I find for my husband & myself...And I need to bookmark what I find so I can come back here & copy & paste the links for anyone else in here who's interested in reading the info on any laws I find. Thanks for all your feedback.

Take it Easy,

Sindarla

Paralegal USA
01-11-2010, 08:11 AM
Once again, there are no SS or SSI benefits available to someone by sole virtue of their having been incarcerated. The rumor that there is has been a profitable scam for those claiming convict entitlement.

Moreover, the fact of one wanting benefits as the result of their criminality screams all of criminal bent, irresponsibility, and pure unadulterated laziness. If one is to pay more than mere lip service to a claim of being rehabilitated, it would seem they would be averse to government handouts and would be eager to work for a living, paying taxes, and in all other respects, obeying the law.

As with the woman on welfare who bears another child for the sole purpose of increasing her monthly benefit rate, it's this type of mentality - that which seeks undeserved public funding subsidized by others - that errodes the principles upon which this Country was built.

Do the sentence imposed for the crime, get out of prison, get a job, support your dependents, and pay your taxes. It is the offender who does these things who will prosper. It is the one who taxes law abiding citizens who will not.

Momma Ann
01-11-2010, 08:29 AM
We need a snopes.com for prison rumors.

"Good rumors die hard. One of the best continues to prey on inmates looking for a fresh financial start. Perhaps you've heard it. One inmate recently reported that he was told of a clause in the Social Security Administration that classifies ex-cons as "disabled" upon release. As such they could receive monthly checks in excess of $300 plus money to purchase a car.
So let's get the story straight.
Supplemental Security Income (SSI), one program of the Social Security Administration, is for people who are disabled, have limited income, or who are 65 or older. Serving time in prison does not qualify anyone as "disabled". To be considered disabled, a person must have a physical or mental condition that prevents him/her form doing any substantial work. This condition must be expected to last for at least 12 months. Depression, anxiety, stress from prison, etc., are not considered enough reason to prevent a person from working. Even if you meet these conditions, P.L. 96-473 requires suspension of Social Security benefits to disabled inmates when they become confined to a correctional facility for conviction of a felony. Statute 10105.105 forbids payment of any benefits to any prisoner who becomes disabled while in prison or who sustains a disability during the commission of felony after October 19, 1980.
No matter how much you have paid into Social Security, no inmate can receive benefits. Social Security is a program that pays benefits after you retire, become disabled, or die. The benefits that you receive after you qualify (usually your 65th birthday) depend on how long you have worked and paid into the Social Security Program.
If you were receiving benefits before your incarceration, they were automatically cut off when you entered the prison system. By law, benefits cannot be reinstated until you have been out of prison for at lease a month. Upon release, you can receive up to $200 in emergency benefits. This is an advance against your first regular check. If your parole requires you to live in a half-way house (still considered confinement) you cannot receive benefits till you are released.
If you feel that you could get SSI, you can apply for it only 30 days before your release.
Remember this: 30 DAYS.
If you apply before the 30 days, the Social Security Administration will deny your claims because you are still an inmate. Remember, no Social Security benefits are payable to inmates during incarceration.
Is there any way an inmate can receive SSA benefits upon release? Yes. [W]e spoke with the Office of Public Information, the Office of Litigation, and the Press Office. However, the benefits are for only a narrow group of folks. Frank Battistelli, an official spokesperson, was quite candid. Released prisoners who meet all of the following criteria may receive Social Security benefits:
1. The inmate is disabled according to Social Security's definition of disability. Serving time in prison is not enough reason to claim that you have an emotional disability. By definition, disabled means that the inmate is unable to engage in "substantial gainful activity." This means that:
a. The inmate is unable to work because of a physical or mental disability which has lasted for longer than 12 months, or is expected to result in death.
b. His/her disability is expected to result in death.
c. He/she is incapable of doing his/her previous work or any other substantial gainful employment, that exists in the national company.
2. The sentencing court or a subsequent court specifically approves, for that individual, a rehabilitation program.
3. Social Security must have a reasonable explanation that the inmate will have gainful employment upon release. [Please note that just because a court approves the rehabilitation program does not mean that the SSA will do so. Your work experience, skills that are relevant to the national economy, and other factors are weighed by Social Security.]
4. The prisoner must be close enough to release that once he/she is released gainful employment can be obtained within a reasonable period of time. The definition of reasonable rests solely in the hands of the Social Security Administration.
The following guidelines apply to all inmates:
If you are statutorily blind, contact Social Security. Different rules apply. If for some reason Social Security makes a mistake and does not stop your disability payments upon incarceration, you must repay the money when the error is discovered. If Social Security thinks that this was not an accident, but you knowingly made an attempt to defraud Social Security, your case will be referred to the Office Of Inspector General, who will decide whether your case should be prosecuted. If you have any questions, call this toll free number: 1-800-772-1213. Have your home zip code ready, because your call will be transferred to the Social Security office nearest you. "

False hope is the worst kind.

convictedfelons
01-11-2010, 09:28 PM
I just want to chime in and say that I think we should give the benefit of the doubt to the person who is incarcerated and is trying to get back on his/her feet. Because many employers will not hire a person who has a criminal background, and the government doesn't enforce hiring of ex-cons, there are some degrees of disability simply by the nature of the system. This inability to find work can lead anyone to have a nervous breakdown and, until you've experienced that wall in your life, you really can't relate.

I think the person who started this thread was simply asking for advice because of the desperation that is felt by many who are released especially when they can't find work that is gainful enough to support themselves, let along an entire family.

I choose to believe the people will do the right thing, for the most part. Disability benefits may be needed because the system, in its inherent nature, can cause someone to experience emotional disability for life.

Paralegal USA
01-12-2010, 10:21 AM
I just want to chime in and say that I think we should give the benefit of the doubt to the person who is incarcerated and is trying to get back on his/her feet.

Giving benefit of doubt to a convicted felon is, as you well know, a hard sell for law-abiding employers.

Because many employers will not hire a person who has a criminal background, and the government doesn't enforce hiring of ex-cons

And neither should the government force hiring of ex-cons by private companies, although it does encourage as much through tax deductions and OJT incentives.

there are some degrees of disability simply by the nature of the system.

While true is that a felony conviction may make more difficult securing gainful employment, equating a felony conviction and resulting imprisonment to a disability smacks of the "poor me" syndrome: "I committed a crime and now I can't find a job."

This inability to find work can lead anyone to have a nervous breakdown and, until you've experienced that wall in your life, you really can't relate.

Many things can lead to a nervous breakdown. The inability to deal with a divorce, or failing health of a loved one, being two classic examples. Should we give every divorcee disability payments? Should we extend disability benefits to the mother whose child is dying of cancer?

I think the person who started this thread was simply asking for advice because of the desperation that is felt by many who are released especially when they can't find work that is gainful enough to support themselves, let along an entire family.

The original poster struck me otherwise. It appeared she was determined to secure disability benefits for her husband, who is yet incarcerated, thinking he was entitled to such by sole reason of his imprisonment.

I choose to believe the people will do the right thing, for the most part. Disability benefits may be needed because the system, in its inherent nature, can cause someone to experience emotional disability for life.

I also tend to believe that most people are inclined to do the right thing, though not all; the welfare rolls abound with people who draw for no other reason than such being a free government handout.

The fact of some offenders suffering life-time emotional difficulties by reaon of their convictions and/or imprisonment serves as no basis to award them disability benefits subsidized by law abiding citizens. Should we extend disability benefits to the woman who one day realized the makeup she had been wearing for years was made with tiger urine and who now can no longer wear makeup of any sort out of fear that it too contains animal waste? Should we extend disability payments to the hiker who got himself lost in the woods for several days and who can now no longer enjoy his passion for nature for fear of getting lost again?

Most felons consciously committed their offenses, knowing before doing so that the act or acts were illegal. To later reward them for having violated the laws of society by choice would set a very dangerous and expensive precedent likely to be followed by others.

The fact of an offender experiencing difficulty securing gainful employment following release from prison and/or life-lasting emotional trauma resulting from imprisonment, are collateral consequences to committing the act that landed them behind bars. Analagous would be the life-altering collateral consequences to poor financial decisions (foreclosure resulting in having to move from a nice sprawling house in the suburbs to a studio apartment in the city; bankruptcy, credit rating destruction, etc.). In either case, the affected suffers collateral consequences as the direct result of the decisions he or she made of their own volition.

Ex-convicts are vested with the freedom of choice. They can do or become whatever they want. Just a few cases in point would be: Danny Trejo, an ex-con turned movie actor who has spent time at Folsom Prison for drug and robbery convictions, who later starred in movies such as "Con Air", "Reindeer Games", "Heat", "Spy Kids" and others; "Home Improvement" star Tim Allen who served two years in prison for selling cocaine; Chuck Berry who served four years in prison before becoming one of the greatest performers of all time, and; David Allen Coe who penned and performed the smash hits "Take This Job and Shove It" and "You Never Even Call Me By My Name". And there are many more examples to be sure. I personally know ex-cons who, following their release, became, and continue to be, inordinately successful in corporate endeavors.

If an ex-convict chooses to let the fact of his or her felony conviction and resulting imprisonment serve as the proverbial millstone to forever weight them down, that is their choice and their choice alone. They should not be supported by tax-payer subsidized government programs, provided they are physically able to work.

Sindarla
01-12-2010, 01:04 PM
I'M the one that started the thread. I started it to see whether inmates are eligible for benefits. I feel they are entitled it to what the system put them through, and whether the law says they are to be treated humanely or not doesn't mean the CO's FOLLOW the law! However, my husband DOES have a Disability, he has Degenerative Disk Disease and Arthritis in his back, which I stated in a prior post. He was in the process of applying for SSI when he became incarcerated. And he WILL apply again, either 1 month before release or maybe after he gets out with the help of a firm such as Binder & Binder. Please know that I was once a paralegal as well, I received my post-BA Legal Assistant certificate with Honors. However, I Never worked in the Criminal law field. Therefore the reason I had questions when my husband received this information.

Oh, and for the record, Paralegal USA, I did NOT claim SSD because I had a baby - I ONLY receive $750 a month and my daughter receives $169 a month as my dependent - I made more when I was working, and I NEED more to pay bills, support my family and live a more comfortable life, which is why I am looking to either start a job, preferably part-time or start an online business. Paralegal USA, you seem to have a superior attitude, like you are Above ex-cons. I have NEVER done time, but I can understand the stress they've gone through, something I know you could NEVER do. My husband's NOT looking to go on Disability long term, it's more a way to help support the family until he can either obtain gainful employment (which WILL risk the health of his back!) or work with me in an online business if I can start one soon enough. (I understand that it takes awhile to receive SSI benefits as he ALREADY was in the application process before incarceration, he did get turned down and we were in the process of appealing it. But it was very "fortunate" of the Social Security office that they "lost" his appeal paperwork.) We are NOT trying to abuse the system and we BOTH paid into the system through taxes in the past so it's not like we're trying to get money without having first paid into it.

Once again, there are no SS or SSI benefits available to someone by sole virtue of their having been incarcerated. The rumor that there is has been a profitable scam for those claiming convict entitlement.

Moreover, the fact of one wanting benefits as the result of their criminality screams all of criminal bent, irresponsibility, and pure unadulterated laziness. If one is to pay more than mere lip service to a claim of being rehabilitated, it would seem they would be averse to government handouts and would be eager to work for a living, paying taxes, and in all other respects, obeying the law.

As with the woman on welfare who bears another child for the sole purpose of increasing her monthly benefit rate, it's this type of mentality - that which seeks undeserved public funding subsidized by others - that errodes the principles upon which this Country was built.

Do the sentence imposed for the crime, get out of prison, get a job, support your dependents, and pay your taxes. It is the offender who does these things who will prosper. It is the one who taxes law abiding citizens who will not.

Paralegal USA
01-12-2010, 05:14 PM
Ex-convicts are vested with the freedom of choice. They can do or become whatever they want. Just a few cases in point would be: Danny Trejo, an ex-con turned movie actor who has spent time at Folsom Prison for drug and robbery convictions, who later starred in movies such as "Con Air", "Reindeer Games", "Heat", "Spy Kids" and others; "Home Improvement" star Tim Allen who served two years in prison for selling cocaine; Chuck Berry who served four years in prison before becoming one of the greatest performers of all time, and; David Allen Coe who penned and performed the smash hits "Take This Job and Shove It" and "You Never Even Call Me By My Name". And there are many more examples to be sure. I personally know ex-cons who, following their release, became, and continue to be, inordinately successful in corporate endeavors.

http://sports.yahoo.com/nhl/blog/puck_daddy/post/Parole-to-enroll-Mike-Danton-making-college-hoc?urn=nhl,212947

Sindarla
01-12-2010, 05:29 PM
It's NOT as easy as you make it sound to succeed after incarceration at a Correctional Facility. The people mentioned are less than 1% of those incarcerated nationwide. In fact, incarceration only breeds MORE incarceration many times, the TRUE purpose of incarceration is NOT rehabilitation - it has the Opposite effect! Being incarcerated with other individuals who have committed crimes only leads many to become a better criminal. It's ONLY with time & wisdom that many inmates can turn their lives around and not commit crimes again. A Lot (I would say a Majority) of inmates have drug problems and if they TRULY are committed to living a drug free life then I believe they should get treatment for their drug addiction so they can become a productive member of society again and no longer go back and forth to jail/prison - it's a Win Win for both the inmate and the State (so they no longer have to pay for the cost of feeding and housing the inmate).



http://sports.yahoo.com/nhl/blog/puck_daddy/post/Parole-to-enroll-Mike-Danton-making-college-hoc?urn=nhl,212947

Sindarla
01-12-2010, 05:33 PM
Paralegal USA, those ex-cons that you know that succeeded in the corporate world after their incarceration are LUCKY they were Even Hired...They just made the most of their opportunities, opportunities MANY inmates NEVER get due to their ex-convict status.


http://sports.yahoo.com/nhl/blog/puck_daddy/post/Parole-to-enroll-Mike-Danton-making-college-hoc?urn=nhl,212947

eagles48
01-12-2010, 07:22 PM
Did you ever hear of Exodus Transitional Community in Manhattan?

Paralegal USA
01-13-2010, 06:45 AM
Paralegal USA, those ex-cons that you know that succeeded in the corporate world after their incarceration are LUCKY they were Even Hired...They just made the most of their opportunities, opportunities MANY inmates NEVER get due to their ex-convict status.


They weren't hired by anyone. They started their own companies and now have others working for them.

Paralegal USA
01-13-2010, 07:34 AM
It's NOT as easy as you make it sound to succeed after incarceration at a Correctional Facility.

Achieving success is not easy for anyone, including for those who have never been convicted of a crime. It takes planning, dedication, and lots of hard work.

In fact, incarceration only breeds MORE incarceration many times, the TRUE purpose of incarceration is NOT rehabilitation - it has the Opposite effect! Being incarcerated with other individuals who have committed crimes only leads many to become a better criminal. It's ONLY with time & wisdom that many inmates can turn their lives around and not commit crimes again.

The system cannot rehabilitate anyone. Rehabilitation is the onus of the offender. If an inmate wants to learn how to become a better criminal, he/she is in a good place to learn ... from other criminals. The inmate has the choice of what to do with his/her life while incarcerated.

A Lot (I would say a Majority) of inmates have drug problems and if they TRULY are committed to living a drug free life then I believe they should get treatment for their drug addiction so they can become a productive member of society again and no longer go back and forth to jail/prison - it's a Win Win for both the inmate and the State (so they no longer have to pay for the cost of feeding and housing the inmate).

The New York prison system (and most other prison systems too) offers drug & alcohol rehabilitative programs to every inmate who has a documented history of, or who claims to have, a substance abuse problem.

As one ex-convict said to me years ago when I inquired how he became so successful after his release from years of imprisonment: "Nothing is any more impossible than I believe it to be."

nynicky
01-15-2010, 04:45 AM
DOES ANYONE KNOW HOW SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENIFITS CAN GET RE-INSTATED MY SON WILL BE RELEASED MARCH 1,2010 AND RECIEVED A LETTER HIS SS DISABILTY WILL STOP 30 DAYS AFTER THIS LETTER,DATED JAN 9,2010.IS THERE ANYTHING HE CAN DO PRIOR TO BEING RELEASED ?
ALSO SOCIAL SECURITY GIVE INCENTIVE PAYMENT OF $400.00 TO CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES WHO NOTIFY THEM OF INMATE SS NUMBERS >>>>Incentive Payments For State And Local Institutions Under Social Security Programs

brooks
01-15-2010, 12:44 PM
Have HIM write a letter to Social Security.. with the prison address. They may just be sending out their annual form letters. Any corporate communication tends to forget there are human circumstances. I always got the form letter from child support every time i filed for Med Assistance recertification.

Sindarla
01-16-2010, 10:29 AM
I looked up one of the laws listed in my original post above & it has NOTHING to do with benefits for ex-cons. I forget which one it was but I suspect the other 2 were made up since I can't find them. So I guess this was a big rumor/hoax but my husband can & will file for SSI due to the degenerative disk disease & arthritis in his back.

Thank you to those that defended me & Take Care,

Lisa

Sindarla
01-16-2010, 10:32 AM
Did you ever hear of Exodus Transitional Community in Manhattan?

No but we live in Long Island...What is it a drug treatment center? Or sorta like a halfway house for ex-cons?

Sindarla
01-16-2010, 10:40 AM
DOES ANYONE KNOW HOW SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENIFITS CAN GET RE-INSTATED MY SON WILL BE RELEASED MARCH 1,2010 AND RECIEVED A LETTER HIS SS DISABILTY WILL STOP 30 DAYS AFTER THIS LETTER,DATED JAN 9,2010.IS THERE ANYTHING HE CAN DO PRIOR TO BEING RELEASED ?
ALSO SOCIAL SECURITY GIVE INCENTIVE PAYMENT OF $400.00 TO CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES WHO NOTIFY THEM OF INMATE SS NUMBERS >>>>Incentive Payments For State And Local Institutions Under Social Security Programs

Spmeone who posted earlier to this thread (on page 1) that you can start receiving benefits again 30 days after release & receive a $200 emergency benefit in the meantime that will be taken out of your 1st check. The next business day after his release he should go to Social Security & show his paperwork showing his release date & the letter he received stating they were cutting him off due to his incarceration. Good Luck & Lucky, he'll be home soon!

Take it Easy,

Sindarla

Sindarla
01-16-2010, 10:46 AM
Achieving success is not easy for anyone, including for those who have never been convicted of a crime. It takes planning, dedication, and lots of hard work.



The system cannot rehabilitate anyone. Rehabilitation is the onus of the offender. If an inmate wants to learn how to become a better criminal, he/she is in a good place to learn ... from other criminals. The inmate has the choice of what to do with his/her life while incarcerated.



The New York prison system (and most other prison systems too) offers drug & alcohol rehabilitative programs to every inmate who has a documented history of, or who claims to have, a substance abuse problem.

As one ex-convict said to me years ago when I inquired how he became so successful after his release from years of imprisonment: "Nothing is any more impossible than I believe it to be."

I'm NOT talking about drug & alcohol programs in prison having contact with other inmates - I'm talking about if an inmate TRULY displays they want help to turn their life around then they should get a short or long term (ONLY If they provide NA and/or AA meetings EVERY day (Some long term programs do NOT!)) INpatient drud program.

Sindarla
01-23-2010, 12:28 PM
Giving benefit of doubt to a convicted felon is, as you well know, a hard sell for law-abiding employers.



And neither should the government force hiring of ex-cons by private companies, although it does encourage as much through tax deductions and OJT incentives.



While true is that a felony conviction may make more difficult securing gainful employment, equating a felony conviction and resulting imprisonment to a disability smacks of the "poor me" syndrome: "I committed a crime and now I can't find a job."



Many things can lead to a nervous breakdown. The inability to deal with a divorce, or failing health of a loved one, being two classic examples. Should we give every divorcee disability payments? Should we extend disability benefits to the mother whose child is dying of cancer?



The original poster struck me otherwise. It appeared she was determined to secure disability benefits for her husband, who is yet incarcerated, thinking he was entitled to such by sole reason of his imprisonment.



I also tend to believe that most people are inclined to do the right thing, though not all; the welfare rolls abound with people who draw for no other reason than such being a free government handout.

The fact of some offenders suffering life-time emotional difficulties by reaon of their convictions and/or imprisonment serves as no basis to award them disability benefits subsidized by law abiding citizens. Should we extend disability benefits to the woman who one day realized the makeup she had been wearing for years was made with tiger urine and who now can no longer wear makeup of any sort out of fear that it too contains animal waste? Should we extend disability payments to the hiker who got himself lost in the woods for several days and who can now no longer enjoy his passion for nature for fear of getting lost again?

Most felons consciously committed their offenses, knowing before doing so that the act or acts were illegal. To later reward them for having violated the laws of society by choice would set a very dangerous and expensive precedent likely to be followed by others.

The fact of an offender experiencing difficulty securing gainful employment following release from prison and/or life-lasting emotional trauma resulting from imprisonment, are collateral consequences to committing the act that landed them behind bars. Analagous would be the life-altering collateral consequences to poor financial decisions (foreclosure resulting in having to move from a nice sprawling house in the suburbs to a studio apartment in the city; bankruptcy, credit rating destruction, etc.). In either case, the affected suffers collateral consequences as the direct result of the decisions he or she made of their own volition.

Ex-convicts are vested with the freedom of choice. They can do or become whatever they want. Just a few cases in point would be: Danny Trejo, an ex-con turned movie actor who has spent time at Folsom Prison for drug and robbery convictions, who later starred in movies such as "Con Air", "Reindeer Games", "Heat", "Spy Kids" and others; "Home Improvement" star Tim Allen who served two years in prison for selling cocaine; Chuck Berry who served four years in prison before becoming one of the greatest performers of all time, and; David Allen Coe who penned and performed the smash hits "Take This Job and Shove It" and "You Never Even Call Me By My Name". And there are many more examples to be sure. I personally know ex-cons who, following their release, became, and continue to be, inordinately successful in corporate endeavors.

If an ex-convict chooses to let the fact of his or her felony conviction and resulting imprisonment serve as the proverbial millstone to forever weight them down, that is their choice and their choice alone. They should not be supported by tax-payer subsidized government programs, provided they are physically able to work.

Paralegal USA, in reading over your posts again, you seem to believe that ALL inmates are guilty of their crimes...Do you not REALIZE the government is corrupt, there's NO such thing of Innocent until Proven Guilty (in fact, it's Guilty until Proven Innocent!), the Police Many times set people up with NO evidence for crimes they NEVER comitted? It happens ALL the time, EVERY day!! And then there are those inmates that are Not rich and have to stay in jail awaiting trial because they cannot afford their bail and are given INCOMPETENT Legal Aid attorneys or Even AT&B attorneys who DON'T do their jobs, they DON'T work in their client's best interests, All they want to do is make a deal acceptable to the D.A. (NOT their clients!). HOW are these people "Innocent until Proven Guilty" when they are made to stay in jail and wear a jail uniform to court - SMACKS of guilt if you ask me!! (In Federal jail/court they HAVE to wear their jail uniform to court and also in New York City courts/Rikers Island and probably some other county jails.) And, FURTHERMORE, once an inmate does their time and is released, they SHOULDN'T get MORE punishment for doing the crime (whether they ACTUALLY did it or not is Another story!) by having difficulty obtaining employment (which I know is a condition of Federal probation/parole and EVEN with these circumstances AND this economy has led to people going Back to jail for this violation of Federal probation/parole - RIDICULOUS!!!) AND the stress this entails, which CAN lead to anxiety, Stemming from their imprisonment. In Fact, imprisonment Itself Can lead to an inmate becoming psychotic, ESPECIALLY if they are put in solitary with NO TV, newspapers or contact with the outside World (visits, phone calls, etc.). It takes a Mentally strong man/woman to withstand that kind of treatment and NOT come out mentally insane!! Not to mention that, contrary to what the U.S. SAYS, inmates are NOT treated humanely. (Maybe More humane than in Other countries, but Still NOT humanely.) For one example, an inmate was working in the kitchen and found food that was to be served to all the inmates, in a package stamped "NOT FIT FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION!" Now, WHAT'S with giving inmates food that is "NOT FIT FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION?" HOW is THAT humane? Then there's dealing with the C.O.'s attitudes that take their miserable life out on inmates and their loved ones who come to visit them. And they (and we) just have to take it and shut up (NOT a free country in jail/prison!) or they/we lose visiting priviledges, their property/letters, etc. just "disappear," and Worse!

brooks
01-23-2010, 04:38 PM
The government may be corrupt & the prison system has definitely got problems, but the law is still the law.

Sindarla
01-28-2010, 01:16 PM
The government may be corrupt & the prison system has definitely got problems, but the law is still the law.

The law may Still be the law, but if a person DIDN'T break the law and were set up by the cops or others, then how can you make that statement since they DIDN'T break the law? It DOES happen EVERY day ALL the time!

Paralegal USA
01-28-2010, 05:47 PM
I looked up one of the laws listed in my original post above & it has NOTHING to do with benefits for ex-cons. I forget which one it was but I suspect the other 2 were made up since I can't find them. So I guess this was a big rumor/hoax but my husband can & will file for SSI due to the degenerative disk disease & arthritis in his back.


Anyway, when my husband goes I will try to go to Downstate if allowed & if possible Before he gets to (hopefully) Willard since I live in Long Island & Downstate's Only an hour from New York city, but Willard's Six hours from my home.(http://www.prisontalk.com/forums/showthread.php?p=5197019#post5197019)

"[D]egenerative disc disease and arthritis in his back" .... and he's trying to go to Willard where he'll have to do strenuous physical workouts?

I think DOCS should know about his SSI claims, and I think SSI should know of his application for Willard.

Who are you trying to convince that you're not attempting to scam?

Momma Ann
01-29-2010, 09:49 AM
don't we all agree?

Irish Girl
01-30-2010, 07:18 AM
I just want to add that I looked up the laws quoted, the RCW laws and that stands for Revised Code of Washington State, not the United States.

Sindarla
02-02-2010, 12:15 AM
"[D]egenerative disc disease and arthritis in his back" .... and he's trying to go to Willard where he'll have to do strenuous physical workouts?

I think DOCS should know about his SSI claims, and I think SSI should know of his application for Willard.

Who are you trying to convince that you're not attempting to scam?

I'm NOT trying to scam ANYONE - I have a diagnosis & am receiving SSD due to that. My husband has NOT received SSI Yet. And Furthermore, you Apparently are NOT aware that there's a medical tier at Willard for those that Cannot do the physical components of the program. So he DOES qualofy & he's NOT scamming ANYONE!!!!!

Sindarla
02-02-2010, 12:19 AM
Irish Girl, I did too, it's RCW, the Revised Code of Washington (D.C., applies to ALL U.S. states), NOT Revised Code of Washington State. As I said, some of the laws don't exist & others do, but some have Nothing to do with Any kind of benefits for inmates. I am NOW aware that this was all a scam/rumor & inmates Cannot get SSI as a disadvantaged minority.

I would now like to end this thread.

Irish Girl
02-02-2010, 06:11 PM
I copied and pasted this from the RCW 74.29.205 cited in the text:

"Revised Code of Washington (RCW) Last Update: December 10, 2009

The Revised Code of Washington (RCW) is the compilation of all permanent laws now in force. It is a collection of Session Laws (enacted by the Legislature, and signed by the Governor, or enacted via the initiative process), arranged by topic, with amendments added and repealed laws removed. It does not include temporary laws such as appropriations acts. The official version of the RCW is published by the Statute Law Committee and the Code Reviser."

Sorry, it is Washington State laws, signed by their Governor, not Washington D.C. The entire contact us link, everything, is Olympia, Washington, not DC.

Sindarla
02-02-2010, 08:53 PM
It doesn't matter whether it's for Washington State or Washington D.C. anyway, as I stated these laws do NOT exist anyway, so PLEASE let's close this thread now? I woul've done it last night if I could've, UNFORTUNATELY this site does Not offer you the opportunity to close threads you start.

Thank You.

Sindarla