View Single Post
  #14  
Old 03-03-2017, 10:37 PM
usdb usdb is offline
Registered User
 

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: TX, USA
Posts: 11
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mamaspartan View Post
My son, an Army Captain, was convicted at Ft. Hood last April of sexual assault because his wife accused him of rape in the midst of a very nasty divorce involving a custody battle. The marriage was only 18 months long and she accused him a year after they separated and two years after the so called incident took place. Civilian authorities wouldn't even bring charges because there was no case but the Army jumped right in. We were so sure this would be an acquittal because it was a he said/she said situation but we found out at the trial that was not the case. It became very obvious that everything she said was automatically believed and he was expected to prove his innocence rather than the other way around. The Army also provided her with an attorney, a victim's advocate, and of course the prosecutors were also on her side. My son had a military defense attorney and a civilian lawyer we paid for. I am still in a state of shock over the outcome and am worried about my son's mental health. He is so depressed.

Any advice you can give me would be much appreciated. For instance, did you have a civilian lawyer for the appeal? How long did the appeal take? My son's record of trial hasn't even been released yet and it's been 9 months!
Unfortunately, as I have found out since 1981, there is no such thing as justice in the military "justice" system. I have been out on parole for almost 24 years without a single blemish. US Probation has tried for 8 years to have me released from parole through AF Clemency and Parole Board. Not only did the AFCPB not grant clemency, they added a restitution clause to a Parole Agreement that has been in force since 1 Apr 93. (I get the irony of the date). I would not expect any type of rational fairness from the military.

For me, I'm going to fight them, legally and administratively, until I'm dead, or I see them removed from their porcelain towers.

They are rude (ask my PO), vulgar (ask my attorney), and the poorest examples of a government employee. Angry, no. Determined, you bet.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to usdb For This Useful Post:
Grace2009 (03-04-2017)