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Old 09-22-2004, 02:49 AM
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Default Dunedin Prison New Zealand

Dunedin Prison

Background

Dunedin Prison was built in 1896 and after renovation it became the National Women's Prison in 1959. During most of the intervening period it was used by the Police and Defence departments. It closed in May 1974 when the new women's prison opened in Christchurch. It then re-opened as a male prison in February 1975.

Dunedin Prison is very small, holding up to 59 medium security male inmates. It accommodates inmates on remand, local men serving short sentences and those awaiting transfer to other prisons. The small size of the prison limits inmate employment facilities and precludes placement of long-term inmates there.

Christchurch (formerly Paparua), Christchurch Women's, Rolleston, Dunedin and Invercargill prisons together form the South Island prison region.
Sentence management

The Department of Corrections provides a structured and integrated approach to managing offenders.

On arrival at prison, each inmate is assessed according to their risk of re-offending, the causes and influences of their offending behaviour, and their willingness to change. The assessment also looks at educational needs, health needs, special needs, and security risks.

A sentence plan is drawn up based on this assessment, focusing on giving the offender opportunities to break the cycle of re-offending. The plan may include programmes aimed at giving inmates the skills to deal with challenges they may face when they return to the community, such as budgeting, employment and relationships.

The process allows for the most appropriate form of intervention to be targeted to each offender. Interventions range from providing education and a career start for young offenders, to providing intensive programmes to those offenders motivated to address the causes of their offending.

Corrections has a strategy in place to minimise harm caused by drug use. The strategy aims to reduce the supply and demand of drugs in prison and the crime associated with it. To achieve the strategy, some of the methods used include visitor searches, vehicle checkpoints, use of drug dogs, a national 0800 JAILSAFE phone line, gathering crime related intelligence, liaison with the Police, and Alcohol and Drug inmate rehabilitation programmes.

All New Zealand prisons provide medical, dental, psychological and counselling services. Chaplains provide church services and Bible study groups.
Rehabilitation

The Department of Corrections has a range of programmes to improve motivation to change, address educative or employment needs or specifically address what drives an offender's offending behaviour.

Dunedin Prison offers a limited number of programmes because of its small size and the actual needs of the small number of eligible sentenced offenders it accommodates.

The following programmes are offered at Dunedin Prison:

* National Certificate in Employment Skills (NCES) - designed to improve the basic literacy and numeracy levels of inmates.
* Adult Literacy.

Some inmates may participate in constructive activities such as yoga, smoking cessation, studying for a driver's licence, creative writing and art classes. A Tawhirimatea Wanaga course, which covers Tikanga Maori principles, is also offered.
Employment

Work is primarily related to self-sufficiency functions at the prison and inmates receive a small incentive for the work they do.

Inmates may be employed to service the prison's kitchen, cleaning and laundry.

Suitable inmates also participate in the Release to Work Programme. The programme is designed for inmates serving their last months in prison, who are released to work during the day in ordinary jobs in the community.

For more information about inmate employment please ask for the Corrections Inmate Employment fact sheet.
Education

A full-time teacher is employed to co-ordinate and provide educational programmes to the inmates. Suitable inmates may also be paroled to attend the local Polytechnic, University or Cameron Centre.

The National Certificate in Employment Skills is available to inmates at Dunedin Prison. This is a pre-employment qualification which offers learning in a range of work-related skills, including basic literacy and numeracy. NCES is recognised by many industry areas throughout New Zealand. The focus is on improving the educational level of inmates to assist them in gaining future employment.
Returning to the community

The Department believes the successful reintegration of offenders into the community provides the best protection for society. The Department aims to provide offenders with the skills, knowledge and confidence to live successfully in the community in order to reduce their likelihood of re-offending, and a range of reintegrative services is available.
Reintegrative needs are assessed at the start of an offender's sentence, and reviewed throughout. There are seven reintegrative objectives that can be planned for. These are:

* finding a job
* finding somewhere to live
* budgeting effectively
* managing relationships
* developing positive community support
* preventing victim-related problems
* keeping healthy.

There are three levels of assistance, with all offenders receiving "level one" self-help. This includes contact details of organisations that can help them re-settle once they have left prison, and access via case officers to a knowledge base. Some offenders will require greater support from their case officer, and further referral can be made to other specialist staff (such as a social worker) or external agencies (eg. NZPARS) who can provide more in-depth support and advice.

For those who do not have the skills to live independently on release, a further level of support is available through reintegrative programmes and/or living in self-care units. These are scheduled for near the end of their period in prison.

Three reintegrative programmes have been developed:

* Living Skills - a 36-hour broad-based programme to give offenders skills and knowledge across most reintegrative areas
* Budgeting Skills - a 10-hour group programme aimed at offenders with specific budgeting and money needs
* Parenting Skills - a 32-hour group programme designed to meet parenting skills needs.

While these programmes are not yet available at all prisons, it is anticipated they will be fully operational by 2004. All three programmes have been designed to meet the specific needs of Maori, Pacific Peoples, women and youth.
Future plans

There are plans to replace Dunedin Prison and build a new 330-bed men's corrections facility near Milton, for inmates from the Otago region. Dependant on planning approvals, this new prison is likely to open in 2006.
General information

Dunedin Prison Telephone (03) 474 7300
P O Box 584 Fax (03) 477 1672
DUNEDIN

The Site Manager is Mike Anderson.

Dunedin Prison is in Lower High Street next to the Courts Building, opposite the Railway Station. The prison is on the main bus route.
Main visiting times

Classification

Day

Time

Remand inmates

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday

1.00pm - 3.45pm

Sentenced

Sunday

9.00am - 11.00am
1.00pm - 3.45pm

Please note: Visitors should ensure they have a visit time booked with the prison and a letter from the prison confirming this visiting time. Visitors arriving at the prison will be asked by staff to produce their letter of approval, sent prior to the visit, and a form of identification. Other arrangements to visit can be made in special circumstances. Staff may also ask to search the visitor's possessions or the visitor. On occasions, visitors' cars may be searched (at Dunedin Prison this is usually carried in liaison with the Police).

On occasions a Public Prisons Service drug dog is used as an aid to detect drugs and other contraband being brought into the prison. All visitors are also required to produce proof of identity and may be required to undergo a search by a Corrections Officer using a metal detector.

Hawke's Bay Prison

Background

Hawke's Bay Regional Prison opened in October 1989. The old Napier prison closed in 1993.

The main prison performs a remand and receiving function. The minimum to high-medium security prison is made up of a medium security section, housing 180 male inmates in three separate units, and five cell hut complexes, housing 377 inmates. This includes a Youth Unit holding 17 male inmates, and a 20 bed self-care unit. There is also a Maori Focus Unit.

The prison generally accommodates 32 remand inmates and has a maximum capacity of 568 male inmates.

New Plymouth, Wanganui, Manawatu and Hawke's Bay Prisons together form the Midland prison region.
Sentence management

The Department of Corrections provides a structured and integrated approach to managing offenders.

On arrival at prison, each inmate is assessed according to their risk of re-offending, the causes and influences of their offending behaviour, and their willingness to change. The assessment also looks at educational needs, health needs, special needs, and security risks.

A sentence plan is drawn up based on this assessment, focusing on giving the offender opportunities to break the cycle of re-offending. The plan may include programmes aimed at giving inmates the skills to deal with challenges they may face when they return to the community, such as budgeting, employment and relationships.

The process allows for the most appropriate form of intervention to be targeted to each offender. Interventions range from providing education and a career start for young offenders, to providing intensive programmes to those offenders motivated to address the causes of their offending.

Corrections has a strategy in place to minimise harm caused by drug use. The strategy aims to reduce the supply and demand of drugs in prison and the crime associated with it. To achieve the strategy, some of the methods used include visitor searches, vehicle checkpoints, use of drug dogs, a national 0800 JAILSAFE phone line, gathering crime related intelligence, liaison with the Police, and Alcohol and Drug inmate rehabilitation programmes.

All New Zealand prisons provide medical, dental, psychological and counselling services. Chaplains provide church services and Bible study groups.
Rehabilitation

A range of programmes has been developed either to improve motivation to change, address educative or employment needs or specifically address what drives an offender's offending behaviour.

The following programmes are offered at Hawke's Bay Prison:

* Straight Thinking - designed to assist offenders to address one of the main causes of their offending - the lack of critical reasoning required to live effectively in society.
* National Certificate in Employment Skills (NCES) - designed to improve the basic literacy and numeracy levels of inmates.
* Substance Abuse programmes - designed to address an offenders' substance abuse when it is one of the main contributing causes of their offending.
* Violence Prevention - group-based treatment for violent offenders.
* EQUIP - a treatment programme provided in specialist youth units for young people with anti-social behaviour problems.
* Youth Education - delivered to inmates within the youth units and is usually NCES or high school subjects.
* Maori Therapeutic Programmes - a rehabilitative programme delivered in the Maori Focus Units, specifically developed for Maori and delivered in a wananga style.
* Tikanga Maori - designed to address re-offending from a Maori philosophy, values, knowledge and practices perspective.
* ESOL - currently a Pacific Island focussed course to raise numeracy and literacy in English.


Returning to the community

The Department believes the successful reintegration of offenders into the community provides the best protection for society. The Department aims to provide offenders with the skills, knowledge and confidence to live successfully in the community in order to reduce their likelihood of re-offending, and a range of reintegrative services is available.
Reintegrative needs are assessed at the start of an offender's sentence, and reviewed throughout. There are seven reintegrative objectives that can be planned for. These are:

* finding a job
* finding somewhere to live
* budgeting effectively
* managing relationships
* developing positive community support
* preventing victim-related problems
* keeping healthy.

There are three levels of assistance, with all offenders receiving "level one" self-help. This includes contact details of organisations that can help them re-settle once they have left prison, and access via case officers to a knowledge base. Some offenders will require greater support from their case officer, and further referral can be made to other specialist staff (e.g. a social worker) or external agencies (eg. NZPARS) who can provide more in depth support and advice.

For those who do not have the skills to live independently on release, a further level of support is available through reintegrative programmes and/or living in self-care units. These are scheduled for near the end of their period in prison.
Three reintegrative programmes have been developed:

* Living Skills - a 36-hour broad-based programme to give offenders skills and knowledge across most reintegrative areas
* Budgeting Skills - a 10-hour group programme aimed at offenders with specific budgeting and money needs
* Parenting Skills - a 32-hour group programme designed to meet parenting skills needs.
While these programmes are not yet available at all prisons, it is anticipated they will be fully operational by 2004. All three programmes have been designed to meet the specific needs of Maori, Pacific Peoples, women and youth.

Employment

Inmates have the opportunity to take part in various employment initiatives including horticulture and forestry. Other on-site industries include kitchen and laundry work, asset maintenance, farm labouring, grounds, saw-milling and joinery. The joinery workshops are in the medium secure area and the Youth Unit.

Inmate labour is also supplied, under strict staff supervision, for outside community service projects. Work skills and work parole are available to selected inmates who fulfil the legal requirements. Work parole is an integral part of the inmates' management plan. Inmates receive a small incentive for the work they do.
Education

The prison provides a range of educational programmes for inmates with a team of tutors. Each week 2 volunteer tutors also visit the prison, and work one-on-one with inmates to assist with their education.

The National Certificate in Employment Skills is available to inmates at Hawke's Bay Regional Prison. This is a pre-employment qualification which offers learning in a range of work related skills, including basic literacy and numeracy. NCES is recognised by many industry areas throughout New Zealand. The focus is on improving the educational level of inmates to assist them in gaining future employment. The prison also offers a basic computer literacy course.
Special units

Maori Focus Unit
The Department's first Maori Focus Unit opened at Hawke's Bay Regional Prison in December 1997. The unit builds on programmes that seek to bring about changes in behaviour using Maori values and disciplines.

The prison's Maori Focus Unit receives considerable support from iwi in the Hawke's Bay and East Coast region. The support of kaumatua, kuia and others, including the prison's Maori health provider, is invaluable in addressing the offending needs of Maori from a Maori perspective.

Four further Maori focus units have opened at Rimutaka, Waikeria, Tongariro/Rangipo and Wanganui Prisons. All are modelled on the unit at Hawke's Bay Regional Prison and more are planned.

Self-care accommodation
Hawke's Bay Regional Prison runs self-care accommodation. The self-care units enable 20 selected minimum-security inmates to re-establish basic living skills and individual responsibility to help them prepare for release into the community.


Youth Unit
The Department's first specialist Youth Unit opened at Hawke's Bay Regional Prison in October 1999. The unit is one of four regional specialist youth units which accommodate youth under 18 and those aged under 20 who have been assessed as vulnerable.

The youth unit is part of the Department's strategy to address problems relating to the safe, humane containment and re-offending of vulnerable young male inmates.
General information

Hawkes Bay Prison
Private Bag 1600
NAPIER

Telephone (06) 870 9700
Fax (06) 870 9720
Site Manager Walker Manaena

Hawkes Bay Regional Prison is located south of Hastings City, about 8km south of Stortford Lodge in Mangaroa Road.
Visiting times

Classification

Day

Time

Unit 1H

Friday

1pm - 3pm

Unit 1J
Unit 2K

Wednesday
Thursday

1pm - 3pm
1pm - 3pm

Unit 2L

Wednesday

1pm - 3pm

Unit 2A
Unit 5

Monday, Wednesday Thursday, Friday
Saturday

1pm - 3pm
9.30 am - 2.30 pm

Unit 4, 6, 7, 8

Saturday & Sunday

1pm - 3.30pm

Self Care & Youth

Saturday & Sunday

1pm - 3.30pm

Please note: Visitors should ensure that they have a visit time booked with the prison and a letter from the prison confirming this visiting time. Visitors arriving at the prison will be asked by staff to produce their letter of approval, sent prior to the visit, and a form of indentification. Other arrangements to visit can be made in special circumstances. Staff may also ask to search a visitor's car, possessions or the visitor.

On occasions the prisons drug dog is used as an aid to detect drugs and other contraband being brought into the prison. All visitors are also required to produce proof of identity and may be required to undergo a search by an officer using a metal detector.
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