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CDCR - What You Need to Know Information relating to the California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation. Q&A for those new to the CDCR system should be posted here.

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Old 01-21-2016, 12:04 PM
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Default The Youth Parole Hearing Process, SB260/261 and AB1308

To Our PTO Members,

This Thread is dedicated to educate and assist our members and their love ones who qualify under the sb260/sb261. I researched and gathered a few helpful tips on the parole process and how our love ones can be prepared in advance.


LIFER HEARING PAROLE SUITABILITY AND PREPARATION TIPS

Penal Code 3041 states that parole shall normally be granted to life term
inmates unless they pose a current “unreasonable risk of danger” if released. This
means parole is the rule (at least 50% of lifers who go to hearing should be granted
parole). Though things have improved dramatically since Lawrence came down in
2008 -- the grant rate since has risen steadily (from 1990-2008 it was 3%; it is now
about 25%, and Governor Brown is reversing fewer of them (about 15%) than his
three predecessors (over 75%) -- it is still far less than 50%). The Governor and the
Board get away with this because the California Supreme Court rewrote parole law
to give them nearly unlimited discretion over parole and by concocting the woefully
inadequate, nearly toothless "some evidence" standard for reviewing parole
decisions, effectively handcuffing courts from overturning those decisions.
Because it is in this rigged casino that you are trying to win your freedom,
you must know the law, how the Board, Governor, and courts apply/misapply it,
and make your prison programming/parole plans so excellent and your insight into,
responsibility and remorse for (IR&R) the Life Crime so complete and genuine that
the Board, Governor, or courts cannot concoct any reasons for denying you parole.
I hope this pamphlet will help you accomplish this. It is derived from my
experience representing 1000+ lifers at parole hearings and in writ petitions in
court.

INSIGHT, RESPONSIBIILTY, & REMORSE (IR&R)To earn parole, you must convince the Board (and Governor) you have insight
into, accept full responsibility and feel genuine remorse for your life crime. You can
show IR&R during your psych evaluation, by writing an insight statement to give/read to
the Board/psychologist, and/or a letter of remorse to the victim/VNOKs (even if you have
no plans to send it), and/or by expressing it verbally at the hearing.



TIPS FOR DISCUSSING IR&R.- Do not minimize your role in the life crime, even if it was minimal (i.e. you just drove
the car, you weren’t the shooter). Accept full responsibility (tell the Board you are just as
guilty as the shooter) where appropriate. Let your attorney argue as a matter of law you
are less culpable, which is necessary for an effective proportionality argument (below).
- Don’t blame external factors, such as abusive family background, drug abuse, poverty.
- You can say these factors contributed to the life crime, but make clear that you
were responsible for your actions (i.e., you chose to get high that day/join the gang).
- To show insight, explain what you’ve learned in prison about why you committed the
life crime and why you won’t re-offend if released. If possible, use an example of how
you properly handled a recent situation that you would have handled poorly on the
streets, based upon what you’ve learned in prison (i.e., you avoided a fight on the yard
you would have gotten into years ago by using techniques you learned in anger
management).
- Remorse means feeling bad about your crimes as well as understanding the suffering
and pain you caused. But it must come from the heart. Don’t over-intellectualize remorse.
- Prepare a letter to the victim/family. CDCR’s Office of Victim & Survivor Rights and
Services no longer accepts these letters due to budget cuts. So bring a copy to the hearing.
- A Step 8 list of all the people you’ve harmed is another great way to show remorse.
- Performing volunteer/charitable work and/or making contributions to charity are great
ways to show remorse by showing you making amends. Do as much of this as possible!
- Know your victim(s) name(s). They are the real victims, not you. Only after showing
remorse for them, is it okay to mention how the crime has impacted you/your family.
- Try to learn as much as you can about the victim and his/her family and how your crime
impacted them (but obviously not the kinds of details that would make the Board think
you plan to go after them if you are released). The Board may ask you what you know
about the victim and how you think your crime has impacted his family and you'd better
be prepared with good answers.
- A written IR&R statement and/or remorse letter can be a powerful way to show IR&R
(and to counter in court a finding by the Board or Governor that you lack it.)
- Before the hearing, give copies to the Panel and DA to review (and quiz you on
at the hearing). At the hearing, have them marked as Exhibits/attached to the transcript).
- the Board now has a 20 page limit on inmate writings that may be
submitted the day of the hearing. So be sure to submit your parole portfolio to your
counselor and/or the prison Lifer Desk well (at least two weeks) before the hearing.


- Evidence of your IR&R from psych evals/prior hearings should be read into the record.
- Don’t just mouth clichés like “I was young and stupid”. Really think about this and dig
deep into yourself to find answers (both external – what was going on in your life prior to
and at the time of the crime – and internal – what was it about your psychological
makeup and mental state at the time that caused you to commit the life crime.
- In preparing for the hearing, review your prior hearing transcripts, the statement of facts
in the POR/appellate opinion, and past psych evaluations and Board reports to see what
you've said about your life crime. Be prepared to explain any inconsistencies between
prior statements you’ve made and your present version of the life crime.
- There is no such thing as an “official” version of the life crime. By law, the appellate
opinion sets forth the facts of the crime MOST FAVORABLE TO THE PROSECUTION
and the POR contains mostly hearsay and unsworn statements (that are often wrong). Yet
the Board, Governor, and courts generally treat these documents as gospel truth and will
use significant variances between them and your version of the crime to deny you for
minimizing, failing to take full responsibility, or lacking insight.
- Object at the hearing to their use as “official” versions of the crime and to using
differences between them and your version to by themselves show that you lack IR&R.
Before Shaputis II I normally advised my clients NOT to discuss the FACTS of the
crime. But Shaputis II gives the Board the right if you refuse to discuss the life crime or
IR&R at the hearing to use earlier statements you've made about it to deny you parole if
those statements were problematic. As a result, unless there exist very good reasons not
to, you should discuss the facts of the life crime, or at minimum, inconsistent statements
you’ve made about it or significant differences between the "official" version and your
version. You should also discuss IR&R. To not do so could spell disaster.

III. PAST CRIMINAL RECORDWhile in denying parole the Board may cite your “escalating pattern of
criminality”, as static factors your priors generally are no longer important absent a nexus
to current dangerousness. However, the Board will weigh your responses to its questions
about your priors to see if you truly accept responsibility for them and, if it believes you
are minimizing them, will try to connect that minimization to possible minimizing of the
life crime to create the nexus to current dangerousness.
So be prepared. During your Olsen Review check all documents to ensure they are
accurate. Prior to the hearing go over your past record (it might be wise to write it down)
and make sure you know it cold, including the disposition (i.e., dismissed, sentenced to
jail, given probation) of each charge. This will make it easier for you to answer the
Board’s questions about it and challenge any inaccuracies. Admit priors you did commit.
And remember, you are being judged on your credibility. No matter how honest a
mistake you make about your priors, it will lessen your credibility with the Board.
Three other things to remember: 1) Use of arrests that did not result in a conviction is
improper (although the Board will often ask, especially if you were in a gang, about
crimes you committed without being caught); 2) Usually, only crimes of serious violence
are relevant to parole suitability; and 3) A minor criminal record is a factor favoring
suitability; Make sure you/your attorney cite the law correctly on these points.


IV. UNSTABLE SOCIAL HISTORY/SIGNIFICANT STRESS IN YOUR LIFE

These are hard factors to comprehend. The Board often cites unstable social
history (USH) as a basis for denial, even though abuse you suffered at home, hardships
you were subjected to, past substance abuse, or an unstable relationship with the victim,
are not by law evidence of USH. On the other hand, the existence of significant stress in
your life at the time of the life crime (i.e., severe family or emotional turmoil) is a factor
the Board is required to consider and weigh IN FAVOR of granting you parole.
If this sounds contradictory and confusing, that’s because it is. But you need to be
aware of the contradiction and (if you speak to the panel about this) answer questions
about your social history honestly and completely. Do not try to make your past sound
better or worse than it was, or try to play up or downplay the stress in your life at the time
of the life crime, because you do not know whether or not it will help or hurt you.


B. POST-CONVICTION FACTORS

I. PRISON DISCIPLINARY RECORD

Your prison behavior is obviously an important factor in determining your
suitability. If you have a recent CDC-115, regardless of what for, the Board will almost
certainly deny you. Though not a formal rule, many Board members will automatically
give you a denial if you have a 115 within 3 years of your hearing. Others use 5 years.
Most inmates who receive parole have exceptional disciplinary records. Some
have no 115s at all. Those who do have none recently. 128(a)s are also viewed negatively
by the Board. A recent court case allowed the Board to deny parole solely because the
inmate recently received a 128, even though per established case law 128s are not
discipline for unsuitability purposes. It was a ridiculous decision, but it is arguably good
law (although it would seem that there would need to be a nexus between the conduct that
led to the 128 and the conduct that led to the life crime). In any case be very careful.
Even if you are granted parole, for every year you had a 115 you will not be given
four months good time credit when the Board calculates your release date. So if you have
three years in which you received a 115 you will in essence serve an extra year in prison.
While the Board should differentiate between major 115s (i.e., violence,
substance abuse, threatening staff) and minor ones (i.e., out of bounds, reporting late to
work) it usually doesn't with recent 115s. This may not be proper (and there are cases
saying it isn’t), but they do it. Make sure to make the proper objections to this at your
hearing.


STAY AWAY FROM CELL PHONES!!!

The Board takes cell phone 115s very, very seriously and a cell phone 115 could kill your shot at being paroled for years. Also, it is
now a crime for an inmate to possess a cell phone, so you could also end up having a
consecutive sentence for this tacked on to your prison time. Whatever your reasons for
using the cell phone, IT ABSOLUTELY, POSITIVELY AIN'T WORTH IT!

*******IMPORTANT***********

II. SELF-HELP/THERAPY PROGRAMS

SIGN UP AND ATTEND AS MANY PROGRAMS AS ARE AVAILABLE!!!
(But quality means more than quantity. If you cannot articulate what you've learned
from each program you take, all the certificates and chronos in the world won't matter.)
This is vital. The Board wants to know that you are working hard to rehabilitate
yourself. By attending self-help/therapy programs ("SH/T") you can gain the knowledge
to develop IR&R into the crime and in the Board’s eyes be rehabilitated. Inmates who
receive dates can show the Board years of SH/T, particularly in substance abuse (if you
had a substance abuse problem), anger management, and victims awareness. And they
will deny you parole if they don't think you've taken enough SH/T or haven't
internalized the programs. So do SH/T and do it well, and be able to tell the Board (and
the psychologists) what you've learned from each program you've taken! If you've taken
AA or NA, you must know the 12 Steps – the Board will test you by asking you to recite
them in random order, tell which steps you are working on, or which is your favorite. If
you can’t answer easily and correctly, they will question your sincerity in attending,
giving them an excuse to deny you. DON’T GIVE IT TO THEM!
If there is no SH/T available, enroll in a correspondence course, get self-help books from
the prison library or have your family order them for you from an on-line bookstore, read
and do book reports on them to bring to the hearing. Be prepared to discuss the books
with the Board. If you read scriptures, let the Board know which portions you read and
what you learned from them.
Keep a journal documenting your self-help attendance and individual studies (it’s
a great idea to document all of your prison programming and parole plans). Bring copies
to the hearing for the Board. It shows diligence and discipline, qualities the Board favors.
SH/T is not always necessary. If your psychological evaluation says you do not
need more of it, the Board acts illegally in stating that you do as a basis for denial. Make
sure you or your attorney makes the appropriate arguments and objections on the record.
III. PSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATION
Since Lawrence held evidence of a present serious psychiatric condition and/or
lack of insight MAY constitute the nexus necessary to find you currently dangerous, to
have a real shot at parole, you want a violence risk rating of “low”. Any higher rating, i.e.
“moderate”, and the Board will often say the psych eval isn’t [totally] supportive of
release and will cite it as a basis for denial. And it will likely work.
IN MY OPINION, any rating of “moderate” or lower supports release, especially if
the doctor finds that you do not have a major mental illness (i.e., schizophrenia), or
a diagnosis of Anti-Social Personality Disorder. Be sure to argue it that way. FAD
admits that a "moderate" rating for a lifer is equivalent to a "low" risk for a
determinate term inmate. Be sure to argue this as well.
You must treat the psych eval like a Board hearing: fully discuss the life crime,
your past history, and IR&R in detail. A psychologist’s opinion that you have good IR&R
for the life crime is very helpful. A finding that you lack IR&R is usually devastating.
Getting a favorable rating does not guarantee a parole grant, even though the
California Supreme Court has held that the Board acts arbitrarily and capriciously in
ignoring a well-reasoned psych evaluation. So, if the evaluation is based upon solid
analysis – which is not always the case – and the Board ignores a favorable risk rating, it
will give you a fighting chance at winning a writ petition challenging the denial.
Many, but not all, of the Board's psychologists are incompetent and/or biased
against you. Further, the Board is not following its own rules for when an error in the
evaluation mandates that you be given a new one. But on the bright side, effective
January 1, 2016, the Board will be giving you a new comprehensive psych evaluation
every three years or prior to your next hearing, whichever comes first. There will be no
more updated evals every three years with a full one only every five years. Hopefully,
this will improve the quality of the risk assessments.
Given the bias of many of the Board's psychologists, many of the you will have to
make a tough decision: attend the evaluation or refuse. Neither option is especially appealing:


IV. PAROLE PLANS

While having viable parole plans is a factor showing suitability for parole, LACK
OF PAROLE PLANS IS NOT A FACTOR SHOWING UNSUITABILITY.
Nevertheless, the Board does deny parole for lack of parole plans and while you could
fight this in court, it is in your best interests to have solid parole plans.
1. Support letters and what they contain are important.
- Because documents get lost, they should be addressed to the Board's Lifer Desk
at your prison; copies should be sent to you and your lawyer.
- They MUST be DATED, SIGNED and contain the writer’s contact information.
- They should be RECENT. Letters over 1 year old should be updated.
- They should state what support the writer is offering you (i.e., financial,
spiritual, emotional) to help you become a productive citizen in society
- They should state (if true) that you have expressed remorse for the crime
and empathy for the victim and his/her family.
- They should state (if true) how the writer has seen you change for the better
since incarceration (the more knowledge the letter shows of who you were, are, and what
you’ve been doing in prison (including being able to identify some of your more
noteworthy accomplishments) the better.
- They should state (if true) that the writer feels remorse for your crime and
empathy for victim/family.
2. Residence
a. You need a letter offering you a place to live.
b. You only need one residence offer, but can submit more. But make clear which
is primary and which is backup.
8
c. Residence in your old neighborhood may not be acceptable, especially if you
appealing: if you attend, you stand a strong chance of getting screwed; if you don’t attend
the Board will hold it against you (and Shaputis II gives them cover for doing so).
The decision is dependent upon the specific facts of your case, so it is imperative
that you and your attorney discuss the matter and arrive at a decision how to handle the
situation if it arises. And if you do attend and do get screwed, make sure that your
attorney makes the proper objections to the evaluation.
Finally, you have the right to attach a rebuttal to the evaluation stating your
objections to it, such as bias or factual errors. It is essential that you do this so that the
Board, the Governor (and a reviewing court) will have access to your side of it.
If you do receive an unfavorable evaluation, you will need to decide what to do.
Some of the issues to consider are: are there enough factual errors or at least one really
significant error in the evaluation that you can have it invalidated; do you obtain an
independent psychological evaluation to counter the Board’s evaluation (if you have the
money); and if you can afford one do you have it done right away and go to your hearing
as scheduled, or do you waive the hearing for a year or so and have the evaluation done
just prior to the rescheduled hearing (so the evaluation is not simply a recent rebuttal to
the Board’s evaluation, but is also based on at least a year of growth and hopefully good
programming). These pros and cons are individualized, so I cannot advise you on it in
this pamphlet. Make sure to discuss them with your attorney.

IV. PAROLE PLANS
While having viable parole plans is a factor showing suitability for parole, LACK
OF PAROLE PLANS IS NOT A FACTOR SHOWING UNSUITABILITY.
Nevertheless, the Board does deny parole for lack of parole plans and while you could
fight this in court, it is in your best interests to have solid parole plans.
1. Support letters and what they contain are important.
- Because documents get lost, they should be addressed to the Board's Lifer Desk
at your prison; copies should be sent to you and your lawyer.
- They MUST be DATED, SIGNED and contain the writer’s contact information.
- They should be RECENT. Letters over 1 year old should be updated.
- They should state what support the writer is offering you (i.e., financial,
spiritual, emotional) to help you become a productive citizen in society
- They should state (if true) that you have expressed remorse for the crime
and empathy for the victim and his/her family.
- They should state (if true) how the writer has seen you change for the better
since incarceration (the more knowledge the letter shows of who you were, are, and what
you’ve been doing in prison (including being able to identify some of your more
noteworthy accomplishments) the better.
- They should state (if true) that the writer feels remorse for your crime and
empathy for victim/family.
2. Residence
a. You need a letter offering you a place to live.
b. You only need one residence offer, but can submit more. But make clear which
is primary and which is backup.
8
c. Residence in your old neighborhood may not be acceptable, especially if you
have past gang affiliation or it is too close to the victim/ VNOKs ). In these situations, try
to get residence offers outside your old neighborhood.
d. Offers should include assurances their home is alcohol, drug, and weapon free.
e. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO PAROLE TO THE COUNTY OF
COMMITMENT. By law you can parole to any county in California where you will
have the best chance to succeed on parole, which is the county where you will reside,
work, and/or where most of your support group reside.
f. You will likely have problems obtaining permission to parole out of state before
being given a parole date. As a result, you should obtain a residence in California where
you can live until your out-of-state transfer request is processed.
g. Even if you have a residence offer from family/friends, seriously consider (at
least for the first few months to a year) residence in a halfway house or sober living home
(particularly if you have any past history of substance abuse and/or the risk assessment in
your psych eval is contingent upon you remaining drug and alcohol free). This will go a
long way towards assuaging the Board’s concern that you may relapse upon release.
- Even though the Department of Adult Parole Operations is now assisting
lifers in finding transitional housing as their release dates approach, it is much
better to have at least one acceptance in writing at the time of your hearing. Ask
your counselor or attorney for information. There are plenty of them out there; if
you make the effort, you should be able to get an acceptance from at least one.
3. Job Offer/Marketable Skills
a. Having EITHER a job offer or marketable skills satisfies the factor favoring
suitability. Object if the Board tries to hold otherwise.
b. The job can be anything. It can be a business owned by family or friends.
c. The job offer should be on company letterhead, dated and signed, with the
company’s address and phone number, expressly offering you a job upon
release. It should include a description of your job title, duties, salary or rate
of pay, benefits, opportunities for promotions.
d. One job offer is sufficient, but more than one never hurts.
e. Your marketable skill can come from a vocation or prison job, or even from a
job you had on the street. Object if the Board says otherwise.
f. Finding a job on the outside is not easy. However, showing the Board that
you are trying to find one is easy. Prepare a resume and bring it to show the
Board at your hearing. Bring copies of all letters you sent out looking for a
job and any responses you’ve received.
g. If you get an offer of residence from a halfway house, sober living home, etc.,
these often include offers of employment, help finding employment, and job
training. This will solve two problems at once.
4. Relapse Prevention Plan ("RPP"): THIS IS CRITICAL, ESPECIALLY FOR
INMATES WHOSE LIFE CRIMES WERE A RESULT OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE.
a. The Board wants you to have a RPP and may deny parole if you don’t have a
solid one. The Board's psychologists are recommending RPPs for inmates with past
substance abuse, anger, impulsivity, or gang issues, raising the violence risk rating on inmates who don’t have one, and stating that such inmates can lower their risks of
violence ratings by developing one.
Nothing in the suitability regulations requires a RPP. IN MY OPINION, you are
better off developing one than fighting about it with the Board or in court. If you do not
know how to prepare one talk to your AA instructor or a knowledgeable member about
how to do so. And if the psych gave you a bad risk rating because you didn’t have a
RPP, be sure to argue that the risk rating should be lowered if you later develop one.
b. Do your best to obtain an AA/NA sponsor. Along with a transitional home, he
or she will be the primary focus of your RPP.
c. If you plan to attend AA/NA upon release, obtain and bring with you a list and
schedule of meetings in the area where you plan to parole.
If you have an active ICE hold you will likely be deported upon release. So you must
have viable parole plans for the country to which you will be deported. And the Board
CANNOT require that you have parole plans in California.
If you are disabled, elderly, and unable to work, if you can show you have income from
Social Security, Disability, Medicare, Medi-cal, a pension from the VA or old job, an
inheritance, or your support network will cover your living expenses, by law you have
adequate parole plans. But be sure to provide adequate proof of this income (with the
caveat that you might not want to reveal a large sum of money if the Victim or Next of
Kin might try to sue you for it after you parole. Discuss this with your lawyer).
C. PAROLE HEARING AND PREPARATION DOS AND DONTS.
1. ALWAYS DO YOUR OLSEN REVIEW. Ensure your C-file contains
everything it should and nothing it shouldn’t.
- if you have a GED, High School, or College Diploma, make sure it’s in there;
make sure all your laudatory chronos, certificates, work reports are in there.
- make sure the disciplinary record is complete and accurate. If you were given
a 115 and had it dismissed, make sure it has been removed from your C-file.
Documents often don't make it into your C-file. Documents that should be deleted
from your C-file often aren't. The Board accepts everything in your C-file as true, and
assumes that anything not in your C-file does not exist. These are ridiculous assumptions,
but it’s not something you should normally ever have to deal with if you follow through
with your responsibility to make sure your C-file is up-to-date and accurate.
2. ALWAYS attend your PSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATION and cooperate
fully with the doctor (except as discussed earlier).
3. DO NOT cite law to the Board. That is your attorney’s job. If you do they may
think you’ve spent more time learning law than programming and hold that against you.
4. DO NOT argue with the Board or D.A. or challenge statements they make that is your attorney’s job. Make sure he or she does.
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Old 01-21-2016, 02:38 PM
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Thank you, PJ!

I have a quick question maybe someone can answer:

4.8.f. You will likely have problems obtaining permission to parole out of state before being given a parole date. As a result, you should obtain a residence in California where you can live until your out-of-state transfer request is processed.

My home is in Arizona and I own it. How heavily is home stability weighed into this decision and if they are denied out-of-state parole is there a chance to have that transferred at some point after release?

He doesn't have a history of substance abuse so I hadn't considered a halfway house. He does have family in CA that would house him if permitted, but they also carry felony convictions.
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Old 01-21-2016, 02:43 PM
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I can tell you from what I've learned they will prefer that you have transitional housing as a plan before going home. They take the re-entry process very seriously. I'm thinking while he is in transitional housing you can be putting the out of state approval in process. Stability is key and if your environment, home you as a person can provide that then getting approved should be a smooth process. Going back to the county that he originally committed the crime is always like a red flag and therefore if he can parole to a different county even a different state to start fresh is always good.
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Old 01-21-2016, 03:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pj663 View Post
I can tell you from what I've learned they will prefer that you have transitional housing as a plan before going home. They take the re-entry process very seriously. I'm thinking while he is in transitional housing you can be putting the out of state approval in process. Stability is key and if your environment, home you as a person can provide that then getting approved should be a smooth process. Going back to the county that he originally committed the crime is always like a red flag and therefore if he can parole to a different county even a different state to start fresh is always good.
We'll look into CA transitional housing options for him and have both outlined. As a former gang member I can't fathom them requiring him to go back to that county let alone family housing with active members moving in and out. Thank you!
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Old 01-22-2016, 12:23 PM
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These are some good no I meant great guidelines to follow for the parole process. But my question is this is it only for the lifers? Or does it also include guys/ladies that have a date to come home. I want to know so I can start my part in looking up things for my husband. Whom has a parole hearing in the next 3 years. And time flies quick don't want to be off guard with what should have been done or said.
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Old 04-30-2016, 11:52 PM
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Has anyone experienced your loved one feeling unmotivated to try and do anything required to get a possible parole date under the SB260? I feel that my loved one has little motivation because he is stuck in his comfort zone, appears not to go out of his cell much, accepted his fate as a lifer, possibly afraid. I can't name it! I know he is remorseful over his crime, I know he himself feels he is a changed person from the 17 year old kid he was 15 years ago. I feel he is constantly working on himself, improving him self independently. He feels very frustrated as a lifer on level 4, there is very little available for him. He has not been able to enroll in school, can't get a job, nothing available as far as self help groups. It could be the prison he is at. So I'm struggling in finding a way to motivate him, keep asking questions, not allowing defeat to deflate his interest. How can I motivate him? Any ideas?
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Old 07-17-2017, 06:48 PM
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Can someone clarify if parole hearings for inmates falling under 260/261 YOP are listed on the main parole hearing schedule? I see that some say "YOP Gap" but I'm not sure what that means. Is there a separate calendar for YOP hearings?
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