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  #1  
Old 06-20-2014, 10:42 PM
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foreverandever foreverandever is offline
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Default Is there a place my hubby can sell his artwork where they dont take a %?

hello can anyone help me is there site or someplace my husband can sell his artwork were they dont take a percentage. or at least not alot. like ebay if can help i would so appreciate if someone can point me in the right direction. thank you so much.
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Old 06-21-2014, 06:20 AM
CenTexLyn CenTexLyn is offline
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I'm not understanding where the issue is. After all, ebay has fees. Galleries take commissions. This isn't a prison thing- it is simply what artists go through to sell their artwork. It is how galleries make their money. The ONLY way I know of to avoid fees is to open his OWN gallery, but then he also absorbs the obligations for overhead to include utilities and taxes and other expenses.
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Old 06-21-2014, 06:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CenTexLyn View Post
I'm not understanding where the issue is. After all, ebay has fees. Galleries take commissions. This isn't a prison thing- it is simply what artists go through to sell their artwork. It is how galleries make their money. The ONLY way I know of to avoid fees is to open his OWN gallery, but then he also absorbs the obligations for overhead to include utilities and taxes and other expenses.
Are you respomdimg tp my thread
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Old 06-21-2014, 07:08 AM
littleun littleun is offline
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You could try Etsy.com I've never sold anything on there, but I know a few people that do. I think they charge 3.5% fees, which is just on the price of the item, not on the shipping costs etc...
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Old 06-21-2014, 03:19 PM
CenTexLyn CenTexLyn is offline
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Are you respomdimg tp my thread
yes. The answer rests within the comments...the original post comes across as wanting something other than artists in the free-world have to contend with. Commissions and fees are part of an artist selling their stuff without having their own gallery (which is ALSO not without significant costs).
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Old 06-22-2014, 02:24 AM
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Oh, and there's BigCartel that sells artists products. I think there they have monthly plans rather than fees per item. I think they have a free plan where you can have 5 items and 1 image per item, then the lowest paid fee is $9.99/month for 25 items, 3 images/item... They have a pretty easy to use interface, but I'm not sure if I'm allowed to post links...
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Old 07-13-2016, 06:23 AM
Cicero Johnson Cicero Johnson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverandever View Post
hello can anyone help me is there site or someplace my husband can sell his artwork were they dont take a percentage. or at least not alot. like ebay if can help i would so appreciate if someone can point me in the right direction. thank you so much.

Drawings? Paintings? Books on his artwork? Beadwork?

Bear in mind that at one end of the spectrum you have the places that charge a high percentage, and at the other end you can set up your own website on GoDaddy and pay about $6.00 a month to run the site. The problem is that the more expensive places are charging a commission as it covers their expense of maintaining and advertising the site. i.e. they bring customers to you.

You shouldn't look at the percentage taken out--you should look at the volume of happy sellers since that is an indicator of how well they do for the artist.
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Old 07-13-2016, 08:59 AM
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The problem with GoDaddy for registration of domain, Altervista (not altavista, altervista, the Italian free website place), and finding decent free/low cost web software for your portfolio is that this does not generate traffic. Even if you know what you're doing and meta tag everything correctly, make your portfolio look like something unique in comparison to all college and MFA portfolios out there - you're still not going to generate traffic. You have to spend a ton of money to generate name recognition and traffic. Berkeley Brethed can do it. Somebody without a name in any aspect of the art world cannot. So, if you're paying $6 a month, making no sales, you're still owing $6 an hour. It takes thousands if not tens of thousands (depending on the type of art your LO does) to get even a tiny bit of name recognition.

So, if you want to make money on art, you do what all artists, writers, actors, and musicians do - you find an agent. An agent takes a percentage of all sales - helps motivate the agent. Get into a physical gallery, the gallery owner is also going to take a cut of all sales - helps keep the gallery running, and keeps the gallery owner looking for the best it can for its market as the reputation (and the utilities and rent) of the gallery depends on what (and how) it hangs stuff on its walls. If you're really good, you'll get solo shows at the best galleries without any effort. But then the free advertising comes in the form of art critics. Good reviews, you're getting a ton of buyers in. Bad reviews, and your show may close very quickly.

You can go etsy, deviantart, eBay, whatever - still gonna cost you a percentage. Still going to be difficult for buyers to find you, even if you're properly classified according to your particular style of art. Fwiw, if you can't name at least 3 other artists who've contributed to your style, you're probably not able to appropriately classify your style. Harsh, I know, but plenty of people draw, do a bit of watercolor, that sort of thing. Want to find buyers who actually want your stuff because you're the next Jackson Pollack or Otto Dix? Be able to properly classify yourself.

The other big issue is being able to find the appropriate price point. That's where agents and galleries come in. They are usually spot on with who you are, where you are in your career, and the value of your art in comparison to others and the market. Most serious artists, even the likes of Andy Kubert, have a hard time with properly pricing their work (and Kubert works with the likes of Neil Gaimon, go figure). New artists usually either extremely overvalue their work or extremely undervalue their work.

Now, as to the "prison" aspect of this whole thing. Unless you're an infamous prison artists like John Wayne Gacy, and you're wanting to market your art not to people who actually enjoy art, but to people interested in the macabre, you're SOL unless your LO was convicted of an infamous crime, nationally or internationally infamous. Prison alone lacks any sort of cache. I've represented enough artists to know this. Most people lose the prison aspect of their bio as soon as they can get some more legitimate credentials. The era of outsider art is long past, with very few noted exceptions that currently elude me.

Fwiw, I spent some time out in CA at my uncle's gallery. He'd put a call out to the "community", i.e. photography artists (his major niche) and their agents (one agent could handle 20 or more artists) in Southern CA, for a specific theme for an upcoming show. Artists or agents would send him samples of their work. My job was to do "fist pass" reviews, writing "thank you, but..." letters to those who didn't make it past my desk, and "under further consideration" letters for those who made it past my desk (this was in the Mac SE era - no real internet to speak of, so my info is dated). Mark would then do his first pass, and I'd argue for the ones I really liked. Anything that didn't make it past his first pass got one of my "thank you, but..." letters, anything that did got an "under further consideration" letter. Since he would do shows with no more than 4 artists, he'd take the pile of 20-30 remaining submissions and start playing with them - how they'd look together to meet the ideal of his theme. Nothing could be too stylistically too similar. He wasn't big into mixed media on the photo paper (again, this was before digital, he's since become something of a digital and mixed media junkie) though we did add audio on occasion, and the overall theme had to be met to his standards. I'd write the "thank you but...." letters, he'd write the "we are interested, let's talk terms" letters though terms were fairly standard for all who were represented by agents. Most not represented who'd done more than a year on their own were just happy to be shown in a gallery. Those who were straight from school who'd had shows every year in undergrad or their MFA program had overinflated ideas of what they should be getting.

Anyway, he was regularly reviewed positively by LA critics even though his gallery was South of LA by an hour. Good reviews by critics meant that the pieces sold, and sold well (with the exception of shows meant to startle and disturb - they were reviewed well, but no doctor or lawyer wanted those pieces in their waiting room, and no family wanted those pieces in their living room. Some wanted them for the purposes of collection, but those were the exceptions).

This was the process for a small gallery dealing in high art photography with a liberal leaning social message.

Oh, and my uncle supplemented his income (and his artist base) by teaching at two different colleges, so if you think that a college art education is a waste of time, think again - it's an entree into the field. Of course, if you aren't high art, you might want to think about a different venue where similar artists meet/educate each other.

The internet has flooded the market with art and "art" making it difficult for buyers to find what they are looking for. Agents still have a vital function as they represent a bulk of artists who meet their standards. If an agent is all over the board - food art to anime, you've got the wrong agent. Galleries still have the cache of their name and most true buyers start there (true buyers - people willing to spend 4 figures or higher for a piece of art).

Anyway, more than you wanted to know, but here for your consideration.

I am not an artist. I am not an IP attorney. I am not an agent. I have no interest in this area other than I like my art and am particular about what I hang on my walls. My uncle approves of some of this. He disproves of other stuff.
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Old 07-13-2016, 09:50 AM
Cicero Johnson Cicero Johnson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yourself View Post
The problem with GoDaddy for registration of domain...
Well said. I'd rather they take 50% of my price and sell an item for $100 than they take 1% of my fee and sell it for $50.00. (Or, more realistically, $20.)

In addition, there is a dynamic that takes place with BOTH of those sales prices. If I sell it at $100.00, I have now set the "value" of my work at $100.00. If I sell it for $50.00, I have set the value there.

When I go to sell again, those prior prices matter, especially if I have taken the steps to make sure I have the buyers name, and am selling to them directly.

Always aim for the top of the market, not the bottom. In fact, when you are starting out, it is not a bad idea to make fewer sales of higher quality. Indeed, giving away artwork strategically is a time honored way of setting perceived value.
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Last edited by Cicero Johnson; 07-13-2016 at 09:54 AM..
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