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Old 10-27-2003, 12:41 AM
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Thumbs up "California Prison Slang"- Translated

Ace-Duce: Best friend.

Ad Seg: Administrative Segregation. Placement in a controlled unit for the safety and security of the institution --

Ain't Right: A situation, person, or object of dubious correctness

All Day: A life sentence, as in "He's doin' all day . . ."

All Day and a Night: Life without parole.

AW: Associate Warden.

Badge: A correctional officer.

Bean Chute: Slot through which food trays are inserted. Also, slot through which ad seg prisoners are cuffed prior to leaving cell.

Beef: A disciplinary charge, as to "catch a beef."

Big House: Prison.

Birds on the Line: Warning that someone is listening to a conversation.

Blade: A prison made weapon, a shank.

Blues: Prison clothes.

Boat: To transfer out of a prison, as in "on a boat."

Boneyard: Family (conjugal) visiting area.

Books: Trust fund account, "on the books." All money received by a prisoner is placed into a trust account and may be withdrawn for canteen purchases, special orders, postage, and other expenses.

Box: A quarterly package containing personal items sent from the outside.

Brass: High ranking administration.

Brew: Homemade alcohol; "pruno."

Bricks: The outside, on the outside, as in "on the bricks."

Broadway: The first floor of some tiers. A wide area where prisoners come and go -- and occasionally may be housed if the prison is particularly crowded.

Bug: A crazy person.

Bumpin Gums: Talking Excessively.

C-file: The central file. The critical information maintained on each prisoner.

Call: Time for specified events -- e.g., mail call or sick call. May be known in some jurisdictions as a call out.

Camp: CDC minimum security facilities for firefighting and conservation work.

Case: Disciplinary violation, as in "to catch a case."

Catch a Square: To get ready to fight, as "You'd better catch a square, punk." Derives from the corners in a boxing ring.

Cat Walk: Walkway above yard or tier where officers patrol. Officers in the area, as in "cat walk front to back."

Cellie: Cellmate.

Check Off: Someone who asks for protective custody.

Chin Check: To hit someone in the jaw to see if he will stand up for himself.

Chrono: Informational notes by prison officials documenting classification decisions, minor disciplinary offenses, medical orders, and just about everything else that might be recorded on a prisoner. (CA)

Click Up: To join a gang.

C.O.: Correctional Officer.

Convict: A prisoner with traditional values. One who has pride and respect, who maintains integrity, who is not an informant, whose word is good. A convict is different from an inmate.

Count: The institutional count, repeated at different times in the day. Everything stops while prison staff make sure no one is missing.

Crimey: Best friend or co=defendant.

Debrief: Prisoners who wish to establish that they are no longer associated with a prison gang must provide information regarding gang activities and pass a polygraph examination. The prisoner must give names and identify criminal activity. This is the only means available to a prisoner to establish that they have left a prison gang and should be released from segregation. Having become an informant, the prisoner must rely on the Department of Corrections to protect them. It is an extremely dangerous pact. Prisoners who are wrongfully identified as gang associates may have nothing to offer in the debriefing process.

Dope Fiend Move: A sleazy maneuver.

Double Cell: Housing two prisoners in a cell designed for one.

Down: Locked up, as in "This your first time down?"

Draw: Canteen order.

Drive Up: New officer or prisoner. Can be used as in "just drove up."

Ear Hustling: Listening to conversations going on over the tier (eavesdropping).

E.P.R.D.: Earliest Possible Release Date. A prisoner's release date, assuming that he or she earns credits and stays out of trouble. Computing this date can be difficult since it is based on a complex formula. The prison's computation can be reviewed through the Legal Status Summary Sheet.

Fence Parole: Escape.

Fish: A new prisoner.

Fish Row: Cells where new prisoners are placed.

Fish Line: A line used to pull items from one cell to another. A "fishing pole" refers to an item used to facilitate this line, such as a rolled up newspaper.

Fishing Kit: A small packet of toiletries, such as deodorant, toothpaste, soap, and a toothbrush that are issued to new prisoners

Food Strike: A group of prisoners that refuse to go to the dining hall to take food, or go there and refuse to eat anything. Unlike a Hunger Strike, prisoners still eat food that was bought or made by them in the units.


Gang Jacket: Validated as being a gang member.

Gate: Release, as in "30 days to the gate."

Gate Money: The small amount of money given a prisoner upon release.

General Population: The mainline. Prisoners who can mix with other prisoners.

Good Time: Credits earned toward one's sentence.

G.P.: General population.

Hard Time: Serving a sentence the difficult way.

Hole: Solitary confinement, segregation, disciplinary detention cells.

Homeboy: Another prisoner from one's hometown or neighborhood.

Homes: One's cell. Prisoners returning to the cell may be "going home."

Hootch: Homemade (or cellmade) alcohol

Hook-up: To obtain someone's address and phone number.

House: Cell.

Ink: Tattoos.

Ink Slinger: A prisoner who draws tattoos (slinging ink)

Inmate: Just another prisoner.

Inmate Fund: An account where all the prisoners "official" money is stored and ussed to by commisary items. The Inmate Welfare Fund (IWF) is the trust account that is to be used for the benefit of all prisoners (such as renting movies, bying new recreational equipment), and is generally funded through surcharges applied to various purchases and activities.

Inside: Behind the walls.

In The Car: To be in a tight circle of friends.

IWF: Inmate Welfare Fund.

Jacket: Central File. Label.

Jail: A county facility for pretrial detainees or prisoners serving short terms (less than a year). Distinct from prison.

Jam Up: Ask a prisoner about something.

Joint: Prison.

Jolt: A long sentence.

Juice Card: Privileges afforded a prisoner based on an officer's favor. As in, "He's on the phone again, must have a juice card."

Kicking It: Hanging out with a friend.

Kite: Notes or letters. Any message passed to a prisoner.
To "shoot a kite" is to send a message.

Lifer: A prisoner serving a life sentence.

Lockdown: The policy of confining a group of prisoners or an entire prison to cells. This is generally done in response to unrest or emergency -- although some lockdowns are instituted for extended periods of time.

Lop: A prisoner held in low regard or considered stupid. A fool, chump or sucker.

L.W.O.P.: Life Without Possibility of Parole.

Main Line: The general population.

Make Paper: Make parole

Man: An officer "The Man."

Man Walking: A signal that an officer is coming down the tier.

Max Out: To serve one's full sentence.

Missive: Many prisoners commonly use this word to refer to correspondence.

Mud: Coffee.

Mule: Individual who transports contraband to a prisoner.

New Boot: A new correctional officer.

New Jack: New officer or prisoner.

Nut up: Go crazy.

Off the Hook: Crazy, wierd, odd. "He's off the hook", "This place is off the hook".

Old School: An old timer. One who has the values of a "convict" when prisoners paid more respect to each other.

Old-Timer: A convict who has served a lot of time inside. A member of the Old School. An "O.G" (old guy)

On the Gate: Open the door.

Paid: A favorable out come of a parole or classification hearing.

Paper: Proof that a prisoner is an informant or "rat." As in "We've got the paper on him."

PC: Protective custody. Prisoners may be placed in protective custody for a number of reasons --

Pelicanizing: The process of implementing further restrictions at mainline prisons, resembling segregation units. Refers to the "super-maximum" prison at Pelican Bay.

Phone: In the SHU, the toilet may be bailed out and used to talk to other prisoners. As in "Hey Joe get on the phone."

Points: Prisoners in California are classified by security level according to the number of points awarded various factors on a score sheet.

Priors: Previous prison terms, enhancing one's sentence or affecting the classification score

Pruno: Homemade alcohol, fermented juice, the classic prison drink.

Rabbit: a prisoner who is likely to try and escape, someone who "has rabbit in him."

Rack: Bunk.

Rat: An informant. See "Snitch."

Retired: A lifer.

Road dogs: Prisoners who walk the track on the exercise yard together. A person who has remained a best friend through thick and thin whether on the inside or on the outside.

Schooled: Taught in the ways of prison life.

Shakedown: A search of a cell, work area, or person.

Shank: Handmade prison weapon -- generally a stabbing instrument.

Short: To be near the end of a sentence.

Shot Caller: A person on the yards who directs action/discipline.

Shot out : Useless, worn out.

SHU: Security Housing Unit. Segregation, the Hole. Prisoners may be placed in the SHU for limited disciplinary terms or on an indeterminate basis for posing a general threat to prison security. The most notorious SHU unit in California is at the "super-maximum" Pelican Bay and is characterized by isolation, sensory deprivation, limited access to programs, and the use of force. Pronounced “shoe”

Skating: Being in an area of the prison you are not allowed, especially another housing unit. Being "out of place".

Snitch: An informant. Rat. One who has given up names or activities.

Speeding Ticket: A rules violation notice for inappropriate behavior in the visiting room, such as kissing or touching.

Spun Out: Crazy, stupid, idiotic.

SSU: Special Services Unit, the security (or "goon") squad.

State Issue: Food, prison clothing, and other items given or mandated by the state.

Straight: "That's straight, " or "I'm happy with that."

Street: The outside world, as in "on the street."

Tat: tattoo.

Traffic Ticket: Minor disciplinary offense.

Trailer: A conjugal visit, as in a "trailer visit."

Tune Up: A severe beating by an officer.

Turnkey: A guard who is there just to open doors, who cares about nothing other than doing his or her shift.

The Walk: The walkway in a prison which leads from one place to another. Most walks contain yellow lines on both sides. Inmates are required to walk on one side of the lines.

Wire: A message, or info that comes over the phone, as in "I got a wire today about..."

Working the Corners: Building a relationship in prison to provide news, information, or protection. Being "plugged" into the prison undercurrents.

Work time Credits: Half -time (one day for two) earned after California prisoners are assigned to a job.

Wreck: When a prisoner gets into trouble, as in "Did you hear about Jones? He got into a wreck last night on East yard."

Write Up: Disciplinary report.

Yard: The exercise area. In segregation, the yard may be nothing more than a concrete "dog run" with no equipment. Other units may have a basketball court, recreation equipment, or grassy areas.

-NUMBERS-

4 piece A full set of restraints (cuffs, leg irons, waist, and security cover).

12:01: Used when a prisoner is discharged. "I got a 12:01 tonight."

12/12: To serve the entire sentence without parole. The end of a penal term.

115: A rules violation report (CDC Form 115) can lead to disciplinary action. It may be classified as either "administrative" or "serious."

602: The prisoner grievance or administrative appeal process (CDC Form 602). This process provides three formal levels of review, beginning institutional levels and progressing to the Director's review in Sacramento. Although the appeals process provides a means to express complaints, there are many problems with the system and appeals are frequently "lost" at the informal levels of review.
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We the People of the United States of America who reside in the Great State of California declare Justice for All California Prisoners; To Insure Freedom from Harm, Demand Security and Protection, Promote Health and Wellness, and Inspire Wisdom and Knowledge for the men and women who are held captive behind the walls of the California Department Of Correction's prisons. We, the Men, the Women, and the Children, who suffer and anguish with our loved-ones behind bars,hold CDC accountable and responsible for every action, every deed, every motive and every decision they make towards and against The Incarcerated.

The Friends and Families of California’s Prisoners

Last edited by MsClever; 10-27-2003 at 12:47 AM..
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Old 10-27-2003, 09:27 AM
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Those are great, Linnie!
I always joke with my husband about "program", meaning how an inmate decides to spend or do his time...example...they will often say "That's not in my program". So whenever my husband asks me to do something not in our usual ways, I'll say, "sorry babe, that's not in my program". LOL

Wendy
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Old 10-27-2003, 09:49 AM
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Shoot ! .. LOL -the word "Program" I forgot it Wendy and I love the way you use it in your family-I will definately remember that for future use..let me practice.."Sorry babe, that's not in my program" LOL ! How did I do ??

Also left off :

Slammed: another word for Locked Down!
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We the People of the United States of America who reside in the Great State of California declare Justice for All California Prisoners; To Insure Freedom from Harm, Demand Security and Protection, Promote Health and Wellness, and Inspire Wisdom and Knowledge for the men and women who are held captive behind the walls of the California Department Of Correction's prisons. We, the Men, the Women, and the Children, who suffer and anguish with our loved-ones behind bars,hold CDC accountable and responsible for every action, every deed, every motive and every decision they make towards and against The Incarcerated.

The Friends and Families of California’s Prisoners
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Old 10-27-2003, 10:47 AM
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MY FAVORITE is HATE MAIL!

Do you have a slang translation for that MsClever??

LMAO
Love
Kathy
PS
SLANG: DROFAOTD

TRANSLATION: "DUKE ROLLING ON THE FLOOR AND OUT THE DOOR

VISUAL:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg hatemail.jpg (16.8 KB, 130 views)
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Old 10-27-2003, 10:59 AM
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LOL KATHY...

Ummm No Translation, but that was a good visual... Thats an Original-Should I copy write it ?? hehehe =0)

Your GoofBall - Love It !
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We the People of the United States of America who reside in the Great State of California declare Justice for All California Prisoners; To Insure Freedom from Harm, Demand Security and Protection, Promote Health and Wellness, and Inspire Wisdom and Knowledge for the men and women who are held captive behind the walls of the California Department Of Correction's prisons. We, the Men, the Women, and the Children, who suffer and anguish with our loved-ones behind bars,hold CDC accountable and responsible for every action, every deed, every motive and every decision they make towards and against The Incarcerated.

The Friends and Families of California’s Prisoners
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Old 10-27-2003, 03:52 PM
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HEY---LINNIE---DID YA COPY AND PASTE OR DID YOU SPEND FOREVER TYPING ALL THIS IN?!? LMAO... YOU ARE TOO FUNNY!!!

HAPPY DAY!!!
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Old 10-27-2003, 04:57 PM
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(HAND RAISED)

ME ME ME! I CAN ANSWER THAT ONE!

LOL
Kathy
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Old 10-27-2003, 06:11 PM
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I copied and pasted, and deleted the less than appropriate terms.. until my fingers fell off..LOL

I think this should be a Sticky !! =0)

Its useful information-think about it?? How many times have we said, "what the heck does that mean"-when talking to our loved ones...LOL
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We the People of the United States of America who reside in the Great State of California declare Justice for All California Prisoners; To Insure Freedom from Harm, Demand Security and Protection, Promote Health and Wellness, and Inspire Wisdom and Knowledge for the men and women who are held captive behind the walls of the California Department Of Correction's prisons. We, the Men, the Women, and the Children, who suffer and anguish with our loved-ones behind bars,hold CDC accountable and responsible for every action, every deed, every motive and every decision they make towards and against The Incarcerated.

The Friends and Families of California’s Prisoners
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Old 03-06-2019, 03:00 AM
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I am bringing this thread back!! haha

Beeeecause I’m curious.
Is this kind of slang still used today? Or has it changed/new words come about over the years?

For example, I’ve seen but not on this thread that 12:01 means “a prisoner has been discharged”

Is that true, and if so, is it still used today?

...etc
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Old 03-06-2019, 07:07 AM
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Id not heard that one. (12:01) or actually many of the numbers ones. (except 115)



But it made me think of Catch Chain....which when an inmate goes from county to prison...,.(pretty sure it is)
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Old 03-06-2019, 10:39 AM
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As a CO I recognize Most of the slang. Of course much of it is used between inmates and not inmate to staff. So It's stuff I have never heard. Some of it we just use different slang words.

But yes, Staff use some of the slang when talking to inmates.
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Old 03-06-2019, 12:51 PM
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I'd say 50/50 on what's still being used. It's funny, when I was new to this, and PTO, I asked about explaining some terms to my parents before the met him (like program, cellie, ect). I got jumped six ways from Sunday because "any man who would use that language with you isn't respectful". What else do they call programming?! Is there another word? To me this isn't slang, it is what it is. A cellie is a cellie, even though I realize it's short for cellmate. Does that make is slang or disrespectful to use with non-prison folks?

The one I still don't get because I feel like it is a hangover from a time I can't appreciate-- convict vs. inmate. Again, not slang, but when we say convict = A prisoner with traditional values. One who has pride and respect, who maintains integrity, who is not an informant, whose word is good. A convict is different from an inmate.

As a former gang member, the definition for convict is essentially the same as homey. That works against all the rehabilitation values my husband and I hold. He calls himself an inmate because for the last 17 years, that's been his status where he lived. He is proud, but not prideful, he has respect for himself but isn't arrogant, he follows through on his word but ensures that his word is based on a moral code that is first grounded in doing the right thing.

I know some still hold the "convict" title with pride. I'm guess I'm glad mine doesn't.
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Old 03-07-2019, 09:23 AM
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Mine didnt care. (inmate vs convict)

Another one I remember is......
If someone is IN YOUR CAR.....I believe can mean someone who basically has your back, is in your *group* (hub says it could also mean a gang but not necessarily.)
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Old 03-07-2019, 06:43 PM
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One I find a little weird is hearing my son say something like "I'm going back to my house". Thinking of the closets they live in as their house is their reality. I think about that whenever I see a photo of inside of a prison. 3 floors and rows of cell doors. That's "their house".
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Old 03-07-2019, 08:33 PM
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A cup of coffee it is called a "fix" a cup of coffee with sugar and cream A Cadillac. We referred to condemned row as the "shelf"
five -o meant the CO is coming either up the stairwell or on the tier . Keeping point. keep an eye out for the CO.
I would have to think some more to think of the slang I have used inside.
12:01 is more of a county term they kick you out after midnight.
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Old 03-07-2019, 10:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrickj;7767311[SIZE=4
][/size] a cup of coffee with sugar and cream A Cadillac.
Now this one I hear a lot.
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Old 03-08-2019, 07:36 AM
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Im having one right now.....
(a cadillac)
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Old 03-08-2019, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by sidewalker View Post
Im having one right now.....
(a cadillac)
I'm a black coffee person, I think that's a shot? Or is that only if you take it down while it's really hot. I'm a sipper. Til it's cold and the cup is empty.
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Old 03-09-2019, 05:00 AM
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I hate the coffee I want to be hot and if it cools off, Ive been dumping it
Until fairly recently I got a contigo cup and it keeps it much much warmer than a regular old cup


Yet I will drink ice coffee......lol. How logical is THAT?
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