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Loving a Violent Offender Discuss the issues of having a violent offender as part of your life. Please keep in mind that some of us are married to violent offenders. Please remember that these offenders are human, and as such, can change... just like anyone else.

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  #1  
Old 02-03-2006, 01:39 PM
Jillian Jillian is offline
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Default What are considered Violent Crimes?

CRIME TYPOLOGIES

VIOLENT CRIMES



Forcible rape – defined in common law as “the carnal knowledge of a female forcibly and against her will.”

Population density influences the rape rate. Metropolitan areas today have rape rates significantly higher than rural areas

Rape is a warm-weather crime with most incidents occurring during July and August and the lowest rates occurring during December, January, and February.

Rape is frequently underreported

Fail to report rapes because they are embarrassed, believe nothing can be done, or blame themselves.

There are two broad categories of rape: stranger-to-stranger rape and acquaintance rape, which includes the subcategories of date rape and marital rape.

Stranger rapes are typically more violent than acquaintance rapes; attackers are more likely to carry a weapon, threaten the victim, and harem her physically.

Stranger rape is over-represented in official statistics because victims who are more viciously harmed are the most likely to contact police.

Statutory rape – sexual relations between an underage minor female and an adult male. Although the sex is not forced or coerced, the law says that young girls are incapable of giving informed consent, so the act is legally considered non-consensual.

Shield laws – protect women from being questioned about their sexual history unless it directly bears on the case



Murder and Homicide – defined in common law as “the unlawful killing of a human being with malice aforethought.

There is no statute of limitations on murder.

First –degree murder occurs when a person kills another after premeditation and deliberation.

Premeditation – killing was considered beforehand and suggests that it was motivated by more than a simple desire to engage in an act of violence.

Deliberation – the killing was planned, after careful thought, rather than carried out on impulse.

Felony murder – a killing accompanying a felony usually constitutes first-degree murder

Second-degree murder – requires the killer to have malice aforethought, but not premeditation or deliberation. It occurs when a person’s wanton disregard for the victim’s life and his or her desire to inflict serious bodily harm on the victim results in the victim’s death.
Manslaughter – homicide without malice and is usually punishable by anywhere between 1 and 15 years in prison.

Voluntary or non-negligent manslaughter- killing in the heat of passion or during a sudden quarrel that provoked violence.

Involuntary or negligent manslaughter – killing that occurs when a person’s acts are negligent and without regard for the harm they may cause others.

Murder victims tend to be males, over 18 years of age.

There is a disturbing trend for African Americans to both commit murder and become murder victims.

Murder tends to be intra-racial

Murder can be separated into those involving strangers, typically stemming from a felony attempt, and acquaintance homicides involving disputes between family, friends, and acquaintances.

Most females who kill their mates do so after suffering repeated violent attacks.



Assault and Battery – refers to two separate crimes. Battery requires offensive touching, such as slapping, hitting, or punching a victim. Assault requires no actual touching but involves either attempted battery or unintentionally frightening the victim by word or deed.

Although common law intended these twin crimes to be misdemeanors, most jurisdictions now upgrade them to felonies either when a weapon is used or when they occur during the commission of a felony.

Serious assault or aggravated assault is defined in the UCR as “an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury.” This definition is similar to the one used in most state jurisdictions.

An assault and battery occurs if the victim suffers a temporarily painful blow, even if no injury results. Battery can also involve offensive touching, such as if a man kisses a woman against her will or puts his hands on her body.

People arrested for assault and those identified by victims are usually young, male, and white, although the number of African Americans arrested for assault is disproportionate to their representation in the population.

Assault victims tend to be male, but women also face a significant danger.

Assault rates are highest in urban areas, during summer, and in southern and western regions.

The most common weapons used in assaults are blunt instruments, hands and feet, firearms, and knives.



Robbery – the common law definition, and the one used by the FBI, is “the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.”

Robbery is considered a violent crime because it involves the use of force to obtain money or goods.

Robbery is punished severely because the victim’s life is put in jeopardy. The severity of the punishment is based on the amount of force used during the crime, not the value of the items taken.

Northeastern states have by far the highest robbery rate.

Robbery offenders are disproportionately young, male, minority group members.

Most robberies are stranger-to-stranger robberies.

Street robberies are the most common type, especially in urban areas

The typical armed robber is unlikely to be a professional who carefully studies targets while planning a crime. Instead, the typical robber does not plan crimes, or plans them randomly.


Hate Crimes – or bias crimes are violent acts directed toward a particular person or members of a group merely because the targets share a discernible racial, ethnic, religious, or gender characteristic.

Hate crimes are often unplanned

Usually involve convenient, vulnerable targets who are incapable of fighting back.

http://personal.uncc.edu/mfmckenz/So...Typologies.htm
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Old 02-03-2006, 01:42 PM
Jillian Jillian is offline
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I found this on the internet and i thought it would be interesting for us to know .. i do understand that we know what our love one is in for but here is a list of all the things that are fall into this category..

For the longest i have always wondered why when you type in to search violent offenders i always get that plus sexual offenders combined but now as i see the top of the list .. I see why .. no it is not that i thought a sexual offence wasnt violated i always felt that they were in some what of a different category. (if that makes any sense) i hope this helps anyone who has wondered all what were considered a violent offense
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Old 02-03-2006, 01:52 PM
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I'm working on putting together a state by state list of this, according to the FBI, there are only a few violent crimes, they are criminal homicide (murder and nonegligent manslaughter); robbery; aggravated assault; and forcible rape. And this is according to their crime index. Of course, it differs from state to state.
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Old 02-04-2006, 01:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by e_wife03
CRIME TYPOLOGIES

VIOLENT CRIMES



Forcible rape – defined in common law as “the carnal knowledge of a female forcibly and against her will.”

Population density influences the rape rate. Metropolitan areas today have rape rates significantly higher than rural areas

Rape is a warm-weather crime with most incidents occurring during July and August and the lowest rates occurring during December, January, and February.

Rape is frequently underreported

Fail to report rapes because they are embarrassed, believe nothing can be done, or blame themselves.

There are two broad categories of rape: stranger-to-stranger rape and acquaintance rape, which includes the subcategories of date rape and marital rape.

Stranger rapes are typically more violent than acquaintance rapes; attackers are more likely to carry a weapon, threaten the victim, and harem her physically.

Stranger rape is over-represented in official statistics because victims who are more viciously harmed are the most likely to contact police.

Statutory rape – sexual relations between an underage minor female and an adult male. Although the sex is not forced or coerced, the law says that young girls are incapable of giving informed consent, so the act is legally considered non-consensual.

Shield laws – protect women from being questioned about their sexual history unless it directly bears on the case



Murder and Homicide – defined in common law as “the unlawful killing of a human being with malice aforethought.

There is no statute of limitations on murder.

First –degree murder occurs when a person kills another after premeditation and deliberation.

Premeditation – killing was considered beforehand and suggests that it was motivated by more than a simple desire to engage in an act of violence.

Deliberation – the killing was planned, after careful thought, rather than carried out on impulse.

Felony murder – a killing accompanying a felony usually constitutes first-degree murder

Second-degree murder – requires the killer to have malice aforethought, but not premeditation or deliberation. It occurs when a person’s wanton disregard for the victim’s life and his or her desire to inflict serious bodily harm on the victim results in the victim’s death.
Manslaughter – homicide without malice and is usually punishable by anywhere between 1 and 15 years in prison.

Voluntary or non-negligent manslaughter- killing in the heat of passion or during a sudden quarrel that provoked violence.

Involuntary or negligent manslaughter – killing that occurs when a person’s acts are negligent and without regard for the harm they may cause others.

Murder victims tend to be males, over 18 years of age.

There is a disturbing trend for African Americans to both commit murder and become murder victims.

Murder tends to be intra-racial

Murder can be separated into those involving strangers, typically stemming from a felony attempt, and acquaintance homicides involving disputes between family, friends, and acquaintances.

Most females who kill their mates do so after suffering repeated violent attacks.



Assault and Battery – refers to two separate crimes. Battery requires offensive touching, such as slapping, hitting, or punching a victim. Assault requires no actual touching but involves either attempted battery or unintentionally frightening the victim by word or deed.

Although common law intended these twin crimes to be misdemeanors, most jurisdictions now upgrade them to felonies either when a weapon is used or when they occur during the commission of a felony.

Serious assault or aggravated assault is defined in the UCR as “an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury.” This definition is similar to the one used in most state jurisdictions.

An assault and battery occurs if the victim suffers a temporarily painful blow, even if no injury results. Battery can also involve offensive touching, such as if a man kisses a woman against her will or puts his hands on her body.

People arrested for assault and those identified by victims are usually young, male, and white, although the number of African Americans arrested for assault is disproportionate to their representation in the population.

Assault victims tend to be male, but women also face a significant danger.

Assault rates are highest in urban areas, during summer, and in southern and western regions.

The most common weapons used in assaults are blunt instruments, hands and feet, firearms, and knives.



Robbery – the common law definition, and the one used by the FBI, is “the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.”

Robbery is considered a violent crime because it involves the use of force to obtain money or goods.

Robbery is punished severely because the victim’s life is put in jeopardy. The severity of the punishment is based on the amount of force used during the crime, not the value of the items taken.

Northeastern states have by far the highest robbery rate.

Robbery offenders are disproportionately young, male, minority group members.

Most robberies are stranger-to-stranger robberies.

Street robberies are the most common type, especially in urban areas

The typical armed robber is unlikely to be a professional who carefully studies targets while planning a crime. Instead, the typical robber does not plan crimes, or plans them randomly.


Hate Crimes – or bias crimes are violent acts directed toward a particular person or members of a group merely because the targets share a discernible racial, ethnic, religious, or gender characteristic.

Hate crimes are often unplanned

Usually involve convenient, vulnerable targets who are incapable of fighting back.

http://personal.uncc.edu/mfmckenz/So...Typologies.htm
Very interesting. Thanks for sharing. I think this could be very helpful to alot of people.
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Old 02-04-2006, 02:34 PM
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Crimes in NY fall into the following categories: VFO-Violent felony offenses, CVO-Other crimes of a violent/coercive nature not designated as VFO, PDO-Property, drug and other felonies, MIS-misdemeanors and VIO-violations. The list of VFO's for NY:

Murder 1st & 2nd, Manslaughter 1st, Rape 1st, Robbery 1st & 2nd, Assault 1st & 2nd, Aggr Assault/Peace Off, Gang Asslt 1st & 2nd, Asslt:Police Off/Fireman/EMT, Stalking 1st, Burglary 1st & 2nd, Arson 1st & 2nd, Sodomy 1st, Sex Abuse 1st, Aggr Sex Abuse 1st 2nd & 3rd, Course Sex
Conduct-Child 1st & 2nd, Persistent Sex Abuse, Crim Poss Weap, Crim Sale of Firearm, Crim Use of Firearm, Falsely Reporting Incident, Placing False Bomb, Hinder Prosecution-Terrorism, Support Act of Terrorism, Kidnapping, Intimidation Victim/Witness, Conspiracy

But the one that surprised me the most-Female Genital Mutilation is NOT a Violent Felony! WTF?
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Old 02-06-2006, 12:51 AM
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Wow smile .. thanks for sharing that .. i would think that would be a VF also ..
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Old 02-06-2006, 04:23 PM
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Some states also consider certain drug crimes violent offenses.
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Old 02-10-2006, 12:52 AM
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According to our federal government, if you had under aged pictures on your computer, you're considered violent and that you committed a violent crime.

Even if you never touched a soul, didn't take the pictures, never so much as spoke to anyone or even left your house you're a violent offender. How is that possible??? I don't know but it is!
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Old 02-10-2006, 10:44 AM
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Very interesting e-wife.
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Old 02-10-2006, 11:19 AM
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So what's the difference between Capital Murder and 1st Degree Murder??
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Old 02-10-2006, 11:50 AM
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The death of another person constitutes a capital offense if it involves the death of a peace officer, a murder in the course of committing another first degree felony, murder for hire, killing a child under the age of six, killing more than one person during the same time period, killing a jailer while incarcerated. According to Sherman attorney Bobbie Peterson, the definition is much broader that it used to be. The death penalty can only be sought for a capital offense, but it will not always be sought. The state can seek life in prison instead which for this crime amounts to forty years in prison with no parole. If the state seeks the death penalty, then the issue must be put to a jury. Only the jury can assess death as the punishment.

That's the defination of capital murder
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Old 02-10-2006, 01:55 PM
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okay thanks just wasn't clear on that one
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Old 03-05-2006, 06:09 AM
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What about "assault with intent to do great bodily harm less murder"?

Is that not considered as a violent offense?
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Old 03-05-2006, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rox73
What about "assault with intent to do great bodily harm less murder"?

Is that not considered as a violent offense?
The violent crimes I posted were from NY. Different states have different names for crimes. That might fall under the category of aggravated assault under NY laws or attempted murder maybe?
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Old 03-14-2006, 05:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rox73
What about "assault with intent to do great bodily harm less murder"?

Is that not considered as a violent offense?
EVery state it is classified different but it will always be considered a violent offense .. I think what it is , is that the way they are set up its making you believe that certain things are left out.
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Old 03-15-2006, 06:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by e_wife03
CRIME TYPOLOGIES

VIOLENT CRIMES



Forcible rape – defined in common law as “the carnal knowledge of a female forcibly and against her will.”

Population density influences the rape rate. Metropolitan areas today have rape rates significantly higher than rural areas

Rape is a warm-weather crime with most incidents occurring during July and August and the lowest rates occurring during December, January, and February.

Rape is frequently underreported

Fail to report rapes because they are embarrassed, believe nothing can be done, or blame themselves.

There are two broad categories of rape: stranger-to-stranger rape and acquaintance rape, which includes the subcategories of date rape and marital rape.

Stranger rapes are typically more violent than acquaintance rapes; attackers are more likely to carry a weapon, threaten the victim, and harem her physically.

Stranger rape is over-represented in official statistics because victims who are more viciously harmed are the most likely to contact police.

Statutory rape – sexual relations between an underage minor female and an adult male. Although the sex is not forced or coerced, the law says that young girls are incapable of giving informed consent, so the act is legally considered non-consensual.

Shield laws – protect women from being questioned about their sexual history unless it directly bears on the case



Murder and Homicide – defined in common law as “the unlawful killing of a human being with malice aforethought.

There is no statute of limitations on murder.

First –degree murder occurs when a person kills another after premeditation and deliberation.

Premeditation – killing was considered beforehand and suggests that it was motivated by more than a simple desire to engage in an act of violence.

Deliberation – the killing was planned, after careful thought, rather than carried out on impulse.

Felony murder – a killing accompanying a felony usually constitutes first-degree murder

Second-degree murder – requires the killer to have malice aforethought, but not premeditation or deliberation. It occurs when a person’s wanton disregard for the victim’s life and his or her desire to inflict serious bodily harm on the victim results in the victim’s death.
Manslaughter – homicide without malice and is usually punishable by anywhere between 1 and 15 years in prison.

Voluntary or non-negligent manslaughter- killing in the heat of passion or during a sudden quarrel that provoked violence.

Involuntary or negligent manslaughter – killing that occurs when a person’s acts are negligent and without regard for the harm they may cause others.

Murder victims tend to be males, over 18 years of age.

There is a disturbing trend for African Americans to both commit murder and become murder victims.

Murder tends to be intra-racial

Murder can be separated into those involving strangers, typically stemming from a felony attempt, and acquaintance homicides involving disputes between family, friends, and acquaintances.

Most females who kill their mates do so after suffering repeated violent attacks.



Assault and Battery – refers to two separate crimes. Battery requires offensive touching, such as slapping, hitting, or punching a victim. Assault requires no actual touching but involves either attempted battery or unintentionally frightening the victim by word or deed.

Although common law intended these twin crimes to be misdemeanors, most jurisdictions now upgrade them to felonies either when a weapon is used or when they occur during the commission of a felony.

Serious assault or aggravated assault is defined in the UCR as “an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury.” This definition is similar to the one used in most state jurisdictions.

An assault and battery occurs if the victim suffers a temporarily painful blow, even if no injury results. Battery can also involve offensive touching, such as if a man kisses a woman against her will or puts his hands on her body.

People arrested for assault and those identified by victims are usually young, male, and white, although the number of African Americans arrested for assault is disproportionate to their representation in the population.

Assault victims tend to be male, but women also face a significant danger.

Assault rates are highest in urban areas, during summer, and in southern and western regions.

The most common weapons used in assaults are blunt instruments, hands and feet, firearms, and knives.



Robbery – the common law definition, and the one used by the FBI, is “the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.”

Robbery is considered a violent crime because it involves the use of force to obtain money or goods.

Robbery is punished severely because the victim’s life is put in jeopardy. The severity of the punishment is based on the amount of force used during the crime, not the value of the items taken.

Northeastern states have by far the highest robbery rate.

Robbery offenders are disproportionately young, male, minority group members.

Most robberies are stranger-to-stranger robberies.

Street robberies are the most common type, especially in urban areas

The typical armed robber is unlikely to be a professional who carefully studies targets while planning a crime. Instead, the typical robber does not plan crimes, or plans them randomly.


Hate Crimes – or bias crimes are violent acts directed toward a particular person or members of a group merely because the targets share a discernible racial, ethnic, religious, or gender characteristic.

Hate crimes are often unplanned

Usually involve convenient, vulnerable targets who are incapable of fighting back.

http://personal.uncc.edu/mfmckenz/Socy3173.Crime%
20Typologies.htm
Don't forget "eluding a police officer". That's a violent offence, even if you don't have a gun. Don't run from the police or you will be a violent offender!
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Old 05-31-2007, 04:46 PM
ilovemyinmate07 ilovemyinmate07 is offline
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i wish that here in NY that burglery in the 2nd wasn't consider as a violent crime. it sucks so bad. thats what my husband is in county for and hes looking at 5 years max. it also sucks because nobody was there at the time. Our state is so messed up. when he goes to reception he's going to applay for the VFO Over ride and try to get the violent off of him.
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Old 05-31-2007, 06:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemyinmate07
i wish that here in NY that burglery in the 2nd wasn't consider as a violent crime. it sucks so bad. thats what my husband is in county for and hes looking at 5 years max. it also sucks because nobody was there at the time. Our state is so messed up. when he goes to reception he's going to applay for the VFO Over ride and try to get the violent off of him.
Hello and welcome to the VO forum!I am sorry your guy got pinned witht he VO lable...i never thought burglery was violent crime! I hope he can get it taken off as a violent offense!!


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Old 06-03-2007, 01:18 PM
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this was very interesting! thank you for sharing, but i disagree with this statement!

Quote:
Originally Posted by e_wife03
There is no statute of limitations on murder.
deont'es judge went over the statute of limitations on his charge of vehicular homicide (unless it doesnt apply because its vehicular..) she was in the know about this, and then reduced his sentence. just wanted to point that out!

but thanks again for sharing!
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Old 06-28-2007, 12:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovinmybay
this was very interesting! thank you for sharing, but i disagree with this statement!



deont'es judge went over the statute of limitations on his charge of vehicular homicide (unless it doesnt apply because its vehicular..) she was in the know about this, and then reduced his sentence. just wanted to point that out!

but thanks again for sharing!
I do think that vehicular falls differently from state to state. but thanks for sharing what went on with deont'e
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Old 06-28-2007, 03:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by e_wife03
I do think that vehicular falls differently from state to state. but thanks for sharing what went on with deont'e
which is a huge reason why I don't like to post this kind of info outside of the state forums...too many variables from state to state.


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