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Federal General Prison Talk, Introductions & Chit Chat Topics & Discussions relating to the Federal Prison & the Criminal Justice System that do not fit into any other Federal sub-forum category. Please feel free to also introduce yourself to other members in the state and talk about whatever topics come to mind that may not have anything to do with prison.

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  #1  
Old 06-19-2017, 09:29 AM
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Question What's the difference between State and Federal Prisons?

Gotta vent, and have a lot of questions. I have a friend who was a CA attorney. He was busted for stealing from a clients trust account. He had been a general practice attorney for many years, 18 years discipline free with CA State Attorney's board. He stole over 250,000.00 dollars from a client whom he was handling their living will trust account. To make matters worse, he even went as far as selling the deceased families home to pay off gambling debts. Needless to say I was floored. It appeared on our local news and newspapers here in San Luis Obispo, CA. He appears in Federal Court again on August 8th, 2017. He is currently out on bail, the state board took away his license to practice in CA for 30 days, and put him on probation for one year. Not clear why they would do that. But now he can practice law again since the 30 day time frame has lapsed. And he has a Federal Public Defender. He has 28 counts of wire fraud, and faces 30 years in Federal Prison. He also posted 100,000 bail. How he was able to do that is beyond me unless he put his own home up for the bail. When I was a paralegal I never dealt with cases on a Federal Level. Only state. So my next question is what is the difference between a state prison verse's a Federal Prison? I assume if he gets 30 years in a Federal Prison he will also die in there too which greatly saddens me. He is 55 years old. Are Federal Prisons better then State? Are there "perks" over State Prisons ? He has never broken the law till now. The FBI arrested him last week at his home. I have been unable to contact him as I am concerned over his situation. He admitted to his wrong doings to the client he stole from. And to the FBI. He had been under the radar for several months before they arrested him. I have to wonder too if he would be a flight risk with the charges that are against him. I have known him since we were kids. I am in just disbelief that he would do this to a client. Does Prop 57 apply to Federal Inmates? This is a Non Violent Case, although its at a Federal Level, and I would guess he would be sent to Lompoc CA Federal Prison since he is a San Luis Obispo County resident. I never knew he had a gambling problem and according to the news he used 90,000.00 dollars from the house of the client he sold to pay off his gambling debts. So can someone give me the ups of Federal Prisons what to expect, etc over State Prisons? Thanks. M
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Old 06-19-2017, 09:48 AM
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I can't answer to the perks in Federal vs State, but I can tell you that there is no parole with Federal....he'll serve 85% of that 30 years minus a possible 6 months halfway house.

No, Prop 57 is strictly California state and does not apply to Federal or to any other state.

He could be housed anywhere in the country....usually hundreds of miles (or more) from home

I'm sure he could use a friend ight now, just don't discuss his case with him, you have no "privileged communication" (confidentiality).
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Old 06-19-2017, 10:13 AM
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My guess is that his $100,000.00 bond was as you think it was. I too had the same federal bond amount, and I was released after signing a document that said I would forfeit my house to the government if I violated my bond conditions.

No money changed hands, and once I arrived in prison, the bond was expunged. Much easier and less expensive than paying a bail bondsman's commission. Not everyone qualifies, but if the magistrate-judge is convinced that he led a good life until he messed up, it is one option that is available to them.

Because of CA Parole versus zero federal parole, I would choose a California sentence, especially if he has enough political connections to be sent to a SNY. The FBI and the US Dept. of "Justice" can force the case into federal court, so he probably won't have any choice in where he is tried.

The ferocity of conditions within the federal prison system depends heavily on the custody level of the prison he is sent to, the higher level prisons (USP/supermax/SMU, etc.) the harsher they are.

Lawyers who were willing to assist other prisoners with legal issues were treated well (except for the scammers).
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Old 06-19-2017, 10:24 AM
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I can't answer to the perks in Federal vs State, but I can tell you that there is no parole with Federal....he'll serve 85% of that 30 years minus a possible 6 months halfway house.

No, Prop 57 is strictly California state and does not apply to Federal or to any other state.

He could be housed anywhere in the country....usually hundreds of miles (or more) from home

I'm sure he could use a friend ight now, just don't discuss his case with him, you have no "privileged communication" (confidentiality).
I just want to make sure he is alright. Haven't been able to contact him, and don't know where he is. His cell # is disconnected. I can't imagine he thought he would get away with this. He has never been in a county jail other then to meet with a inmate concerning their case's, as I do know that attorney verse's client is strictly confidential. I don't understand why the State Board of CA Attorneys would put him on probation for one year. Unless this case and discovery is more then anyone but him an his Federal Public Defender knows. Lots of unanswered questions. What really gets me is how they allowed him to post bail as this is a very serious situation. What really saddens me is how he just flushed everything he worked so hard to do in his life.
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Old 06-19-2017, 01:55 PM
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So far he hasn't been convicted of a crime, so my guess is that the CA Bar Assn will come down much harder on him if/when he is. I have a bigger problem with the other side of the bail/bond issue, where a prosecutor embellishes a case by making someone who is only accused of a crime look like they are Jack the Ripper. The comment that "I could indict a ham sandwich" is unfortunately true. The only evidence (or exaggerated/falsified accusations) the grand jurors ever see is what the prosecutor chooses to show them, true or not.

An explanation of why a successful person does stupid criminal acts will have to come from him, if he even knows why. In some cases, their public persona doesn't match their actual morality.
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Old 06-19-2017, 02:37 PM
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Have you tried the "lost in the system" sub-forum here?

Forget everything you ever read about "Club Fed". Things were never that good and have gotten worse. On the other hand it's a lot better than you would think from the movies.

If I understand the BOP scoring system right, his security level will depend in part on how long his sentence is. Given his age and that it's a non-violent charge, if he gets a favorable plea deal he might wind up in a minimum security camp. See Bernard Kerik's "From Jailer to Jailed" for the good and bad parts of that. He'll be physically safe as long as he stays healthy.

One thing the BOP does that many states don't do is electronic messaging. It's not email like you usually think of it but he'll be able to stay in real-time touch with his friends and family as long as he has money for it. There's even video chat if I understand right.

Also -- there's a great chance he'll end up with something nowhere near the maximum sentence.
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Old 06-20-2017, 01:56 AM
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Have you tried the "lost in the system" sub-forum here?

Forget everything you ever read about "Club Fed". Things were never that good and have gotten worse. On the other hand it's a lot better than you would think from the movies.

If I understand the BOP scoring system right, his security level will depend in part on how long his sentence is. Given his age and that it's a non-violent charge, if he gets a favorable plea deal he might wind up in a minimum security camp. See Bernard Kerik's "From Jailer to Jailed" for the good and bad parts of that. He'll be physically safe as long as he stays healthy.

One thing the BOP does that many states don't do is electronic messaging. It's not email like you usually think of it but he'll be able to stay in real-time touch with his friends and family as long as he has money for it. There's even video chat if I understand right.

Also -- there's a great chance he'll end up with something nowhere near the maximum sentence.
No not yet because he is not in jail. Or prison, he goes to Fed Court in L.A. here in CA Aug 8th. I know his passport has been taken away for ever. And his brother who is a total prick is having a field day over his younger brother being busted over a living trust. May take a drive up to his house and see how he is doing. I am sure he is freaking out. He comes from a family of lawyers. Here in our county when one lawyer fucks up, the other lawyers snob him. Its a very sad situation. I know he filed bankrupt in 2015, so maybe that explains why he took advantage of a client. He did plead not guilty yet he admitted to the FBI and to his Fed Pub Defender he screwed up. I don't know if that would make a difference in sentencing or not. I just feel badly for him. 18 years free of fuckin' over any clients before till this came to light. Breaks my heart to see an attorney and friend flush his life down the toilet.
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Old 06-20-2017, 09:03 AM
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As a lawyer of good standing before this he probably has a clean record. Your charge and your record determine your sentence. The better the record, the more lenient the sentence ie it normally falls on the lighter end if any sentencing guidelines. Since he's nonviolent with a clean record he will probably be housed in a low/minimum facility. Camps are only for people serving short sentences or close to release.
Being out on bond is good as it allows him to get his affairs in order. He should also ask for self-surrender since it will afford him the luxury of knowing when he has to turn himself in and where he will do his time. He can request to be housed close to home, but they will place him wherever there is space.
He will normally do 85% of his time which includes time off for good behavior.
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Old 06-20-2017, 05:30 PM
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I agree with what bemoreicon except that minimum security camp eligibility is for sentences of 10 years or less, as long as the prisoner doesn't also qualify for a "public safety factor" (which like everything else bop doesn't necessarily have much to do with public safety).

If he is allowed to self surrender to prison by his judge, that will also reduce his custody score. Here's the program statement they use to decide what security level prison to send him to.
https://www.bop.gov/policy/progstat/5100_008.pdf
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Old 06-21-2017, 07:11 PM
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As a lawyer of good standing before this he probably has a clean record. Your charge and your record determine your sentence. The better the record, the more lenient the sentence ie it normally falls on the lighter end if any sentencing guidelines. Since he's nonviolent with a clean record he will probably be housed in a low/minimum facility. Camps are only for people serving short sentences or close to release.
Being out on bond is good as it allows him to get his affairs in order. He should also ask for self-surrender since it will afford him the luxury of knowing when he has to turn himself in and where he will do his time. He can request to be housed close to home, but they will place him wherever there is space.
He will normally do 85% of his time which includes time off for good behavior.
He never has been to prison, and according to the State Bar of CA he was suspended for 30 days, but now can practice law again. I am from San Luis Obispo County, there fore would he be sent to Lompoc? I can't see him being sent out of State. I thought 30 years with what the DA here says 28 counts was extreme. I don't understand much of Fed Law verse's State law. I just want what is best for him. He is on 1 year probation. What would that mean? And would he have a GPS tracker? I don't think he would be allowed to leave the county of which both of us reside. The more info I can get to understand the laws of Federal the better. He was arrested at his home by the FBI. What on earth would the FBI be involved with this? Because of the amount he took from his client or that he sold there home that was in a trust account to pay off gambling debts. I appreciate you taking the time to help me understand the laws pertaining to Fed laws. He was able to post 100,000.00 dollar bail, which I would think if it was that serious there is no way in hell he would be able to post bail. M
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Old 06-21-2017, 07:38 PM
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Bail is given if the person is not considered a flight risk and due to his long upstanding character and community ties he received it. Its high but as long as he goes to court he'll be fine. The feds are involved because it involves a bank or banking process which is federal jurisdiction since most banks are insured by the FDIC which is a federal thing. My son's father went to federal prison for mortgage fraud for the same reason. Probation comes after the sentencing in lieu of or after prison time. It can be monitored through an ankle bracelet which restricts time and places of movement or it can be w/o GPS where he just has regular Probation Officer visits.
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Old 06-21-2017, 08:01 PM
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>What on earth would the FBI be involved with this? I don't know. One possibility is that if any part of his (alleged ...) misconduct went through the mail or an interstate phone call then it would have become a Federal offense as a result. Do you have a PACER account? It might shed some light. If you're trying to prepare yourself emotionally, poke around in the Federal sentencing guidelines and figure out your friend's point score. The recommended sentence range is almost certain to be much less than the maximum that you're reading about. Also keep in mind that over 97% of Federal cases end in a plea deal to reduced charges.
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Old 06-21-2017, 09:16 PM
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State Bar disciplinary is something that leaves the Bar with their hands tied in the absence of actual conviction. As a result, you see attorneys in EVERY State that have charges pending but still can practice. The fact that they screwed SOME clients in the past does not mean they are necessarily shitty attorneys...and so there are SOME prospective clients that will still hire them.

Where there is a probation imposed while the case is pending, it may also put limits on what can and cannot be done in terms of their practice, to include requirements that a third-party have oversight of the financials.

Sadly, a quarter-million is nothing in terms of embezzlement/misapplication of fiduciary responsibility. Through the years, I have had multiple clients that were former attorneys. The ones that were under a half-mil in losses were the ones who only violated the trust of ONE or TWO clients. On the upside, from the view of the public, is that they often do MORE time than Jon or Suzy Q Criminal would have done for theft precisely because it IS an abuse of trust.

Bail of $100K is actually relatively low considering the amount at issue. By example, I know of several jurisdictions where theft/financial crimes tend to see bonds set at a figure of AT LEAST twice the estimated loss. Factor in that on a bond like $100K, he may only have had to come up with $10K and obtaining the release on that amount is NOT that difficult in most places...hell, you could put that on a credit card and then later default on the card but still show up for court and you got your bond for free and the bondsman suffers no loss (yes, many bond offices take credit cards nowadays).
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Old 06-21-2017, 10:35 PM
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State Bar disciplinary is something that leaves the Bar with their hands tied in the absence of actual conviction. As a result, you see attorneys in EVERY State that have charges pending but still can practice. The fact that they screwed SOME clients in the past does not mean they are necessarily shitty attorneys...and so there are SOME prospective clients that will still hire them.

Where there is a probation imposed while the case is pending, it may also put limits on what can and cannot be done in terms of their practice, to include requirements that a third-party have oversight of the financials.

Sadly, a quarter-million is nothing in terms of embezzlement/misapplication of fiduciary responsibility. Through the years, I have had multiple clients that were former attorneys. The ones that were under a half-mil in losses were the ones who only violated the trust of ONE or TWO clients. On the upside, from the view of the public, is that they often do MORE time than Jon or Suzy Q Criminal would have done for theft precisely because it IS an abuse of trust.

Bail of $100K is actually relatively low considering the amount at issue. By example, I know of several jurisdictions where theft/financial crimes tend to see bonds set at a figure of AT LEAST twice the estimated loss. Factor in that on a bond like $100K, he may only have had to come up with $10K and obtaining the release on that amount is NOT that difficult in most places...hell, you could put that on a credit card and then later default on the card but still show up for court and you got your bond for free and the bondsman suffers no loss (yes, many bond offices take credit cards nowadays).
After speaking with him tonight, it truly amazes me how the media makes a big deal over this issue. he told me he didn't have to put up 100,000 bail he only signed his name and was released on OR. He was the trustee for this persons case. He had control over everything in regards to the person who died, and his/her daughter. He was paid for the expenses occurred through the living will. He has all receipts pertaining to what he was suppose to do. And he will fight tooth and nail to get back what she lied about. I will testify on his behalf as I have known him as I said since we were kids. we grew up together and he was once my own attorney through a issue of landlord tenant laws in which I won the case because the landlord lied about every damn thing you could think of. So as I go along and learn about Federal Prisons verse's State Prisons I thank you all for your advice and what could happen. I hope to see he will get home detention and not prison. He may have crossed the line on somethings, but prison to this degree is bullshit.
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Old 06-21-2017, 11:40 PM
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Gotta vent, and have a lot of questions. I have a friend who was a CA attorney. He was busted for stealing from a clients trust account. He had been a general practice attorney for many years, 18 years discipline free with CA State Attorney's board. He stole over 250,000.00 dollars from a client whom he was handling their living will trust account. To make matters worse, he even went as far as selling the deceased families home to pay off gambling debts. Needless to say I was floored. It appeared on our local news and newspapers here in San Luis Obispo, CA. He appears in Federal Court again on August 8th, 2017. He is currently out on bail, the state board took away his license to practice in CA for 30 days, and put him on probation for one year. Not clear why they would do that. But now he can practice law again since the 30 day time frame has lapsed. And he has a Federal Public Defender. He has 28 counts of wire fraud, and faces 30 years in Federal Prison. He also posted 100,000 bail. How he was able to do that is beyond me unless he put his own home up for the bail. When I was a paralegal I never dealt with cases on a Federal Level. Only state. So my next question is what is the difference between a state prison verse's a Federal Prison? I assume if he gets 30 years in a Federal Prison he will also die in there too which greatly saddens me. He is 55 years old. Are Federal Prisons better then State? Are there "perks" over State Prisons ? He has never broken the law till now. The FBI arrested him last week at his home. I have been unable to contact him as I am concerned over his situation. He admitted to his wrong doings to the client he stole from. And to the FBI. He had been under the radar for several months before they arrested him. I have to wonder too if he would be a flight risk with the charges that are against him. I have known him since we were kids. I am in just disbelief that he would do this to a client. Does Prop 57 apply to Federal Inmates? This is a Non Violent Case, although its at a Federal Level, and I would guess he would be sent to Lompoc CA Federal Prison since he is a San Luis Obispo County resident. I never knew he had a gambling problem and according to the news he used 90,000.00 dollars from the house of the client he sold to pay off his gambling debts. So can someone give me the ups of Federal Prisons what to expect, etc over State Prisons? Thanks. M
There is a lot to consider here. First my main concern is that you say he admitted wrong doing to the FBI, this was a very big mistake if that is the case. The moment he had any indication he was under investigation or if he was served with a search and seizure warrant by the FBI, an attorney should have been retained immediately and he should not have spoke to them period. Any chance of any possible defense is pretty much gone once he admitted fault or wrong doing to an FBI agent who is conducting the investigation for the government.

I will outline for you in simplified terms the process of a Federal criminal case.
1. Initially there would have to be a complaint of possible criminal conduct (someone called the FBI, or the possible criminal conduct was discovered in some way).
2. The FBI would need to provide probable cause to the court in order to obtain a search warrant, search and seizure warrant or arrest warrant. Meaning, they would have had to have some type of evidence and it really doesn't have to be much, just enough for probable cause.
3. The Assistant United States Attorney or United States Attorney (prosecutors for the Federal Government) would have to go in front of the federal grand jury made up of 16-23 people and present evidence to them. The grand jury will then vote to "true-bill" meaning charge the offenses or "no-bill" meaning they do not charge the defendant with criminal charges.
4. Once the grand jury true-bills the indictment is issued and the defendant is summoned most likely via arrest warrant. An indictment is just a document detailing the charges (counts), and a detailed description of what the FBI and government believe the criminal conduct was in the particular case. The defendant is innocent until proven guilty still at this point in the process.
5. The defendant will make an initial appearance and be arraigned on the charges and a plea of not guilty will be entered. At that time release conditions will be set (secured or unsecured bond). Additional hearings will be set and then either a change of plea hearing or a trial will be set.
6. If the defendant is found guilty by a jury trial, or pleads guilty then a sentencing hearing will be scheduled.
7. The defendant will be sentenced based on the federal sentencing guidelines and also with consideration of 18 USC 3553(a).

Now I will touch on some of these things in more detail. First, I understand that the government and media is going to quote the maximum statutory penalties for the particular offense, in this case wire fraud. The maximum statutory penalty for wire fraud may be 30 years imprisonment. However, this does not mean he will be sentenced to 30 years, that is the maximum. There is a lot that goes into how the sentence is calculated at the Federal level. They will look at the federal sentencing guidelines and the chart. They will look up the base offense level and increase it due to certain enhancements (amount of loss to victims, number of victims, major or minor role in the offense, etc). Then all those points will get added up and then they will look at the sentencing chart and see where his overall offense level falls and the chart will tell them the range in months for a sentence. Keep in mind the federal sentencing guidelines are not mandatory anymore so the Judge can go above or below the guidelines sentencing range.

Once he is sentenced assuming a term of imprisonment is imposed the Federal Bureau of Prisons will designate a prison the send him to, and it can be anywhere in the United States. He can request a specific prison and the Judge can make that recommendation, but it is still up to BOP on where the send him. Typically they don't send people super far from their home and family, but it does happen and there is no rhyme or reason to it really. Before he is sentenced a Pre-Sentence Investigation is conducted and the BOP uses this report to place him at a specific facility and they use it to determine the security level too.

You can signed up for an account at pacer.gov and lookup his case. If you have First and Last name you can search by that. Once you find it you can look at the "Documents", which should include the indictment.

There is a lot to a Federal case, but I doubt your friend will serve 30 years. I don't know all the details of the case, but what you have stated suggests it is not a huge case considering the cases the Federal government prosecutes.

Feel free to ask me any questions, I have a very decent knowledge of the Federal criminal justice system.
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Old 06-22-2017, 09:29 AM
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Here's the Federal sentencing guidelines. Work out the "offense level", which depends on the amount allegedly stolen and whether there were some other nasty things done, and check the chart to see what the recommended sentence will be.

http://www.ussc.gov/sites/default/fi...2015/2B1.1.pdf

A shorter explanation directly to the point is at the web site of a white collar defense attorney.
http://dmcantor.com/fraud-theft-crim...ederal-charge/
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Federal Bank, Mail and Wire Fraud offenses are automatically given a base offense level of seven. In addition, there is an increase in a sentencing level depending on the amount of monetary loss (for example, $5,000 or more adds two levels; $10,000 or more adds four levels; etc. all the way up to $400,000 or more-which adds thirty levels. Also, additional levels are added for a multitude of other factors (such as number of victims, whether mass mailing was used, whether there was a misrepresentation that the defendant was acting on the behalf of a charitable group of Governmental agency, whether $1,000,000 in gross receipts were obtained from one or more financial institutions, whether it involved the violations of security law and the defendant was an officer or director of a publicly traded corporation, etc.). A standard example with minimum aggravators would involve a defendant with no prior significant record who was accused of taking more than $200,000, (but less than $400,000) would be assigned a base level of nineteen, which would result in a sentence of thirty to thirty seven months in prison.
The Pre-Sentence Investigation is going to be the BOP's guide to all actions if he goes to prison. If you get interviewed for it that's a really good time to mention things like whether he needs a gluten-free diet or anything else that might improve conditions for him. For example, if it were true, "I drove him to the hospital when he missed a dose of ___", said to the Federal probation officer interviewing you, greatly helps his chances of getting medication ____ in prison. "I've known him twenty years", if it's on the record, means you qualify to get on his approved visitors list. If he's like most (not all!) prisoners the visits will mean more to him that anyone on the outside can even understand.

Oh, if there's a conviction, there are several good resources here on PTO about how to write an effective letter of support to give the judge reasons to pick a lower sentence. There's also something about that on a lawyer's site called popehat.com.
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Old 06-22-2017, 10:06 AM
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Getting back to the subject line of the thread, here's one difference between (many not all) state prisons and Federal ones.

There's no place that lets you mail in presents but some states let you buy care packages from vendors the system trusts, to be shipped straight from the vendor to the inmate.

There's no such thing in Fed-land. Everything that's not a book or magazine has to come from the commissary.

Federal prisons are far better than the worst state prisons like Arizona's or Florida's. Overcrowding is often an issue.

Let's see, the important issue here is actually your own well-being. Unless you're in that minority of people who feels calmer knowing everything that can go wrong then you're better off skipping the research you're doing and taking things one day at a time ("sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof"). I'm in that minority myself so I'll understand if you want to keep researching.
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Old 08-27-2017, 09:15 PM
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Question Whats the difference between Fed and State?

I have an attorney friend who has been accused of mishandling a clients trust accounts. He is still active with the CA Attorney's bar. But this is a Federal Case. He has a Federal Public Defender. What is the difference between the two? Fed and State? I know State, city Public Defenders are A holes and most end up in prison anyways. They say he faces 30 years in a Federal Prison here in CA. How many Federal Prisons are in CA? This one is all new to me. I feel he should get a private Federal Attorney to handle this case, as I think they are no better then a reg. Public Defender. I should caption that and say he should get a private attorney at Fed level to handle his case. Can anyone explain how this works? Thanks!
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Old 08-27-2017, 09:49 PM
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Fed is the entire us. The entire US is a bit much to conceptualize and to run, so things get broken down into federal district courts. Each state has at least two, and I'm wagering CA has more than two due to its size.

Now, assuming he is convicted on the federal charges, he's not going to serve his time in a CA state prison. He will go through the BOP processing and take a bed in a facility relevant to his risk level. Said prison could be anywhere in the US.

He's going to stay active in the state bar (as in active member in good standing) until there's a conviction, or until the bar does its own investigation as to whether the guy violated the bar rules. Generally, screwing with a client trust fund is a big no-no, and a finding by the bar disciplinary committee that he screwed with a client trust fund will get him permanently disbarred. A bar has the ability to sanction a lawyer for misdeeds ranging from a private talking to, a public sanction, requiring remediation in ethics, requiring psychological counseling or drug/alcohol rehab (where relevant), and removing a lawyer from the role of lawyers for any period up to and including permanently. So, suspended, disbarred, disbarred until, disbarred permanently, there,s no way to rehabilitate yourself in the eyes of the bar. The bar cannot sentence somebody to prison. Prison, however, can get a person disbarred as it is de facto proof of malfeasance.

State is completely different, but you're really not asking about that one. If CA has its attorney disciplinary records online, you'll probably find an active case pending against the lawyer.
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Old 08-28-2017, 03:55 AM
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As a lawyer, he will already know how to get the best legal representation for his case, PD or private counsel. The first step will be for him to interview his actual federal public defender. If he decides that the PD is his best option, then he already has his lawyer.

If he has enough money to hire private counsel, he may not qualify for a PD anyway.
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Old 09-04-2017, 10:15 PM
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Question Fed vs State Laws

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Originally Posted by fbopnomore View Post
As a lawyer, he will already know how to get the best legal representation for his case, PD or private counsel. The first step will be for him to interview his actual federal public defender. If he decides that the PD is his best option, then he already has his lawyer.

If he has enough money to hire private counsel, he may not qualify for a PD anyway.
I read the article about AZ, similar to CA laws. He said the person and its statement of facts is wrong. I can't see how he could be all over CA or NV when he has a law practice. She the person she claims robbed her out of thousands has a history of mental health issues. I will read the other post with the link to it. When I was a paralegal I had seen case's that the person who committed a crime, and even though we did our best to prove innocent and they lost & were sent to State, we had one case where the family got so pissed off they turned the attorney I worked for into the State Bar, like to get even per say. It took a toll on his practice, he to was given 30 days and then allowed to return to practice although he had to go through instructions on how to treat prospective clients. Criminal defense. The end result to the issue at hand was through investigation, it was found the family lied just to get even. The attorney I did work for, has since left practice after having some idiot put a hit out on him because the person he rep'ed, was sentenced to state prison. Not to make fun of the situation at hand, but in the make believe movie "Liar, Liar," the truth of this matter will hopefully set him free.
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Old 09-05-2017, 06:48 PM
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A lot of times the bond in the federal system is a signature bond. Unsecured collateral. Mine was a drug case, $150,000 but I was out that day.
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Old 09-13-2017, 09:31 PM
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Question Whats the difference between Fed & State Prisons?

He had a court appearance, and was able to see and read what this person had to say. Lie, after lie. On her part, not my lawyer friend. It pisses me off that he who has been 20+ years on the State Bar here in CA with no acts of wrong doing to have someone do this to him. I would have to say without seeing the documents she stated, and with her bi polar issues, she has a lot of explaining to do being of what she told the State Bar over what he did, which in fact he didn't do. Once his Fed PD has her life turned upside down, she will get a taste of what it feels like to file a false judgment against her deceased boyfriend. He elected NOT to pursue the case he had been hired to do after the boyfriend died. The media here has a field day when an attorney is arrested without knowing what the case pertains too and what is in the legal documents. He called me and told me his Fed PD would be making contact with me, in reference to his behavior as a General Attorney practice. He was once my own attorney in a case where it was a landlord tenant issue. He could have ripped off more then the 33% allowed by state law with any CA attorney. I need to caption he plead not guilty, did not state any facts to what she told the State Bar. An attorney has the legal right to except and deny any case. And in this case, he elected to not represent her, as this was not about her, but about her boyfriend that died. He was his attorney over the living will. She has severe mental health issues, and according to people who know her so far to date this isn't the first time she has attempted to screw over a innocent person who was hired by the boyfriend prior to his death. Its a mess. And I hope that the State and the FBI after they get through pulling her through hell, it will be dropped. He does have to do a 1 year State Bar school. It will be interesting to see what goes on in a Federal Court, as he will have me testify on his behalf. I don't know this person who has claimed any thing that would be considered wrong doing. I just hope they put her away for false information.
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Old 09-16-2017, 02:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjaminsbaby View Post
I have an attorney friend who has been accused of mishandling a clients trust accounts. He is still active with the CA Attorney's bar. But this is a Federal Case. He has a Federal Public Defender. What is the difference between the two? Fed and State? I know State, city Public Defenders are A holes and most end up in prison anyways. They say he faces 30 years in a Federal Prison here in CA. How many Federal Prisons are in CA? This one is all new to me. I feel he should get a private Federal Attorney to handle this case, as I think they are no better then a reg. Public Defender. I should caption that and say he should get a private attorney at Fed level to handle his case. Can anyone explain how this works? Thanks!


It is highly possible he cannot afford a high-powered attorney.... you said he is a gambler and stole from clients to pay off debts.

Does your friend who has not been through the court system know you are putting all of his business out here for ALL to see....including prosecution? You have admitted to his wrongdoing and spoken of his words here..... If he has yet to be proven guilty----Don't make it worse on him than it already is.

It wouldn't take much to find out exactly what case you are talking about. You have given details, location, occupation, and "facts" according to him.
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Old 09-16-2017, 02:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjaminsbaby View Post
He had a court appearance, and was able to see and read what this person had to say. Lie, after lie. On her part, not my lawyer friend. It pisses me off that he who has been 20+ years on the State Bar here in CA with no acts of wrong doing to have someone do this to him. I would have to say without seeing the documents she stated, and with her bi polar issues, she has a lot of explaining to do being of what she told the State Bar over what he did, which in fact he didn't do. Once his Fed PD has her life turned upside down, she will get a taste of what it feels like to file a false judgment against her deceased boyfriend. He elected NOT to pursue the case he had been hired to do after the boyfriend died. The media here has a field day when an attorney is arrested without knowing what the case pertains too and what is in the legal documents. He called me and told me his Fed PD would be making contact with me, in reference to his behavior as a General Attorney practice. He was once my own attorney in a case where it was a landlord tenant issue. He could have ripped off more then the 33% allowed by state law with any CA attorney. I need to caption he plead not guilty, did not state any facts to what she told the State Bar. An attorney has the legal right to except and deny any case. And in this case, he elected to not represent her, as this was not about her, but about her boyfriend that died. He was his attorney over the living will. She has severe mental health issues, and according to people who know her so far to date this isn't the first time she has attempted to screw over a innocent person who was hired by the boyfriend prior to his death. Its a mess. And I hope that the State and the FBI after they get through pulling her through hell, it will be dropped. He does have to do a 1 year State Bar school. It will be interesting to see what goes on in a Federal Court, as he will have me testify on his behalf. I don't know this person who has claimed any thing that would be considered wrong doing. I just hope they put her away for false information.


You seem to be enjoying this.....mental illness is not a joke nor is dragging someone through hell and turning their life upside down.

I know nothing about you or your friend.... and I am very new to this whole prison thing BUT what I do think I know is that the Federal Gov't does not normally file frivolous cases. I think the conviction rate in Fed'l courts are as high as 93%.

It may not be as cut and dry as you think.
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