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Oregon General Prison Talk, Introductions & Chit Chat Topics & Discussions relating to Prison & the Criminal Justice System in Oregon that do not fit into any other Oregon sub-forum category. Please feel free to also introduce yourself to other members in the state and talk about whatever topics come to mind that may not have anything to do with prison.

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  #26  
Old 03-15-2013, 11:41 AM
ElleLovesNoth ElleLovesNoth is offline
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Its both. isn't it?
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:49 PM
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It varies from one prison to the next. My dad hasn't had his papers asked for, but at other institutions, it's very common. Depends on where he ends up, unfortunately. Many sex offenders come up with a good cover story ("she lied about her age" is a common one) and stick to it. Some just lay low and try to avoid notice. If he does come up with a cover story, make sure it's believable - for instance, Oregon has a Romeo and Juliet law, so depending on his age "she was 17" might not actually explain his charge (I don't know what his charge is, so I can't say what a good cover story would be).

If you haven't already seen it, up above the state/regional forums there's another forum called LASO or Loving a Sex Offender. If you haven't checked it out yet, I compassionately suggest you do. There are a lot of people there who can offer you all kinds of support.

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  #28  
Old 03-17-2013, 01:35 AM
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My LO is in on Assault charges, not a sex offense, but paperwork appears to be quite commonly asked for at SRCI. He got celled up with a SO when he got transferred into honors housing. He wasn't thrilled about it, but has never mentioned having to collect rent from him. Maybe things relax a bit once in honors? Then again, I certainly don't profess to know everything that happens behind those walls.
As others have mentioned on this thread, papers or not, if he's in as a SO, his reputation of not being a "good guy" is going to happen. If he's not in as a SO, having his paperwork to prove it is critically important, especially in the beginning.
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  #29  
Old 03-18-2013, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by ElleLovesNoth View Post
So scott. You suggest that an offender not pay rent and get beat up a few times? Cause My brother in law has a friend that said just pay up and get through it. I thought you said they should stay invisible? Standing up for yourself is not invisible. Its sad to me that church would be equated with only sexual sins. Dont we all deserve to go to hell? Oh well it is what it is. So what do you think. How long have you been out by the way. How come everyone says oregon has special prisons for sex offenders. Your the first person who i heard different from.
I've been out for 3.5 years. As previously mentioned, Oregon does NOT have a designated prison for sex offenders (although Washington State DOES).

Your brother-in-law should not pay rent, because as previously stated, it just gets escalated. He has to stand up for himself, or his prison experience will be much more negative than it needs to be.
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  #30  
Old 04-01-2013, 11:50 PM
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There is NO special place in Oregon for sex offenders.....on the record. However, I know a lot get placed at TRCI and put in quads with each other. It all boils down to where the State has bed space. That is ultimately what decides which bus you get on out of TRCI.

I don't know of anyone who has been inside that will tell you that there is a special prison for S/Os. They are mistaken.
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  #31  
Old 06-07-2013, 03:41 PM
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I have a lo in two rivers. He has the label of SO. Problems an SO may encounter can be resolved through those in authority within the prison without knowing who 'snitched'. How? You who are on the 'outside' can contact the Prison Administration and report the problem as told to you by the inmate. I know because I did it for my LO and it was awesome to have the problem dealt with promptly and none of those who were causing the problem knew what hit them! You can do one of several things actually: email Randy Geer, Chief of Inmate Services and he will give you advice and forward your concern to the prison superintendent. OR call the prison and tell them what you are calling about and they will transfer you to the proper person to talk to. Or the inmate can put out a kyte to talk to his counsellor who can forward the problem to administration. I advise talking to the superintendent or assistant if possible..There will be a very quiet investigation that will take place and if an inmate or inmates are caught doing what was reported they will be immediately dealt with. And no one will know who told unless the inamte themselves isnt wise enough to keep quiet! Prison administration want their prisons to have good records for safety etc and are GLAD when told of problems. They are not the enemy, but actually can be trusted allies when you are dealing with issues. Its your taxes, your prison, and your loved ones in it. Don't be a nuisance with trivial matters but be aware that you can be heard and your legitimate concerns for you incarcerated loved one will be respected and answered.
One other point I would like to make is this: It really is better to refuse to pay rent, one reason that wasnt mentioned is that YOU can get into trouble for paying it! It is simply breaking prison rules either way. If a guard knows about it and it is found that he has turned a blind eye to it he will be in trouble. So, skip the guards and go to the top!
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  #32  
Old 06-13-2013, 09:58 AM
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Sorry for not posting for a while, I'm in the midst of my final 3 or 4 units (2 this 13 week period, 1 or 2 the next, I cannot recall) before I graduate for my first of three degrees.

Although I got out of prison April 2009 (from OSP) I have to say that mommalee's advice is not sound. There are far, far too many ways that inmates find out about things like that. It may not have happened in that one instance but there are enough gang affiliated members who have "buddied" up with officers that trying to go above them ultimately ends at the same position.

One of the most significant lessons that I learned in my three weeks as a cellie to an STG (early on in my sentence) was that often the biggest snitches (and they wouldn't consider themselves that though that's often technically what they were doing) were the STGs themselves -- they have their hands and their ears in everything.

My advice to everyone not an STG including "good fellas" and sex offenders is the same -- keep your eyes open on your own shit and ignore as much of everything else as you possibly can. The more you involve yourself with other people's garbage the more you can be accused of doing something wrong. It's NOT only the sex offenders who get extorted - they're only the easiest targets.
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  #33  
Old 07-11-2013, 03:36 PM
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Wolv49, I am sorry you misunderstood my information. I am not advocating snitching to authorities about every little thing-- I am simply giving ACCURATE INFORMATION that can be used if an inmate finds themselve in an intolerable or bad situation. In this case several so's were helpless in a A BAD situation gang members created and by going directly to the asst superintendent by someone on the outside (me) and relating the problem it was found to be true and dealt with immediately and effectively. The unit dynamics improved for everyone and NO one, not even the guards, knew how the problem was 'discovered.' Wolv49, your experiences arent the only experiences in the prison system and there are others who would benefit from my information. Your advice is good as far as it goes but it doesnt address how to deal with a dangerous or bad situation an inmate may find themeselves in through no fault of their own!!!!!!
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  #34  
Old 08-11-2013, 11:41 PM
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I was in the Oregon prison system as a sex offender from 1994 to 2003 and I can say that it was a hard time. I refused to pay rent and was constantly in fights. I was afraid that if I started to pay rent that it would just escalate. I lost the majority of these fights (had to be hospitalized 3 different times). I did a lot of hole time too. Around the year 2000, SRCI started a work program involving telemarketing that paid around $130 a month. I managed to get into it 3 times, losing my position the first two times due to fights. The third time, I agreed to pay Aryan Nations $30 a month and just figured it was the cost of having a decent paying job in prison. However, I was a bit surprised to see them sticking up for me after an inmate from a different gang tried to start a fight with me. I continued to pay even after they closed down the work program and eventually ended up in the honor complex (#1 when I was there). I finally realized that the gang had an economic incentive to protect me.
Anyway, paying extortion doesn't always lead to things getting worse. I think a lot depends on the person. As for paperwork, I know that sometimes people get lucky and manage to hide their true crimes, but usually someone finds out the truth. Either from a guard or having someone on the outside do a quick internet search.
BTW, I went back to prison from 2008 to 2010 at CRCI, but this time with clean paperwork. It was a hundred times easier - like being in summer camp.
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  #35  
Old 08-15-2013, 05:31 PM
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If you are a SO you try to hide it, but fact is your cellie is likely to ask you and then you are asked to move by count like Scott said or some just "handle" it out of what it is.. My man came out of the hole and said I'll be out unless of course I get celled with a freak meaning he'd go right back to the hole. Just the standard.
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Old 04-03-2018, 05:14 AM
GrannaSAnne GrannaSAnne is offline
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My brother is 71 and just convicted of "Sex Abuse 1 New" and "Encouraging Child Abuse Sex 1". After reading this thread I am so scared for his safety. He has multiple sclerosis. In his condition, he couldn't stand up for himself so if he got beat up it would most likely kill him. I am so confused by reading some forums saying he will be ok and others saying he will be easy prey.
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  #37  
Old 04-03-2018, 06:11 AM
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Granna, listen to what Scott has said in this thread. Scott spent 15 years as a guest of the state of Oregon. He also helped me to help keep my Dad safe.

Here's the scoop: if people go in and make a big scene about themselves, they will become a free target. Most older folks who are entering prison for the first time are assumed to be sex offenders even if they don't say a word to anyone about their crime. This is assumed by the population because very few older people enter the prison system for the first time for any other crime.

To stay safe, your brother must remember that he will be at the bottom of the pecking order. He will be looked down upon by everyone around him who isn't a sex offender.

So he needs to stay relatively invisible. He needs to go in with his mouth shut and his eyes open, he needs to observe until he's figured out what the chain of command is - both with inmates and guards. And that chain of command may have nothing to do with the official chain of command. Then he needs to be very careful about who he's going to chat with.

What tends to happen is that the sex offenders all kind of group together. They often are the ones who are carrying around bibles or going to all the religious gatherings (don't know why).

The guards are not his friends. He needs to be civil and courteous but not look like he's trying to make friends with them - that sets him up to be called out as a snitch later, which would be far, far worse than being called a 'freak' or whatever the local lingo is for a sex offender (chomo, in some prisons, in Oregon, I believe 'freak' is the most common and it is a very derogatory word). He needs to develop a thick skin and learn to let the verbal stuff roll off him.

I'll repeat this again: it is highly unlikely that your brother will get beaten up or physically harmed. He may get sucked into other problems though - he should not gamble, at all, on anything, not even 'for fun sports pools'. He should not pay rent (as Scott mentions above). He should not affiliate himself with a gang (highly unlikely, but still, saying it for others who might come along to read this). He should not borrow anything from anyone until he gets to know them very very well, nor should he lend anything to anyone.

If he follows the above, his time will be boredom and frustration, with no physical issues.

My Dad had not one single problem with physical violence. He was 71 when he was arrested and transferred through Coffee Creek. He turned 72 about a month after going to OSCI. He spent 3 years at OSCI before the lung cancer got him transferred to the Pen's infirmary. He NEVER ONCE had a physical altercation or even the threat of one.

Two of his friends who are still at OSCI are also older, one in his 70's, another in his late 50's. Both say they get a lot of derogatory 'cat calls' aimed at them, and both say they've never once been in a situation where the threat of violence was directed at them. My Dad's friend in Snake River is in his 30's, he reports the same thing - a lot of name calling, no physical violence. My Dad's friend who is now in Santiam reports that his time, from Snake to Two Rivers to OSCI to Santiam, he never had anything more than words assault him. He's done 18 years and is about to turn 35 - so he went in as a young buck, and the young ones are the ones most likely to have problems.

It's generally frowned upon to beat up someone who is "elderly" (and when you're 24, being in your 70's makes you "elderly"). It actually lowers an inmate's standing with other inmates.

Think on this: my Dad was on blood thinners. One sucker punch and he could have bled out internally. Instead, he died of lung cancer.

If your brother keeps himself on reasonably decent behavior, doesn't brag about his crimes or seek attention, doesn't parade about or complain about his sentence (because really, a person sentenced to life without parole isn't going to give any sympathy to someone with 'only' 7 years)... he'll be fine. He'll dislike it, he'll adjust, he might even make some friends like my Dad did.

He is not going to be happy, but it is highly unlikely that he will be harmed physically. Most fights involve either rival gangs or unpaid debts (gambling or otherwise). If he stays away from gangs and borrowing/lending/gambling, he'll be as fine as a person can be who enters the system.
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  #38  
Old 04-03-2018, 09:06 AM
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Ginger, thank you so much for your patience with me as I try to absorb all this. I have my own medical issues and unfortunately it takes me longer at my age to remember things. So I truly thank you for your kindness to me and your direction.

I reread everything both you and Scott said and am glad I did. I am going to have my granddaughter help me print it out when she gets off work today so I can find it easier when I need to re-read it. it will help my brother, too, if he follows the advice.

Am I allowed to send my brother a copy of what you and Scott wrote? Is that permissible?
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  #39  
Old 04-04-2018, 05:46 AM
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It is permissible to send information to inmates. In fact, from what I've overheard from people who work at the prison, it's appreciated by the staff and is neutral to the inmates.

Why would the staff appreciate it? For a moment, consider that the staff are not the enemies. They are regular people who go to work and come home and grocery shop and have to do laundry just like the rest of us. Except that in their line of work, a "good day" is one where nothing happens. A "bad day" could end in bodily harm or death. A poor day is one in which they have to pull out their pepper spray (guards on the ground in Oregon prisons do not carry firearms, they carry police-grade mace, and it's dyed hunter orange - not so they can figure out who they sprayed, but so that they can clean it all back up again before someone dies of an asthma attack and so they can get it back out of the clothing again).

So if you send information to your brother/loved one, and that information keeps the peace inside the fence, the staff is happy with that. A boring day is a good day for them.

So feel free to print out as much as you want. What I've reported here is what I've gleaned from the guys and from an interview I had with my Dad once when someone else his age was entering and the other man's children were terrified. (The other man is doing fine too, but credits my Dad and I with keeping him safe. I would disagree - we can offer information, but if they don't listen... )

Try not to include anything that points back to another person who is still inside though. Don't want to make life more difficult for anyone else.
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  #40  
Old 04-04-2018, 05:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexgirl View Post
If you are a SO you try to hide it, but fact is your cellie is likely to ask you and then you are asked to move by count like Scott said or some just "handle" it out of what it is.. My man came out of the hole and said I'll be out unless of course I get celled with a freak meaning he'd go right back to the hole. Just the standard.
But thats him choosing that, him choosing that lifestyle and acting like gang members or opressors in there not someone who wants to do their time or even a neutral inmate. Id he wasnt part of the problem, he wouldnt even say thwt or ask care about the next man on their paperwork. If he wanted to be out early or just do his time or mind his business it would be in his best interest not to even ask and out pressure on himself or let others pressure him into attacking anyone. Its like me, if they out my worst enemy or someone whos tole from me with me or even in the real world i had roomates and trash people steal from me or rip me off or treat me like crap and i never responded with violence except when i was attacked twice and hit first and both times i ended up oaying dearly for even that.
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  #41  
Old 04-05-2018, 11:55 AM
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Of you pay rent make sure your paying it to the right people that can protect you. Some people say they can protect but won’t be able too. There are those in the Oregon system that you can pay rent to and be protected enough to walk the yard and not be bothered. You have to make sure your paying to the right people
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Old 04-05-2018, 02:41 PM
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I think it’s confusing because there’s no single answer as to how to handle yourself, and it will depend very much on your friend’s personality as to how to navigate his time there. A lot of good information has been posted, and my experience was in the Federal system, so I can't add much here in specifics of the Oregon system. Becoming informed about how things “work” (like what’s been shared here!) is the best way for your friend to prepare for the experience. The more informed he can be when walking in the door, the better he’ll be able to manage his experience there. The great example shared about the fellow telling the person to go ask the guard about paying may have worked for his Dad, but may not work for your friend. It’s true that the other inmates will find out sooner or later what your friend’s charges are, but it’s not a good idea to go announcing it either. He’ll just have to decide on an approach that is going to work for him. The best advice I can give has already been shared - be sincerely respectful of everyone, keep as low a profile as possible to get through the “new guy” phase, find a way to be productive with your time (might take a while) and be helpful to other inmates within limits, be professional but not friendly to guards - and never be tempted to snitch out on someone, period.

It’s going to be a challenging experience for your friend, but one he CAN AND WILL get through, just like thousands of others have. You just need to hang on to your faith, your self respect, and a sense of humor through it all. Best of luck - tough, but not the end of the world by any measure.
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  #43  
Old 04-06-2018, 06:32 PM
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Ok half of what i read on hear says you dont ask people what there crime is the other half say your crime papers are like a passport that you flash around. So you can avoid SO association. Which is it? I am so confused.
Im in Oregon and promise you he will be asked to show his papers in Oregon. elder and child abuse they vet out as well not just SO’s.
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Old 10-25-2018, 08:51 AM
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Im in Oregon and promise you he will be asked to show his papers in Oregon. elder and child abuse they vet out as well not just SO’s.
What does vet out mean? I'm curious if someone is not a sexual offender, but has charges linked to child abuse will inmates take any consideration to the actual facts of the case if you show complete paperwork or is it just cut and dry and your pinned as a bad person. Like for a charge of criminal mistreatment 1 where it could be so broad as to the circumstances, can you show paperwork on exactly what actually happened or is that a bad idea or are other inmates not willing to look at that?
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Old 10-26-2018, 05:24 AM
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"vet out" means the inmates decide how bad your offenses are. In some Oregon prisons, it's normal for inmates to ask to see papers, others don't ask. Depends on the prison and its unique culture.

Every inmate is required to wear a badge. The badge has the persons picture and name, and lists the crimes they were convicted of.

As for how bad crimes against children are: generally speaking, crimes against children are considered bad ones. Sex offenses are the worst. Attempting to 'explain away' the crimes will be seen as an attempt to deny that their crime wasn't any big deal. There's a saying inside, "If you're man enough to do the crime, be man enough to do the time." So it's not a good idea to try to minimize the crime.

That said, while they may not be voted Mr Congeniality, and may take some verbal guff from other inmates, it's pretty rare in Oregon prisons for there to be physical assaults on other inmates. Getting insults etc hurled at a person? Yeah. But unless the crime is truly heinous, usually verbal assault is the worst they will endure. Not that being called names on a regular basis is any fun, and it can do psychological damage, but it's not physical harm.

Also, generally, the more one tries to minimize or explain away one's crimes, the lower they'll fall on the social hierarchy. It's best to keep one's mouth closed about one's crimes. Also, any additional information divulged inside can lead to further prosecution should someone report items that the inmate was not originally charged with. Again, best to be quiet about it.
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Old 10-30-2018, 01:14 PM
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I was in the Oregon prison system as a sex offender from 1994 to 2003 and I can say that it was a hard time... BTW, I went back to prison from 2008 to 2010 at CRCI, but this time with clean paperwork. It was a hundred times easier - like being in summer camp.
Truth be told.

I heard the same sentiment from sex offenders who had done time before with "clean" paperwork versus doing time with "dirty" paperwork.

Being in state prison, so long as you're not a sex offender, really is like being in summer camp in many ways. Everyone leaves you alone. No one bothers you. It was easy time.
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