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  #1  
Old 01-23-2019, 09:22 AM
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Default Inmates Not Wanting to be Released From Behind Bars

Inmates Not Wanting to be Released From Behind Bars

STARKVILLE, Miss. (WCBI)- "Typically getting released from behind bars can serve as a new beginning for most inmates.

They’re eager to be released, eager to leave the barbed wire fences and the cell behind, and re-enter society.

However, for some inmates that’s not always the case.

“We like to refer to those as prisonazation,” said Steven Woodruff, a criminal investigator for the 16th Judicial District Attorney’s Office. “They have anxiety about returning to the free world and their normal habits, daily routine, it’s what they become used to in prison.”


https://www.wcbi.com/inmates-not-wan...uAJHAGqaodffUM
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Old 01-23-2019, 09:27 AM
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This is what I call "Shawshanked." In the movie Shawshank Redemption they talk about this and it does totally make sense.

Many have said the fact that Charles Manson grew up in group homes and spent many stints in jail prior to the Tate/Labianca murders he was less worried that he would be caught and go to jail. In fact, some believe that he was MOST comfortable in prison because he knew little else in life.
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:01 AM
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I use this logic when talking to people who don't understand what it takes to transition from incarceration to living in the "free world", think of the movie, "Back to the Future" and ask someone who's spent 10-40 incarcerated to adjust to life outside of prison.
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:48 AM
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This really is sad. My father told me one of his very good friends got quiet a bit of years. At the age of 20 or so. His wife left him with no contact, couldn't contact the child, the only person he had is my dad. When he got released he had nothing out here for him, he couldn't leave the state of CA and we had lived in OR. So he did what he did to get sent back, got a sentence of life.
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Old 01-23-2019, 03:02 PM
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What the article misses is that for many released people, they have nothing to go to. There is a severe lack of housing & employment for anyone with a felony. If the person is still on supervision, there's also fees to be paid. How do you do that with no income? If the incarceration system was honest & told those being released that the future was going to be a tough one for them, many would probably want to stay in the only place that will let them have a place to stay, food & clothing.
Society needs to wake up & start giving people who return to the "real world" a way to succeed. No handouts or free rides, just a chance to earn enough money to pay their expenses & find a place to live.

Hey, news media,quit moaning about it & writing "this is so sad" articles & start asking the people who can make a difference why they won't. Maybe they'll listen if you ask. They sure aren't listening to those of us affected by the problems.
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Old 01-23-2019, 04:32 PM
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Originally Posted by GaReform View Post
What the article misses is that for many released people, they have nothing to go to. There is a severe lack of housing & employment for anyone with a felony. If the person is still on supervision, there's also fees to be paid. How do you do that with no income? If the incarceration system was honest & told those being released that the future was going to be a tough one for them, many would probably want to stay in the only place that will let them have a place to stay, food & clothing.
Society needs to wake up & start giving people who return to the "real world" a way to succeed. No handouts or free rides, just a chance to earn enough money to pay their expenses & find a place to live.

Hey, news media,quit moaning about it & writing "this is so sad" articles & start asking the people who can make a difference why they won't. Maybe they'll listen if you ask. They sure aren't listening to those of us affected by the problems.

"Woodruff believes homelessness, not being able to adapt to society, and getting comfortable being in the same environment for so long are a few reasons why some inmates don’t want to re-enter society.

“They don’t have anybody in the free world,” said Woodruff. “They don’t have any family to help support them, they have no jobs, so it’s kind of like an insurance policy. When they’re in prison they’ve got their meals taken care of, they got their healthcare taken care of, they got a place to sleep, it’s warm or it’s cool in the summer, it’s a sense of home for them.”


The media via the internet is bringing more attention to prison, reform, and re-entry issues during the past few years than I've seen in a long while.
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Old 01-23-2019, 06:16 PM
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It can seem like being dropped on a new planet, especially for those with no family, support, money or a place to live. I totally understand why for some folks, prison is the only life they know.
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Old 01-23-2019, 07:44 PM
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If someone faces extreme barriers to finding employment, housing, and everything else needed upon their return to society, frustration will set in. It is ironic how people who sometimes earned their living illegally try to earn an honest living after release and they face roadblocks.

A small fraction of inmates have what inmates would call the “convict mentality” and prefer to live in prison because they want to be surrounded by people who prefer the “criminal lifestyle” since that is what they take pride and joy in. This is not a giant proportion of inmates but they definitely exist.
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Old 01-23-2019, 09:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Girl22472 View Post
This is what I call "Shawshanked." In the movie Shawshank Redemption they talk about this and it does totally make sense.

Many have said the fact that Charles Manson grew up in group homes and spent many stints in jail prior to the Tate/Labianca murders he was less worried that he would be caught and go to jail. In fact, some believe that he was MOST comfortable in prison because he knew little else in life.

This is true .. one of the things Manson’s prosecutor noted in “Helter Skelter,” his account of the Manson trial, was that Manson had begged prison authorities not to let him out, saying prison was the only home he knew, when he was released not long before forming “The Family” that went on to commit the Tate-Labianca murders, and had authorities heeded his request the victims would likely be alive today. “Helter Skelter” is an excellent read, btw.
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Old 01-24-2019, 08:20 PM
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They should be happy that they free and they can see how the outside world is after a couple of years staying behind the bar.
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Old 01-24-2019, 08:37 PM
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“Helter Skelter” is an excellent read, btw.
Yes, I'm a true crime fanatic and read almost exclusively true crime books (although admittedly my favorite book is fiction... Jane Eyre) and have read Helter Skelter at least twice.
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Old 01-24-2019, 08:42 PM
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They should be happy that they free and they can see how the outside world is after a couple of years staying behind the bar.
Yes, but after decades behind bars in which their knowledge is often "stunted" the world has gone on. Not only do they face issues in jobs, housing... etc. they also face having to learn all the new technology that has been discovered since they were incarcerated. As time goes on and it comes to technology "old" things disappear and things are often exclusively the "new" way.... think about music, phones, computers, the Internet in general (which is how so many places now require for applications for jobs and housing) among other things. Add to this as one gets older it becomes harder and harder to learn new things not to mention when they are much more advanced than they were when someone went in.
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Old 01-24-2019, 09:30 PM
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As someone who was in and out of prison since being a teenage and only out long enough to get married have kids in between being in & out, yes I was more comfortable in especially when my drug usage was out of control, I would go back. It saved my life most likely. I was institutionalized and one time didn't quite make it a week before catching a new case. It wasn't until I started getting older and heard my granddaughter brag about me that I took a hard look and also the fact that my husband passed away in the last 30 days before I was too parole that I made the decision it had to change. A half a lifetime of this thug, drug and prison life had to stop. I made that choice but in all honesty if he had not passed away not sure I'd be here alive or would have finally ended up doing life. You get use to it and the mentality of it. I made something of life once I made that change but it had to come from within me to do it. Been almost 20 years now. I'm the mother, Grandma and great grandma that I should have always been. I also know that I made the choices I made also made me the person I am today. Yes those closest to me suffered and worried about me but they prayed too. I do give him all the Glory too have given me the strength to do it. This is only one person's personal story but have known so many that couldn't or didn't want to make it and take the easy way by staying in that life.
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Old 01-24-2019, 11:02 PM
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My husband has an indeterminate sentence length and half the time he doesn't even want to have his parole hearing because he doesn't think he can make it on the outside. He's been in for 16 years, since he was barely out of his teens.
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Old 01-26-2019, 03:46 PM
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I think and believe that "society" at large does NOT realize how difficult it is for a person who has been incarcerated for a long period of time to make it out here in the real world. Often those long term inmates have no family left or any kind of support system left. What then? I've learned that "society" at large is very unforgiving when it comes to former inmates. Very few want to give them a chance. It sucks, but it is what it is.
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Old 01-27-2019, 10:53 AM
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I think and believe that "society" at large does NOT realize how difficult it is for a person who has been incarcerated for a long period of time to make it out here in the real world. Often those long term inmates have no family left or any kind of support system left. What then? I've learned that "society" at large is very unforgiving when it comes to former inmates. Very few want to give them a chance. It sucks, but it is what it is.

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