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  #26  
Old 01-05-2015, 08:06 PM
LadyBlu LadyBlu is offline
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Thanks for the update. Sorry to hear the boyfriend dumped you. Not surprising he didn't do it in person though, don't take it personally. Happens a lot in all walks of life.
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  #27  
Old 01-07-2015, 09:59 PM
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Thanks for the update. Sorry about the bf, but really - a guy who breaks up by letter when he could do it in person? Not a stellar character. You deserve better.

As to your law school question - there's really no problem getting accepted to law school if you do well on your bachelor's degree (take things that require a lot of reading and writing, or go intellectual property, and get your bachelors in a hard science - then if you pass the patent bar, you don't have to worry about class rank for employment). Get a decent score on the LSAT (like the SAT, but with extra "analytical" sections that's supposed to predict your ability to go to law school - like the GRE for grad school, or the medical school or business school grad school tests).

You'd be advised to apply for the bar you're intending to sit in your first semester of law school. The bar is going to have problems as your character and fitness section will be flagged. Getting flagged is not a death sentence. It just means that you will have extra hoops to jump through, and you will have to show that you have substantively changed and will be an asset to the profession. You will demonstrate your capacity to be an asset to the profession between now and getting permission to sit for the bar exam. You do that by above all, keeping a clean record, all the way through your parole and supervision. You do that by making yourself a good role model to others, contributing to your community, and going to law school with the idea of somehow changing the world, championing the underdog, and righting wrongs, not to make money (though nobody goes to law school with the idea of being poor).

So, this is what you do:
1. keep your record as clean as possible from here out, including institutional record
2. get into therapy (you've made a good start) and stay there for as long as necessary. You may have to talk with a shrink appointed by the bar at some point, so working this stuff out now is essential, and just plain good for you)
3. keep a stellar GPA in high school and college
4. volunteer for organizations that contribute to the community. Pick something that fires you up - animals, poverty, the death penalty, whatever, and start volunteering and keep doing it - it improves your community, gives you a good reference, and allows you to give back
5. major either in a reading and writing intensive subject in college, or in a hard science that will qualify you to sit the patent bar, not just your state bar
6. get a good LSAT score
7. go to an accredited law school
8. submit your character and fitness application for the bar examination in your first semester.

There are plenty of people who came to law AFTER going through the criminal justice system. The major problem is the bar, so once you're in law school, do what they tell you to do to make them ok with approving of your character and fitness to sit. The bar will be the most difficult part, but it is very do-able. The law believes in redemption and second chances, especially for juvenile offenders.

Keep posting and letting us know how you're doing. Glad you're finally getting decent sleep - it always makes it much easier to deal with just about everything.
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  #28  
Old 01-08-2015, 05:05 AM
AngieYuuup AngieYuuup is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yourself View Post
Thanks for the update. Sorry about the bf, but really - a guy who breaks up by letter when he could do it in person? Not a stellar character. You deserve better.

As to your law school question - there's really no problem getting accepted to law school if you do well on your bachelor's degree (take things that require a lot of reading and writing, or go intellectual property, and get your bachelors in a hard science - then if you pass the patent bar, you don't have to worry about class rank for employment). Get a decent score on the LSAT (like the SAT, but with extra "analytical" sections that's supposed to predict your ability to go to law school - like the GRE for grad school, or the medical school or business school grad school tests).

You'd be advised to apply for the bar you're intending to sit in your first semester of law school. The bar is going to have problems as your character and fitness section will be flagged. Getting flagged is not a death sentence. It just means that you will have extra hoops to jump through, and you will have to show that you have substantively changed and will be an asset to the profession. You will demonstrate your capacity to be an asset to the profession between now and getting permission to sit for the bar exam. You do that by above all, keeping a clean record, all the way through your parole and supervision. You do that by making yourself a good role model to others, contributing to your community, and going to law school with the idea of somehow changing the world, championing the underdog, and righting wrongs, not to make money (though nobody goes to law school with the idea of being poor).

So, this is what you do:
1. keep your record as clean as possible from here out, including institutional record
2. get into therapy (you've made a good start) and stay there for as long as necessary. You may have to talk with a shrink appointed by the bar at some point, so working this stuff out now is essential, and just plain good for you)
3. keep a stellar GPA in high school and college
4. volunteer for organizations that contribute to the community. Pick something that fires you up - animals, poverty, the death penalty, whatever, and start volunteering and keep doing it - it improves your community, gives you a good reference, and allows you to give back
5. major either in a reading and writing intensive subject in college, or in a hard science that will qualify you to sit the patent bar, not just your state bar
6. get a good LSAT score
7. go to an accredited law school
8. submit your character and fitness application for the bar examination in your first semester.

There are plenty of people who came to law AFTER going through the criminal justice system. The major problem is the bar, so once you're in law school, do what they tell you to do to make them ok with approving of your character and fitness to sit. The bar will be the most difficult part, but it is very do-able. The law believes in redemption and second chances, especially for juvenile offenders.

Keep posting and letting us know how you're doing. Glad you're finally getting decent sleep - it always makes it much easier to deal with just about everything.
Agreed. Great response.
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  #29  
Old 01-08-2015, 04:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yourself View Post
Thanks for the update. Sorry about the bf, but really - a guy who breaks up by letter when he could do it in person? Not a stellar character. You deserve better.

As to your law school question - there's really no problem getting accepted to law school if you do well on your bachelor's degree (take things that require a lot of reading and writing, or go intellectual property, and get your bachelors in a hard science - then if you pass the patent bar, you don't have to worry about class rank for employment). Get a decent score on the LSAT (like the SAT, but with extra "analytical" sections that's supposed to predict your ability to go to law school - like the GRE for grad school, or the medical school or business school grad school tests).

You'd be advised to apply for the bar you're intending to sit in your first semester of law school. The bar is going to have problems as your character and fitness section will be flagged. Getting flagged is not a death sentence. It just means that you will have extra hoops to jump through, and you will have to show that you have substantively changed and will be an asset to the profession. You will demonstrate your capacity to be an asset to the profession between now and getting permission to sit for the bar exam. You do that by above all, keeping a clean record, all the way through your parole and supervision. You do that by making yourself a good role model to others, contributing to your community, and going to law school with the idea of somehow changing the world, championing the underdog, and righting wrongs, not to make money (though nobody goes to law school with the idea of being poor).

So, this is what you do:
1. keep your record as clean as possible from here out, including institutional record
2. get into therapy (you've made a good start) and stay there for as long as necessary. You may have to talk with a shrink appointed by the bar at some point, so working this stuff out now is essential, and just plain good for you)
3. keep a stellar GPA in high school and college
4. volunteer for organizations that contribute to the community. Pick something that fires you up - animals, poverty, the death penalty, whatever, and start volunteering and keep doing it - it improves your community, gives you a good reference, and allows you to give back
5. major either in a reading and writing intensive subject in college, or in a hard science that will qualify you to sit the patent bar, not just your state bar
6. get a good LSAT score
7. go to an accredited law school
8. submit your character and fitness application for the bar examination in your first semester.

There are plenty of people who came to law AFTER going through the criminal justice system. The major problem is the bar, so once you're in law school, do what they tell you to do to make them ok with approving of your character and fitness to sit. The bar will be the most difficult part, but it is very do-able. The law believes in redemption and second chances, especially for juvenile offenders.

Keep posting and letting us know how you're doing. Glad you're finally getting decent sleep - it always makes it much easier to deal with just about everything.
Thank you so much for replying and for all your advice! I feel relieved knowing that I might still have a chance at being a lawyer.

Didn't expect to have any new updates worth reporting, but last night the craziest thing happened. I arrived back at the center with a headache, so after dinner I passed on hanging out in the common area playing cards and instead went straight to my cell. It turned out to be a really smart move on my part. I was curled up on my bunk when I heard an uproar from beyond my door. I got up and looked out the small window and saw two of my pod-mates trying to pound a third girl into hamburger.

I have no idea what they were fighting about. The two aggressors were taken from our pod and moved to a more secure area of the facility. One of the nurses was summoned to make sure their victim didn't need to be transported to the hospital. I'm surprised she didn't have a concussion, but luckily she wasn't hurt that bad. I can't say I'm friends with her or any of the other girls for that matter, but I felt so bad for her.

This would happen just as I was starting to feel less paranoid for my safety. Granted, the two were taken off the pod, so maybe I'm overreacting.

I gotta run; need to finish my homework. Thanks for listening!
  #30  
Old 01-08-2015, 06:40 PM
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Stuff happens, but usually for a reason. I'm glad the aggressors were moved, and the victim wasn't seriously hurt. It's never a bad idea to be careful, and aware of your surroundings. It's not being paranoid, it's the smart thing to do.
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  #31  
Old 01-09-2015, 12:28 AM
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I stumbled across this thread and I need to tell you DB, I am so impressed with the way you have handled yourself throughout, what must be such a difficult and scary time in your life. I am in awe of your maturity.

I have nothing in common with your situation at all. I am a 32 year old man who is going to federal prison at the end of the month for 5 years on a drug charge. But I have a 2 yr old little girl. And I can only hope that if she is ever found in a tough spot like you, that she handles it with the same compassion and maturity as you. Your parents must be proud of the young woman that you are.

I wish you success in the future.

"The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall."
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
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  #32  
Old 01-12-2015, 04:13 PM
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I stumbled across this thread and I need to tell you DB, I am so impressed with the way you have handled yourself throughout, what must be such a difficult and scary time in your life. I am in awe of your maturity.

I have nothing in common with your situation at all. I am a 32 year old man who is going to federal prison at the end of the month for 5 years on a drug charge. But I have a 2 yr old little girl. And I can only hope that if she is ever found in a tough spot like you, that she handles it with the same compassion and maturity as you. Your parents must be proud of the young woman that you are.

I wish you success in the future.

"The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall."
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
Thank you.

I was raised to believe that itís not enough to say youíre sorry, you have to demonstrate it. For me, that meant not begging for leniency, but instead apologizing and letting the chips fall where they may. Thatís the most I can do for now. I have many months to go before Iíll be free to do more than go to school and come home immediately afterward before heading back to the detention center. But once Iíve finished my time, I definitely want to help educate others in some way so they hopefully wonít make the same bad decision I made. I also want to visit my victimís grave to pay my respects and apologize. I donít know whether I really believe the dead can hear us or not, but I hope they can.

Iím sorry that you and your daughter will soon be separated. I know how much I miss being able to see my extended family, especially my little cousin. I wish you the best too and hope youíll be together again soon.
  #33  
Old 01-12-2015, 08:03 PM
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I think that apologizing to the family as you did, and then later going to the gravesite is a good idea. I talk to my loved ones who have passed away quite frequently. It helps me out, at the very least, even if they can't hear me.

I saw your prior post about going to law school and becoming a lawyer. Great aspirations. You will be able to help out many people throughout your life that way. I am finishing my paralegal degree, will get a BS in the summer, and will be certified hopefully by next fall as a professional paralegal. There are many ways you can contribute in the future.
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  #34  
Old 01-20-2015, 04:30 PM
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I think that apologizing to the family as you did, and then later going to the gravesite is a good idea. I talk to my loved ones who have passed away quite frequently. It helps me out, at the very least, even if they can't hear me.

I saw your prior post about going to law school and becoming a lawyer. Great aspirations. You will be able to help out many people throughout your life that way. I am finishing my paralegal degree, will get a BS in the summer, and will be certified hopefully by next fall as a professional paralegal. There are many ways you can contribute in the future.
If you don't mind my asking, what made you settle on a paralegal degree? Just curious. Good luck with your certification!

I'm sorry for not posting more before now, everyone. I had an insane amount of homework to deal with before the weekend started.

I had another session with the counselor on Saturday. I know I've only had two sessions with him, so maybe this is rushing to judgment, but I'm beginning to worry that this guy is a quack. I'm sorry, but anytime the better part of an hour is spent on learning-to-focus-on-your-breathing exercises, you can't help but wonder.

My sis paid me an unexpected visit on Monday. Her classes were cancelled on account of MLK Day, so she decided to come up and see me. I think I must have the best big sister in the world. That's three times she's been to visit in a little more than a month.

Speaking of visitors, one of my friends told me today that she tried to visit over the weekend, but was denied since she's not a parent or sibling. She thought it was like in the movies, that anyone can show up and visit anybody. I would've laughed if it weren't for the fact that maybe it's a good thing she doesn't know more about how this works. Some things you probably shouldn't have to learn, y'know?

Finally, on Saturday night a girl I know from school was admitted. She showed up around 1 am, so I was asleep and didn't see or talk to her until Sunday morning. She looked sick, so I figured alcohol must have been involved. It was. She said she was at a party when the cops showed up. She tried to run since she plays soccer and drinking can get you thrown off the team. In the end, she was tackled by an officer and is now facing charges of underage drinking and resisting arrest.

Of course, she asked me why I'm here. Not everyone at school knows about what happened, so I told her. I'm not sure, but I think it helped her to calm down knowing there's someone in even worse trouble than she. She was definitely freaked out to be in jail. That's for sure.

She had to remain detained through Monday because of the holiday. She had her detention hearing this morning. I don't know yet if she was released or not. I'll find out for sure when I return shortly. She probably was, considering I was sent home on house arrest. I hope she got to go home. She's never been in trouble before, so hopefully the judge took that into account.

Sorry, I have to go. I need to start getting ready to go back. Hope everyone had a good weekend!
  #35  
Old 01-20-2015, 10:52 PM
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Don't knock breathing exercises - it's a great way to deal with stress. Still, if the therapist doesn't jibe with you, move on to a different therapist if at all possible. You're going to find that a lot of incarceration related therapy is related to impulse control - feel your feelings, but don't act on them, don't let them carry you away into trouble. This is one of the reasons that breathing exercises are taught. Take what you can from them, apply them when relevant, and leave the rest. Good breathing techniques and centering/grounding techniques work wonders when stressed. So, when you don't know the answer to a question on the bar, and you get that sudden surge of, "oh, crap, I'm dead" adrenaline, you can stop, go back to the question, and puzzle out what you do know so the whole thing isn't the wash it'd be if you ran from the entire question, or worse, let the whole, "oh, crap" adrenaline color the rest of your test.

Glad you're reaching out to help others, and being honest about your reason for being there. Best to be honest than make up stories at this juncture. It'll help you with these sorts of admissions in situations and with people when it's much harder. But really - good on you for helping out a classmate in need, providing them with what would have been really helpful for you your first few days inside.

Cool about your sister. Sounds like she's a keeper.

Keep up the good work, and thanks for the update.
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  #36  
Old 01-21-2015, 06:27 AM
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Like yourself said, don't be too quick to knock the breathing techniques! Honestly, not too long ago I'd probably feel the same ab it as you... But I've actually looked more into breathing techniques and stuff here recently & I think I wasn't a fan bc I honestly just didn't really understand what they were all about. I am very grateful now for what I've learned about it all! I'd encourage you to do a little googling so that you can have a better understanding for yourself. Or if you'd like, I can send you a few links to some of the material that helped me better understand it all! Let me know!

Thanks for the update girl! Your sister is def the best! I know you are cherishing every visit you are able to have! all and all sounds like things are going well... Other than the fight from the other day... Thankfully you were far out of harms way when it happened!!
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  #37  
Old 01-21-2015, 09:13 PM
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If you don't mind my asking, what made you settle on a paralegal degree?
I've always been a good support and research type of person, not necessarily a frontlines person, so a paralegal degree makes sense for me, where I didn't have to worry about building a clientele, etc.
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  #38  
Old 01-21-2015, 09:28 PM
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A Legal Librarian is good too if you are a behind the scenes person.
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  #39  
Old 01-23-2015, 04:19 PM
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I guess I'm not ready to give up on the counselor yet. I don't know...maybe I am being too dismissive where the breathing exercises are concerned. JsLsButterfly, could you send me those links you mentioned? I'd like to give them a look.

Just wanted to give ya'll a quick update regarding the girl from my school before I head in for the weekend. From now on, I'll be referring to her as "M," as I'm sure she wouldn't want me to use her real name on here. Anyway, when I arrived back on the pod Tuesday night, there she was. The judge had decided to detain her until her next hearing. She was really upset, as you can imagine. It was obvious she'd been crying. I tried to get her to tell me what'd happened, but she didn't want to talk about it. I spent the rest of the evening by her side, doing my best to provide emotional support.

Yesterday, while I was at school, she received isolation for mouthing off to one of the DOs. This makes me wonder if she said something to the judge that was either disrespectful or else could be interpreted that way. Whether she said anything or not, I hope she clues in to the fact that the officers here aren't interested in anyone's opinion and that you're better off just doing whatever they say without commentary. Things definitely go a lot smoother for you when you make their jobs go smoother, that much I know.

I know this sounds mean, but I'm actually kinda glad she'll be here for the next couple weeks. While I haven't had any problems with anyone, I know the others aren't exactly happy that I'm allowed to leave for school while they're stuck inside. It'll be a nice change, having someone here who doesn't make me nervous. I hope that doesn't sound horrible.

I gotta run. I'll try and post again once the weekend's over!
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Old 01-23-2015, 04:48 PM
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I bet if you're as decent to the others in there as you are here people will soon figure out, for now, you're just like everybody else.

You got into trouble and you're paying the price.
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Old 01-24-2015, 03:23 PM
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Meh, your first inclination was that you wanted your friend out. She couldn't be out, so staying with you is a good thing.

Listen, one of the things that happens with kids is that they are not allowed to go home if 1. the home environment isn't a good place, or 2. the parents aren't willing to take the kid (they are asked if they'll take the child, and be responsible for the child and control the child, and while teens don't like to be considered children, that's what the court sees them as, so excuse the use of the term. Personally, the needs of people your age are very different than the needs of younger kids, who we normally think of as children, the child, etc). Now, I'm just positing this because I've seen it a few times before. You'd know if number 1 was the reason, and she'd most likely talk about number 1. But, number 2 can happen when parents just have no clue how to deal with a teen, or they feel the teen needs tough love. It's really hard for anybody to hear, "no, I will not take my kid, I will not be responsible" or worse, "no, I will not take my kid, she belongs in detention". It will cause most people, especially teens in crisis, to act out. Glad she's experiencing some consequences, but if you want to help her, she's going to have to talk about it, and what the court and her parents want to see from her.

Anyway, don't beat yourself up for wanting a friend close to you. Nothing wrong with that, especially if she can't be with her family at the moment. I'd be aware that she's going to act out until she decides to at least play the game without comment. you can help her accept that this isn't because people hate her, but because they want the best for her. That best means that they may over-react to smaller things. Encourage her to do AA or other such offerings inside, but really, the best thing you can do for her as a friend is to get her to talk. It's way too easy for her to say, "well, if they want me to be a prisoner, I'll be a prisoner" and then get into some of the stuff you've been avoiding. If you see her going in that direction, you'll be faced with a hard choice - trying to help her, and trying to stay out of trouble. This is just a head's up - think about stuff first, anticipate some of the potential trouble, and you'll be able to respond thoughtfully, and from a point of care and concern, rather than reflexively and impulsively.

Keep doing good work.
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Old 01-24-2015, 03:27 PM
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A Legal Librarian is good too if you are a behind the scenes person.
Especially if the paralegal courses aren't satisfying enough. A good Law Librarian has both a JD (law degree) and a MLS (Masters in Library Sciences), thought frequently you can get away with lower than a JD, though that MLS seems pretty standard for decent jobs, especially as law firms move away from books and into computer only research.

JD + MLS, and you can work at a law school, with the upper courts, and have a ton of job security with great pay and benefits. Law Librarian is shackled to the library, not a particular lawyer, but when lawyers come in, or professors, they can and do aid with their research.
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  #43  
Old 01-24-2015, 04:03 PM
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I've met a few Legal Librarians that work for mega firms and their pay is dramatically higher, but they also have more of the stress and pressure big firms can cause.

Also, one or two I know were de barred, and turned to the research side as a way to stay in the legal world. Not what they'd planned, but I know all too well how a few stupid decisions can derail a career.

I think that as the years go by if the OP is still interested in the world of law - go for it!

Law school isn't easy, but neither is detention - both can be done!
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Old 01-25-2015, 08:09 AM
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DB.
It sounds like your doing pretty good. Im sorry about your schoolmate and her troubles.
Just be careful that you stay out of any trouble she may get into by talking back.
Hopefully she will snap out of it soon.

Its sort of funny about your friend who tried to visit. yeah, its not like tv thats for sure.
It was nice of her to try tho.
Now you SISTER?
what a gem. You are lucky to have such a good sister.
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  #45  
Old 01-25-2015, 11:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sidewalker View Post
DB.
It sounds like your doing pretty good. Im sorry about your schoolmate and her troubles.
Just be careful that you stay out of any trouble she may get into by talking back.
Hopefully she will snap out of it soon.

Its sort of funny about your friend who tried to visit. yeah, its not like tv thats for sure.
It was nice of her to try tho.
Now you SISTER?
what a gem. You are lucky to have such a good sister.
I agree with sidewalker don't let any issues your friend have get you into trouble. It won't be a good outcome and may end up adding more time to your sentence. I'm also glad you have a sister that supports you and stands by you. Family means everything

Last edited by flracer; 01-25-2015 at 11:24 PM.. Reason: Misspell
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  #46  
Old 01-29-2015, 04:29 PM
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Hey everyone! Thank you all for the advice and encouragement. My apologies for not posting sooner. Between the weekend and the fact that our internet was out until yesterday, it's been impossible to get online.

Yourself: If you don't mind my asking, do you specialize in criminal law? Your second to last post had me wondering. Lately I've been thinking that, if I'm able to get into law school and pass the bar and everything, I might go into criminal law as a defense attorney. I figure there's nothing like having been in this situation yourself to help you relate to your clients. Ideally, I think I'd like to work for a group like the Innocence Project, helping to free people who've been wrongly convicted.

When I arrived back on the pod last night, M was in isolation again. She was there until bedtime and I didn't get a chance to ask her about it this morning. Hopefully, I'll get the full story tonight. All I know is this one girl (who's in for robbing a gas station) told me, "Your friend is [enter expletive here] crazy."

She still won't talk about what happened in court. Yourself, I think you might be right about her parents possibly saying they didn't want to take her home. I don't know why it would still be such a touchy subject with her.

There's so much more to say, but I really have to go. Thank you all for listening. Hope to be posting again soon!
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Old 01-30-2015, 01:38 AM
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Rejection is a hard thing to experience from anybody, especially a parent. If she's feeling it deeply, then she's been wounded. Look at it from your experience - your parents and sister would do just about anything to get you out of detention, and probably got you out as quickly as they could after your arrest, right? Imagine if upon seeing them, when you're confused and hurting and scared about what's going to happen, they turned their backs on you, saying that they would not take you home. It's a tough one.

In IL, MA, and IA, there are no "specialties" like you think about them in medicine. I'm a solo practitioner, ham and egger who does primarily trial level criminal and quasi criminal law - juvenile delinquency would be quasi criminal since you're adjudicated "delinquent". Quasis include probation/parole revocation, mental health, civil commitment of sex offenders, seizures of property, and even what's colloquially referred to as "father's day". It's actually the day every month when people who have to face the judge for failure to pay child support get to appear. Basically, if your liberty interest is at stake, I'm interested in the work. I've handled everything from status related smoking through murder, though I refused to join the death bar when IL had the death penalty, so I've never done a death penalty case. I just can't do those things.

If you're interested in the appellate level - where most Innocence Projects are located, you might want to read up on a variety of things. Justice Stevens, retired, recently gave a lecture at a Florida law school that said that Texas executed an innocent man when they executed Carlos De Luna. I'd look at that case, though I'd be ready to be very pissed at how grossly the system let that man down. In Texas, David Dow works a ton of death penalty appeals, both people he believes are totally innocent of the crimes as well as people who are definitely guilty, and everything in between. He's written some decent books on how the death penalty is applied in Texas. Northwestern University's journalism department was largely responsible for the abolition of the death penalty through the exposure of innocent men on death row. Reading up on that program would be a good thing. So would the movie/play The Exonerated. Scott Turrow wrote a book about his experiences on the Illinois commission to revamp the death penalty, and that's an interesting look into the process of making laws. Fortunately, the law they came up with didn't last long, and Governor Rod got rid of the death penalty altogether before he retired to Club Fed with former Gov. Ryan.

Depending on where you are, there may be an Innocence Project local to you. When you have the ability, you can look at volunteer there - there's always plenty of work that's non-legal to do. Might be taking out the garbage, or making sure documents are shredded, or helping to coordinate deposition schedules, or finding and hiring PIs, or just getting coffee for an office full of people who can't leave their computers because of a deadline, but it's good work, and furthers your interest. And, whether you get into law or journalism or astrophysics, it'll look good on your college application. Further, volunteer work can lead to paid employment, so I'd encourage you to do your research in your state, and then volunteer.
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  #48  
Old 01-30-2015, 04:18 PM
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Yourself:

In my last post, I meant to say "I don't know why it would still be a touchy subject with her otherwise." Sorry if there was any confusion. If her parents really did refuse to take her home, I totally get that she's hurting badly. Her hearing is coming up next week. I'm hoping she'll get to go home then with credit for time served. With all the trouble she's been getting into, I can't be sure that she will. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for her though.

Turns out she got into a fight with another girl who was trying to make her move out of her seat while she was playing cards. Nobody was hurt, luckily. I'm assuming that's why they didn't move her off the pod.

Thank you so much for all the information in your last post. I did a search for the nearest Innocence Project. Turns out it's in New Orleans. Wish there was one closer. Maybe if I attend college nearby, I'll be able to volunteer then.

By Justice Stevens, you mean John Paul Stevens, correct? I want to find his lecture online, assuming it was recorded.

You mentioned handling a case involving underage smoking. They can actually summon you to court for that? I thought they just issued citations for that sort of thing. I don't smoke and none of my friends (far as I know) have ever been busted for smoking, so this is new to me.

Once again, there's so much I'd like to say/ask, but I have to get going. Thanks you for replying!
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Old 01-30-2015, 11:47 PM
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The media citation of Stevens' speech: http://www.law.columbia.edu/media_in...tevens-liebman

the lecture:
http://mediasite.video.ufl.edu/Media...de47cdcefb071d



http://www.theatlantic.com/national/...nt-man/257106/

law review article Stevens cited:
http://www3.law.columbia.edu/hrlr/

The Atlantic article also cites to The wrong Carlos .net, which is an interesting site.
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Old 01-30-2015, 11:50 PM
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If there's no way to participate in an Innocence Project program atm, you can always go Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, and even your state's chapter of the ACLU. Advocacy and change, pushing petitions to get signatures, creating awareness - all good. Some will even help you organize a chapter at your high school, when that become reasonable.
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