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  #1  
Old 08-16-2018, 06:36 PM
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Default Kentucky official urging lawmakers to slow states soaring prison population

Kentucky official urging lawmakers to slow state's soaring prison population

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Kentucky's prisons and the county jails that also house state inmates are essentially full.

Justice and Public Safety Secretary John Tilley said recreational space has been filled and inmates have double-bunked, but it still isn't enough.

"We have no capacity left," he said. "We have done everything that continue to keep us, at least as best as we can, accredited."

The next step, Tilley said, is to begin releasing some lower-level, non-violent offenders.

Read the entire article HERE.

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Old 08-16-2018, 08:18 PM
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At some point, new facilities need to be built. People clamor for non-custodial options but then the people ON probation whine and snivel that they were set up to fail. While they were not set up, you STILL have a revocation to contend with and you HAVE to put them somewhere.

Then there is the camp that cries "treatment" except that we all know that treatment only works when the individual is willing to ACCEPT the treatment. Most don't want it because that incessant testing and requirement to go to meetings gets in the way of getting high, which then results in probation (see paragraph 1).

If you start decriminalizing offenses or reducing them to misdemeanors, then you get California (with its increasing property crime rate).

At some point in time, it is essential to simply admit that some people have forfeited their right to live in a free society and NEED to be locked up to protect law-abiding people from their criminal ways.
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Old 10-17-2018, 07:36 AM
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Ok so I usually sit by and just read things and absorb what is being said. And I mean no disrespect to anyone. But I can tell you first hand as a person who has worked on the inside of a prison and as a spouse of someone who is incarcerated. There is nothing on the inside to help or reform people. They lock them up and keep them in the DOC day care and when it is time they release them to the streets. How is someone supose to reform if they aren't given the tools to do so.
In Kentucky we have over crowding and it is only getting worse due to the meth and heroin epidemic we are experiencing. Both of these drugs change the brain chemistry of a user. They become people you wouldn't recognize. Addicting is a horrible disease, put it is just that a disease and until we recognize that nothing will change. Yes I get that people make choices and get them selves into a bad spot. But locking them up in places that have more drugs then the street isn't the answer. Treatment is the answer and I mean real treatment. Not locking them up so they are forced to detox without the proper supervision. They need therapy and medically assisted rehab. If all you ever give people are nails then all they know is the hammer.
I am a educated professional and I see all this first hand. There is no treatment in jail and as far as the SAP program its bullshit. Its still prison and it sets them up to fail.
People we have problems in this state and nothing will change until we the citizens put pressure on lawmakers to change our laws. One person by themselves can't move a mountain but a whole group can make it move. Prison sentence punish the offender but it also punishes the families of the inmate. We shoulder a lot of the financial stuff by putting money on their books so they can eat something decent. Lets face it the stuff they serve them isn't fit to eat and a lot of it is marked "not for human consumption" I know this because I have seem it. They get shitty medical care that we pay for with our taxes and money we put on their books. We the families pay for their clothes, shoes, underwear,socks,TV,Music and anything else they may need on the inside. We can have food payed for and delivered. We pay for the phone calls they make so we can have contact with them. We pay for things to eat and drink when we visit them. We drive for miles just to see them. So that is our punishment for something we didn't have a part in. So No, No one is disposable we need real rehab and therapy for these men and women who are sitting in the jails and prison. So I am sorry if I don't value the opinion of someone who isn't even from the state that this article is written about.
Sorry if I got on a rant there I been saving that one up for a while. But I know how things work on the inside and I also know how it is to be a spouse on the outside.
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  #4  
Old 12-12-2018, 06:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Lady Grey 43 View Post
Ok so I usually sit by and just read things and absorb what is being said. And I mean no disrespect to anyone. But I can tell you first hand as a person who has worked on the inside of a prison and as a spouse of someone who is incarcerated. There is nothing on the inside to help or reform people. They lock them up and keep them in the DOC day care and when it is time they release them to the streets. How is someone supose to reform if they aren't given the tools to do so.
In Kentucky we have over crowding and it is only getting worse due to the meth and heroin epidemic we are experiencing. Both of these drugs change the brain chemistry of a user. They become people you wouldn't recognize. Addicting is a horrible disease, put it is just that a disease and until we recognize that nothing will change. Yes I get that people make choices and get them selves into a bad spot. But locking them up in places that have more drugs then the street isn't the answer. Treatment is the answer and I mean real treatment. Not locking them up so they are forced to detox without the proper supervision. They need therapy and medically assisted rehab. If all you ever give people are nails then all they know is the hammer.
I am a educated professional and I see all this first hand. There is no treatment in jail and as far as the SAP program its bullshit. Its still prison and it sets them up to fail.
People we have problems in this state and nothing will change until we the citizens put pressure on lawmakers to change our laws. One person by themselves can't move a mountain but a whole group can make it move. Prison sentence punish the offender but it also punishes the families of the inmate. We shoulder a lot of the financial stuff by putting money on their books so they can eat something decent. Lets face it the stuff they serve them isn't fit to eat and a lot of it is marked "not for human consumption" I know this because I have seem it. They get shitty medical care that we pay for with our taxes and money we put on their books. We the families pay for their clothes, shoes, underwear,socks,TV,Music and anything else they may need on the inside. We can have food payed for and delivered. We pay for the phone calls they make so we can have contact with them. We pay for things to eat and drink when we visit them. We drive for miles just to see them. So that is our punishment for something we didn't have a part in. So No, No one is disposable we need real rehab and therapy for these men and women who are sitting in the jails and prison. So I am sorry if I don't value the opinion of someone who isn't even from the state that this article is written about.
Sorry if I got on a rant there I been saving that one up for a while. But I know how things work on the inside and I also know how it is to be a spouse on the outside.
I agree with everything you just said. Some would argue that we should pay for all this. but when they are moved to another facility their personal items sometimes go into storage. That can cause financial hardship to the families. Then there is the argument that it costs the state to house them. If it costs the state $45 a day to house an inmate. The inmates with the lowest level of classification can (and do) work in the public (streets and roads, garbage collection, leaf removal) without a guard. The inmate works 8 hours a day at $7.25 an hour. That's $58 a day. So the inmate has SAVED the state $13 a day. Now, if they work garbage collection, the starting pay is about $15 an hour. So they SAVE the state about $75 a day. Is it any wonder they will keep the low risk inmates that can work in the public as long as they can??? while the higher risk inmates are set free on probation or parole....
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Old 12-12-2018, 01:04 PM
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I agree with everything you just said. Some would argue that we should pay for all this. but when they are moved to another facility their personal items sometimes go into storage. That can cause financial hardship to the families. Then there is the argument that it costs the state to house them. If it costs the state $45 a day to house an inmate. The inmates with the lowest level of classification can (and do) work in the public (streets and roads, garbage collection, leaf removal) without a guard The inmate works 8 hours a day at $7.25 an hour. That's $58 a day. So the inmate has SAVED the state $13 a day. Now, if they work garbage collection, the starting pay is about $15 an hour. So they SAVE the state about $75 a day. Is it any wonder they will keep the low risk inmates that can work in the public as long as they can??? while the higher risk inmates are set free on probation or parole....
Excuse me? My Mr worked in Prison Industries @ KSR a number of years ago, the TOP paying job an inmate could have at that time: He made a whopping $1.05 per hour. However, most prison jobs are paid .60 cents +/- PER DAY, depending on the job. Example, working in the kitchen is the second highest paying job, paying approx 1.25 PER DAY. A friend of mine had a job changing light bulbs @ .25 cents PER DAY.

Low risk inmates who may work out in public areas do have a guard with / watching them. What? You think the CO's just toss 'em the keys to a van and cut 'em loose

I'd be very interested to see a source for your info
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Old 12-13-2018, 06:28 AM
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Excuse me? My Mr worked in Prison Industries @ KSR a number of years ago, the TOP paying job an inmate could have at that time: He made a whopping $1.05 per hour. However, most prison jobs are paid .60 cents +/- PER DAY, depending on the job. Example, working in the kitchen is the second highest paying job, paying approx 1.25 PER DAY. A friend of mine had a job changing light bulbs @ .25 cents PER DAY.

Low risk inmates who may work out in public areas do have a guard with / watching them. What? You think the CO's just toss 'em the keys to a van and cut 'em loose

I'd be very interested to see a source for your info
You're talking about how much it costs the state to pay THEM. I'm talking about how much it costs the state to hire someone from outside to do the job if they weren't able to use the inmates. My son worked with streets and roads, they sent him and other inmates out with an employee of streets and roads --- and no guard.
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Old 12-16-2018, 11:38 AM
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You're talking about how much it costs the state to pay THEM. I'm talking about how much it costs the state to hire someone from outside to do the job if they weren't able to use the inmates. My son worked with streets and roads, they sent him and other inmates out with an employee of streets and roads --- and no guard.



Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're saying. Your son and others who were in DOC custody were allowed on a worksite unsupervised?
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Old 12-20-2018, 03:04 PM
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Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're saying. Your son and others who were in DOC custody were allowed on a worksite unsupervised?
I am saying that yes, they had an employee from streets and roads. but they did not have a guard from the jail.
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Old 01-11-2019, 01:17 PM
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s this playing a role in the outcome of non violent , Class D felony when it comes to sentencing in Louisville?
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Old 01-11-2019, 09:22 PM
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s this playing a role in the outcome of non violent , Class D felony when it comes to sentencing in Louisville?
Hopefully it would be for all, not just in Louisville but so far nothing has been filed before the legislature.
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Old 01-11-2019, 10:54 PM
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I know you're talking about the State of KY and County Prisons, but considering who Kentucky's senior senator is and how he isn't doing anything to help get the shutdown under control and he has that ability to do something, I am not surprised.

And, the prisoners there make more than $1/hour? That's a lot! Federal prisoners only make cents per hour so that's something.

But I agree, the systems everywhere are a mess, but the problem is that they're too big of a mess and I think no one know where the hell to start in any prison system to fix it! Basically you have to scrap the entire thing and start over, but no chance in hell that's happening.
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:15 AM
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I know you're talking about the State of KY and County Prisons, but considering who Kentucky's senior senator is and how he isn't doing anything to help get the shutdown under control and he has that ability to do something, I am not surprised.

And, the prisoners there make more than $1/hour? That's a lot! Federal prisoners only make cents per hour so that's something.

But I agree, the systems everywhere are a mess, but the problem is that they're too big of a mess and I think no one know where the hell to start in any prison system to fix it! Basically you have to scrap the entire thing and start over, but no chance in hell that's happening.

He has nothing to do with how the state runs on a state level so he has no say-so in the way the state prisons run.

That "more than $1/hour" should have said per day, not per hour.
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:26 AM
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He has nothing to do with how the state runs on a state level so he has no say-so in the way the state prisons run.

That "more than $1/hour" should have said per day, not per hour.
I know he has nothing to do with the State prisons, that is implied in my comment, but it's not surprising that is going on there when you look at the kind of people KY is electing to it's offices, both at the state and federal level. Prison reform needs to happen everywhere.

And, even at $1/day that is still more pay than they are getting in Federal Prisons and in many state prisons. My husband's monthly pay is $23.80 in prison and that is one of the highest paying jobs where he is with the exception of if you're a "manager" of some sort, which he is not. His first job there he was making something like $15/month. Some guys $30/month is a ton of money. It's still not enough I agree, and they're overcrowded, and there are problems, and prison reform is probably much easier to start at the state and county level than at the federal level and should.
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:44 AM
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I know you're talking about the State of KY and County Prisons, but considering who Kentucky's senior senator is and how he isn't doing anything to help get the shutdown under control and he has that ability to do something, I am not surprised.
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I know he has nothing to do with the State prisons, that is implied in my comment, but it's not surprising that is going on there when you look at the kind of people KY is electing to it's offices, both at the state and federal level. Prison reform needs to happen everywhere.
I do believe that your perception of and perspective on Kentucky is a tad skewed - and biased - most likely due to your knowledge of Turtle McConnell. However, one bad apple does not define the entire state.
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:47 AM
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I know he has nothing to do with the State prisons, that is implied in my comment, but it's not surprising that is going on there when you look at the kind of people KY is electing to it's offices, both at the state and federal level. Prison reform needs to happen everywhere.

Please. Don't slam my state. At least whoever is elected here doesn't serve prison time after their term.
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Old 01-12-2019, 11:11 AM
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Please. Don't slam my state. At least whoever is elected here doesn't serve prison time after their term.
Are you kidding? I have amazing memories of the state of Kentucky and the USA taking the Cup in 2008!!! So much so one of my companies is named for Valhalla golf course! So I'm definitely NOT slamming the state.

And one correction - some people here don't even get to finish their terms before going to the slammer, deservedly so! Blago is where he belongs. The guy still shows no remorse. Although Rauner isn't accused of any wrondoing, he sure hasn't helped our state either and god knows what Pritzker is going to do. We aren't in good shape, that is for sure, but at least we have great Senators!

But why oh why, is McConnell such a wimp? He sure ran out of town as fast as he could yesterday? He has egg on his face. He needs to get his party together, work with the dems, and pass a bill that will override any presidential veto and put Trump on notice that he can't just do whatever he wants. People are hurting and Trump has no f'ing clue and for him to have the gall to say he knows what it's like? Give me a break! I know off topic. Sorry!
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Old 01-12-2019, 11:14 AM
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Let's get back on topic.

This is a state issue that has absolutely nothing to do with federal anything or anybody.

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Kentucky official urging lawmakers to slow state's soaring prison population

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Kentucky's prisons and the county jails that also house state inmates are essentially full.

Justice and Public Safety Secretary John Tilley said recreational space has been filled and inmates have double-bunked, but it still isn't enough.

"We have no capacity left," he said. "We have done everything that continue to keep us, at least as best as we can, accredited."

The next step, Tilley said, is to begin releasing some lower-level, non-violent offenders.

Read the entire article HERE.

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Old 01-14-2019, 06:29 AM
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"We don't want to be in the prison-building business either," he said. "What we need to be in is in the business of reducing this population, getting people back to work and back to their families and back to clean and sober living." When the people that run these jails withdraw the opportunity to participate in programs, for over a month, in order to retaliate against inmates, they are contributing to the problem of overcrowding. If they withhold the programs until the inmates are released, you could say there was no rehabilitation - just punishment. Would you say that contributes to recidivism?
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