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The War on Drugs - and the results of it A war against drugs, or against families?

View Poll Results: people who get drug and or related cases should get sentenced to?
some kind of rehab to overcome addiction 512 94.29%
go straight to jail - "I have no sympathy for DOPERS!" 31 5.71%
Voters: 543. You may not vote on this poll

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  #26  
Old 03-07-2004, 01:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kamaboko
Clockwork Orange. That's the only way to cure these people.
DO MEAN PRISON OR JAIL>? IF SO, U MUST NOT HAVE EVER BEEN THREW IT (SUBSTANCE ABUSE), AND UR SOOO WRONG. PRISONS AND JAILS DO NOT REHABILITATE OR HELP, IT JUST POST PONES THE TIME THEY MISS USING. JUST LIKE ANY OTHER ADDICTION, A DRUG USER CANNOT JUST STOP. THEY NEED TO LEARN THE STEPS, HOW TO FIGHT THE URGES...WHAT TRIGGERS IT? ETC... A DRUG ADDICT THAT HAS BEEN IN AND OUT 4 THE SAME THING AND NOTHING ELSE ABVIOUSLY NEEDS TREATMENT. A LOCKDOWN REHAB TO LEARN AND GET EDUCATED ON WHAT TO DO. BEEN GOING THREW THIS 4 SIX YEARS..SORRY, JAIL AND PRISON IS NOT THE ANSWERissed:
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Old 03-16-2004, 01:30 AM
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I'm going to recommend that my brother go to drug councelling although he is 5 months clean now. I don't think that forced abstention is the answer.

But these people (my brother included) don't fully realize the aftermath they have left behind with their BS. If my mom was on his "restitution" list, he'd owe her about ten thousand dollars. They definitely need some kind of counseling.

AARGH! Where is the spell checker!!

Kelly
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  #28  
Old 04-18-2004, 05:24 AM
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Most interesting thread. I was just thinking about this yesterday. My stepson stands to receive more time than a neighbor's grandson who shot and killed his mother and stepfather! My stepson was a heroin addict who committed armed robbed in several states (plus ripped off the entire neighborhood). The charges keep on coming and I know that none of this would have happened if not for the heroin. I know jail/prison is saving his life but we as a society have got to do better.
I used to think addicts had to reach rock bottom - that's what I learned years ago. But I've since learned that rock bottom can mean death and who needs that. I've heard Dr. Phil on tv say that forced interventions do in fact work. He had a boy on his show who was forced into rehab that they are following. Not sure of the outcome as we have to stay tuned in order to see what eventually happens to the boy.
I hope someday a scientist will invent something that will give the addict no choice but to quit drugs. I know someone with a device implanted in his arm that's supposed to keep him off heroin but he told me it "only works if you want it to". Drug addiction is a horrible disease that so far seems to be winning. I just think we've got to find a better way to help those who are unable or unwilling to help themselves. I think too that the drugs are masking much deeper problems and we need to get to the root of those problems ... not an easy task.

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  #29  
Old 04-22-2004, 05:35 PM
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Definately put these people in rehab, and get them help. Australian prisons were so overcrowded with people that were caught with drugs, they have a policy now called called the three strikes method.
First, if you are caught, you are made to go to drug and alcohol councelling, that is actually held by the police, and they drill in your head, how bad it is, how bad prison is, and really try and help.
Second offence, you go into drug and alcohol rehab run by community health.
Third time, you get fined, and you have to go to extensive drug and alcohol rehab.
Get caught again, you go to prison.
It has actually worked, and the prison systems arent crowded with people that are addicted to substances, and IF they make it to prison, they do more extensive rehab to cut time off there sentences. The courts arent wasting there time with drug offenders only caught with possession, and the prison isnt overpopulated with people using drugs.
They also have programs for people addicted to substances such as heroine, where they run a methodone programs run through the hospitals, and community health. They can then monitor these people, and councel them while on this program.
Now if you deal drugs, or make drugs thats another matter.........
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  #30  
Old 04-26-2004, 10:34 AM
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Default Progressive Maryland USA

I understand that Maryland recently passed a rule that would send nonviolent drug offenders to rehab vs. jail. Anyone else know anyting about this new rule?
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Old 04-26-2004, 10:50 AM
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My husband got butsted in March. I am so proud to say that since that day he has not touched ANYTHING! I know this to be a fact because his job tests him every week. He has not been to court yet over this thing and he has never been in trouble before. We are terrified he is going to get prison time for a first offense. They set his bond at 75,000 and his cousin { dealer) who got popped for a second time at 35,000. I agree they gotta WANT TO QUIT before it happens. The cousin who hasnt even been to trial for the first time is still using. We dont have anything to do with him anymore. We figured it best that way since if something went down AGAIN, we sure didnt need to be there. My husband is 44 years old and he is scared to death. Maybe this is what is called "SCARED STRAIGHT"
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  #32  
Old 04-26-2004, 01:45 PM
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Bye now I am absolutely positively sure sending a drug addict to jail does not solve anything. In order to solve the problem you must first face the problem head on; not lock a human being up and throw away the key. Thier are Drug Deversion Programs out there, that have been very successful. Like Prop. 36, and Drug Deversion. These are long term programs that take lots of time and effort in order to complete. These Drug Programs can be a very positive stepping stone for an addict, but they will work only if you work them.
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  #33  
Old 06-22-2004, 12:38 AM
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Default Re: Drug Rehab or Prison?

I am not sure what "prison" accomplishes for a drug offense.
Drugs are available in prison ( I think most people know that).
So if someone is going to reform, they are wanting to do so.
If they want to "dry" somone out ...why not do so with a
medical staff to help them? It is long a complex process.
But I don't see the "help" such as what counseling and
support do prisoners get that a drug rehab center (inpatient
or outpatient) can't more adequately provide?
If another crime is involved...well, it has to be judged on
each case. I think we have to try to offer medical
and social alternatives before adding to an already
"troubled" situation by the harshness of a prison enviornment
and the social stigma added to an addiction.
Hitting "bottom" is different for everyone.
To some it's the confrontation ...losing or endanger of
losing a valuable personal relationship, job, ect.
And to some....it's the to "die or not to die".
For the people who did change in a prison or rehab program....
how many times before it was successful and what made
the difference?

Kate

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Originally Posted by joeslilbaby
I know a ton of other things would consider each case different, but drug charges in general are what I am referring to here..
Is prison the answer for the people who get caught up in an addiction?
California has new laws for drug cases to go to rehab's insteed.... what do you think?
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  #34  
Old 06-25-2004, 02:47 PM
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Default The Addict has to decide

The love of my life is serving 4.5 years in a Arizona hellhole for her mistake. This is her second time (1st was 5 years for $40 of herioin). The hardest thing for her is once she quit for a while she got hooked on Methadone which is another trap and according to susan worse than the orginial because they kept trying to up her doses. Then she got in a accident and got hooked on Perscription drugs such as Oxecotton. She's been in since the start of 2003 and since I now live across the country I can only visit 4 times a year. She's been clean since then and what a difference! Her eyes are clear and she is turning back into the beautiful woman she once was. Even the needle tracks are starting to go away. The point is she couldn't quit until she finally hit "rock bottom" and nothing is certain still but we take it one day at a time. Back when we were living together she was using and I didn't call her on it. That won't happen again. I love her and we're getting married and I'll do anything for her that I can, but I'll never overlook the signs again. When she gets out we'll both be attending meetings.
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  #35  
Old 06-27-2004, 06:09 PM
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Ok, I have to say that this is a very hard topic to decide what would be the best way. I know that the ONLY way you will change an addiction is if you really want to. No matter where you go or what you do, you won't change if you don't want to. I was a dope head for 2 years and I went to rehab. I will be honest, the only reason I went there was to get out quicker than the two years they were going to give me. Sure I have not been completely recovered (I still drink and smoke weed) but I am at no means as bad as I was. I don't think they should send everyone to a rehab that gets high, b/c face it-not everyone wants to change AT ALL!!!! But prisons do not rehabilitate!!!! There are drugs there and you most of the time come out and go right back to your old ways. Sure some people do change, but the number of people who don't change is far greater. You should have the option. Sure some people would choose to go to rehab b/c it's not prison, but why they are there they might learn something that can either hepl them then or sometime down the road. Just b/c someone is a drug addict doesn't mean that they can't change and make something of their lives. It doesn't matter how long they were getting high there is hope for everyone!!!! Hugs
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  #36  
Old 08-16-2004, 10:02 AM
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I am really glad this was posted. I feel very strongly about this subject although that is not the reason my husband is in prison but it could have been nor do I use drugs or alcohol.

I feel our justice system is handling people with drug problems totally wrong. What does locking them up in jail do for someone that has a drug problem? They get out of jail eventually and they will just start using again pretty that is pretty much guaranteed.

They need to put them into some kind of drug treatment program and teach them how to live life sober, not lock them up and let them go through drug withdrawals through the prison system. They need to give them drug education.

This is the exact reason our jail are so over crowded. Just because someone is on drugs does not make them a criminal, it is sickness just like any other sickness and it need to be treated medically not in prison.

Would you lock up someone in prison that had diabetes or cancer? No, they treat them, well drug us is a sickness also and need to be treated as such.

This just my opinion

Laurie
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  #37  
Old 08-16-2004, 10:56 AM
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This is a great and informative thread and I think the nail has been hit on the head. Is prison going to solve it? Is putting someone in treatment going to end the using? No, only the individual can make the decision to enter and complete a program. Prisons are there to protect the public. Does anyone have numbers on prison SAP's vs. others on the streets? No doubt a completely voluntary non-court ordered program would have the best numbers because the individual has decided on their own it is time to stop. If it is proven that a court ordered SAP program is more successful than prison in changing lives then I would support it but, as has been stated here, given a choice the user will always choose drug rehab and the reason will be because they want to avoid prison not that they are fully committed to quitting.
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  #38  
Old 11-06-2004, 12:07 PM
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I think eveybody deserves the chance the first time to get a rehab program. It might be enough to scare some people.
It did not work for my son. He went through several programs under the court system. Even before that, he went to the youth camp in Utah where they spend 7 weeks in harsh desert conditions. Each time he was just going through the motions and returned to his previous behavior. He was laughing at all of us and our attempts.
Now he is coming home from prison in January, wanting desperately to remain drug free. He said he is sick of this life of being away from freedom and family. Yes, prison did the trick and not the first time in prison but the second. He is so stubborn!
He just told me the prison woke him up at midnight to do a random drug test on 100 inmates. He said it felt so good to not be scared of the results. He said that he used to tell himself he did drugs to relieve stress. He has come to realize that drugs were causing most of his stress.
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  #39  
Old 11-06-2004, 03:56 PM
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I don't agree with either choice in this poll. Rehab first...if that doesn't work, THEN jail time.
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Old 11-06-2004, 08:18 PM
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Impressive vote count - too bad the system doesn't operate as we feel it should - its changing, but not fast enough!
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  #41  
Old 11-08-2004, 01:10 AM
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The fact is our system a few decades ago was geared more toward rehabilitation for drug offenders. The probation system was intended to be a rehabilitation tool. Unfortunately politicians learned the greater profit came from incarceration; the greater expenditure from attempts to salvage lives. Prison is not the answer to the drug problem. Prison is not even the answer to the crime problem. For more than 100 years this has been demonstrated and yet, the American people ignore the facts. Rehabilitation is not a magical cure, but it is a far better answer than locking up individuals who most often already suffer mental and emotional problems.

I am a recovering Addict. I have 11 years sobriety this March. The decision was mine to make, but I did not do it alone. I did not receive help from the system when I asked either. In fact, I went 3 times to the facilities available to the uninsured here. And, 3 times, I said I have a drug problem and need help. I also said 3 times I want to die. It took all the courage that I could manage to ask for help, but ask I did. The answer I received each time, "Come back next month". Yes, tell an addict this. I went home and broke out the Quervo Gold and the reefer and I felt better the only way I knew how. Within a few years, I suffered a major stroke due to drug use. Had someone been willing to spend the money to offer me the counciling that I sought I was ready to change. The system saved that meager amount, however I am now a Medicaid and SSI recipient so they lost far more. Do not think my story is unique, because it is not.

It is not just my fate that I have learned from. I love people and all my life those around me have talked to me when they need help or comfort. I know the souls of many, many addicts from not only all over Southeast Texas but many states. Many people want to quit, but know they are alone in their efforts. Help is not available except for the wealthy or insured. And programs do help, even programs as simple as AA or NA.

I quit but not alone. I was blessed with good friends, some of who though they used themselves offered me a strong support system, until I could stand alone in my walk. Unfortunately, too many do not have this, nor do they have benefit of treatment. A treatment program does not have to mean get out and stay clean. Any program has been successful if the things they teach remain with the addict. Some take the tools a program offers and only put them to use many years later. The important thing is that they learned them and when they made the decision to quit, they had them to use.

I have been to 4 and 5 funerals in a single year, where the deaths were drug related. I have lived in many of our local towns and have loved and been loved by a lot of the area addicts. This remains so. I watch these people die premature deaths and I am ever amazed that society can turn a blind eye to their pain. Addicts, even those of us who do not like to admit it many times self medicate. There is a prevalence of depression anxiety disorder, and after a few years of drug abuse often schizophrenia. We lack self-confidence, self control and the normal will to live. There is in the vast majority no desire to harm others, only self. Locking someone up in this condition can benefit noone, least of all the addict. I have saw dozens of examples over the years, including many of those we have laid to rest.

My fiance is on death row. Drugs were a big part of his fate. When he was a child in trouble, our system locked him up. As an adult, he suffers an existence that rips at my soul, but many in society would honestly believe because drugs were a part of his life he deserves whatever he gets. Noone deserves the pain of addiction or punishment for their illness. Yes, punish crime if they commit them beyond their use, but treat the illness. This country has for a profit motive created a drug problem that is becoming epidemic. A problem that now condemns millions and that can only condemn more.

It will get worse. Americans spend billions on medical care to be prescribed drugs such as oxycontin, valium, codeine, etc. I have met those who tell me it is not the same. Their medication is prescribed. They should meet the dozen people I have watched suffer life-threatening withdrawal from oxy, which are nothing less than a refined form of heroine. These people had better hope rehab works, because they will need it. However, they do not have to worry with prison because they score legally. When I stood over a friends teenage son and we said goodbye to him our final time, I saw where the system is taking us clear as day. That child’s life was not worth the cost of rehabilitation, yet government officials happily line their bank accounts with kickbacks from a prison system that has became a billion-dollar industry in our country.

Ronald Reagan declared a war on drugs, long ago. Our prison system now houses 2 million, with 8 of 10 in for drugs. Does it sound as if we are winning the war by incarceration. The sad fact is there are programs that work. They require intensive supervision, strict guidelines, drug testing, and dedicated staff. They require money that taxpayers do not want to spend, until it is their child we bury.

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Old 11-08-2004, 07:09 AM
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KrickeT,
That is an excellent writing. I agree when somebody goes to a rehab program and asks for help they should get it immediately. That is the best time to help a person change. But many times the program is wasted on people who go there only because it is court ordered. My son went a couple of times but he only went because he had to, he had no intention of giving up the drugs. In fact, he admitted scoring the day he got out. All of his friends do the same thing.
It would be wonderful if the people who asked for the help would get immediate admittance. Those are the peolple most likely to be saved. Or if they would put somebody in the treatment when they are at their lowest.
Example, I once called the police because my son was acting crazy from whatever drugs he was on and threatening to kill himself in my front yard. When the police got there, they found an illegal knife in his pocket. They put him in jail for a weapons charge instead of sending him for psych help. He ended up with a felony charge with a 5 year sentence. He pled guilty beause he was told it was "easier" and that he didn't have a chance since he was caught with the "weapon" and it didn't matter what the intention was. The courts also made it sound worse on his record because it states that my son was found with an" illegal weapon during an altercation with his father". He had no intention of hurting anybody but himself. The "altercation" was my husband trying to calm my son down so he wouldn't hurt himself.
So I guess it is all in the timing of when the treatment is given. It is best if the person realizes he has hit bottom and not when the addict is going through the motions to avoid jail time.
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  #43  
Old 11-08-2004, 09:43 AM
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Well Said Kricket!!!!!!!!!
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  #44  
Old 11-08-2004, 09:53 AM
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As Far As Giving First Time Offenders A Break Like Some Of U Have Posted....not In My Case. My Fiance Had Absolutly No Previous Record And He Was Cut A Deal To Serve 3 Years Minumum And Could Of Got Up To 26 Years For Selling Methamphedamines. Its Just Not Right. He Did The Crime And He Deserves To Be Punished But Not In This Way. I Think They Should Look At Each Case Individually Not Just "well, He Sold This Amount So Hes Gonna Do This Amount Of Time" W/out Looking At The Person And Their History. He Was A Full Time Student Trying To Make A Little Extra Cash To Help Pay The Bills-ya Its Wrong The Way He Did It But Working At Burger King Just Dosnt Cut It.
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Old 11-08-2004, 06:43 PM
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You are right, if an addict opens himself or herself up to ask for help there should be no delay. The window of opportunity is small, because we are acting in fear to begin with. Given any excuse, we will abandon the entire idea of treatment and crawl back into our comfort zone. Still, never doubt the staying power of what is learned even in forced treatment. Treatment in any form has a very real potential to be of benefit.

What many people do not understand is noone knows the extent of the wrongs the addict does better than the addicts themselves. Guilt for our wrongs is much of the reason recovery is such a long way off for many of us. We may not seem to care. We may not seem to take the value of the steps and the counciling seriously, but they most often hit home inside of us. Believe it or not, no person alive has less respect for a drug addict than addicts.

What people must consider before they declare forced treatment a waste is, will it be better that a person is forced to learn the things that will help them stay clean and possibly use them ten or even twenty years after the teaching to get sober, or is best they never have the teachings that can save them at all. It is the same as saying treatment is not worth it, because only 2 of 10 will walk away clean and remain that way. In my mind, those 2 who make it represent 6 children somewhere who will have a sober parent `12 grandchildren who will have a sober role model, a community that will have a contributing member that will give service and possibly save 2 others, and a country that will sooner or later 2 by 2 save enough people that we may actually see a real difference made. It truly is one day at a time and it is also, one heart at a time.

There is research that shows we can at least save 40% of those put into forced treatment if the money is spent on the right programs. If our politicians want a drug war, this would be the way to do it. These programs are tough on drug crime and most importantly tough as hell on the addict. They make the grade or they do time, knowing when they are cut loose, they face the same test again. As well, there is no 30 days of treatment and your out. The programs that change lives extend to at least the 18 month threshold that assures an addict who has maintained sobriety has begun to get a real grasp on life as a functioning member of society. The cost seems extreme in the beginning but, it is also shown that after 1 offender has spent 3 years clean society has saved thousands in incarceration fees, cost of law enforcement,copurt costs and reduced waste of property and life.

If anyone has a loved one in trouble, I recommend fight for treatment every time you have the chance. They will take something away each time they are a part of a program. If, they are incarcerated they will take things away too, but these things will not be conducive to sobriety. We seldom see the inside of an addict. I have spent a lifetime hid in fear and shame.Even 11 years clean I have only begun to face the guilt that has lain heavily on my soul for decades. I learned to stay clean one word and one lesson at a time, so can others.

Our country is facing a crisis as hard as our politicians try to keep us from realizing it is happening. The number of incarcerated grows at frightening rates, not yearly or monthly, but weekly and daily in this country. Still, drug use is not diminished it only increases. Prisons are not going to fail us they have already. We, as a nation must now find a way to make people understand that if we save any human life it is worth more than the almighty dollar we so fear spending.

Most importantly we must also make them understand that one life at a time salvaged certainly beats our past record.

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Old 11-08-2004, 08:50 PM
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Wow. Excellent writing!
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Old 02-06-2005, 10:51 AM
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Thanks for the great writing KrickeT!

I'm a sober guy who has gone into prisons to try to help others (and keep me sober!). While I would dearly like to fix all the government programs or non-programs to maximize the chance of recovery to those inflicted with alcoholism and addiction, I think that is beyond my power...the wheels of government turn way too slowly for me!

I continually ask myself what it is I can do to try to help the person who still suffers. On some days, I'd tell you that the person has to be willing...to admit they have a huge problem and that they need help. Yet, I've sat in the visiting areas of prisons, talking with guys, and (my observation is that) there are very few who will admit they have a problem or, if they acknowledge the problem, will try to do anything about it. Many have told me that they will drink/use the hour they get out. Some of them have proved that to me!

My point (besides the one on top of my head) is that if a trip or trips to prison won't make alcoholics/addicts reach out for help, what will? A few days behind bars convinced my life was a mess, but I'm one of the very lucky ones. Yet, I don't think we should let people who kill people in car accidents go because they are using or drinking. If someone robs a store 'because' they are high on something, I don't think rehab is suitable if they won't admit they have a problem.

A local government program (28 day type) detoxs and counsels the same guys over and over. 4 or 5 turns in the barrel isn't unusual. I visit there a couple times a week and try to help. I'm in California.

I've tried to help with my wallet (bad idea!), giving shelter (great if you want your house robbed), being a friend, and actively pursuing 12 Step stuff (which I still do). Yet, to me, the results are pretty dismal. My experience is the same as yours, while there are lots of recoveries there are way too many funerals. And far too many people actively pursuing the lifestyle of addiction and, to hear them tell it, hating it. In total, not a pretty picture although there are bright spots of recovery.

I don't know what the government should do. I don't think Prop 36 in California has wiped out addiction--statistics I've seen indicate it is a success so the approach has helped some. Ex-Governor Davis tried to gut it--there is a reason he is "EX" governor. But, I know that kids can still get drugs yet we have a society where it is unacceptable to rat out your dealer. I know that kids who get booze because there are sick adults who send them down the path who are not held responsible. I know that selling drugs is big business, big money and that, we as a society, pay for that. By being users or by cleaning up the wreckage. Those problems are too big for me to handle.

I don't know the answers. Often I question if my own efforts are worth much. The guys I have "helped" (who are still clean after years) would probably have "gotten it" from someone else. I've probably only helped myself by trying to help them. I'd really like to know what I could do to reach that person whose defenses seem inpregnable...the person goes back to prison over and over for the same stuff, leaving behind loved ones, families and friends. One of those people is in my life today, and it just keeps getting worse and worse. In the end, after years in prison, months in jail, months in high cost rehabs, he always "chooses" to use again. It is very sad.
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Old 02-06-2005, 12:32 PM
MissMySoulmate MissMySoulmate is offline
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I agree with joeslilbaby. Think about it! Rapists, murderers, and robbers have victims who are not willing to participate in the crime. A drug user is their own victim. They're not involving others. If others wish to be involved then it is with their consent.

Why are drug users being comparable to violent criminals? Yes, yes, I know that sometimes drugs can lead to violent crimes, but I've known co-workers, family, and friends that had substance abuse problems and never violently hurt anyone. Not one.


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I totally agree, It is just that, say a young dumb kid gets caught dealing and they throw this kid in a place with murders, rapists, it doesn't seem right... u know?
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Old 02-06-2005, 12:36 PM
MissMySoulmate MissMySoulmate is offline
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Marjohar - do you ever think that it could have been you instead of your husband? I think about that sometimes.



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Toi You are absolutely correct. My husband was picked up by the Feds they put him in a rehab before sentencing , done good was going to get to self surrender all he had to do was stay clean. Call PO once a week and do random drops when he was told too. Within 2 mos. he wasn't calling no more and dropped dirty 2 times before he quit calling in. Needless to say the Federal Marshalls picked him up as soon as they found him. He has now been in for 3 1/2 years and has been clean the whole time still having 2 years to go. Prison saved his life and I know he is done with the drugs as am I. I also quit right after he went in. They have to want to quit. The sentences are way to harsh but sometimes Prison is all that can make them quit. Prison or Death.
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Old 02-06-2005, 12:46 PM
MissMySoulmate MissMySoulmate is offline
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Splooofy, there is hope. This sounded like I was reading about my brother's past and my mother's words. My brother was 26 years old before he finally left drugs for good. Drugs were always available through visitors slipping drugs to them and from corrupt COs. So the temptation is there too. 10 years later after leaving his habit, my brother now owns his own business and makes too much money, is married, and has four wonderful healthy children. It depends on the individual. The stronger family unit he was raised by, the better chance he has. You sound like what we went through and I bet you did your best and that he will come out of it and succeed. Tough love is the hardest but has the most rewarding outcome.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Splooofy
My son Has been in and out of Rehabs since the age of 14. He is now 23 and in prison. The Rehabs were a joke. He called then Camp Snoopy. Plus he wasn't ready to quit so nothing in the world would have helped him. Since his age of 14 he has been in Juv camps, Juv Hall, Charter Rehab, A half way house, Jail and now Prison. The rehabs often don't provide enough time for the drug to get completly out of their system. A 2 year sentance in Prison has. I have offered bribes to get my son to quit using, pleaded with him, done intervention and the bottom line is that it won't work until he is ready. Just when I think he has hit bottom he is back to shooting up. It tears the hell out of a family to watch this happen to a son, brother, grandson.......but I now know that he has to do it for himself. I have decided to love him unconditionally, but I don't have to like him nor do I have to accept his behavior. I have also recconed with the fact that he will either die from this addiction or the will be in and out of prison for the rest of his life. I just cannot see any light at the end of the tunnel.

Best to all! Julie
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