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Death Row & Capital Punishment Discussions Discussions relating to inmates on Death Row / facing capital punishment in the United States and abroad that don't fit into any of the other forums

View Poll Results: Which do you think is a tougher penalty?
Life in prison 246 56.42%
Death penalty 190 43.58%
Voters: 436. You may not vote on this poll

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  #26  
Old 06-22-2005, 11:29 AM
EvieMae EvieMae is offline
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I would imagine that LIFE would be harder to deal with, but I am NOT against the death penalty for certain crimes.
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Old 06-22-2005, 08:48 PM
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You know, I am torn on this one. I voted that death would be a tougher penalty, but now Im not really sure which would be. I dont really believe in the death penalty. I think that would be harder, because if you have a family, you arent the only one going through it. But of course it is the same for lifers. At least with life in prison, you can be around (at least a little) to be with loved ones and if you have children, watch them grow. But that is just my opinion.
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  #28  
Old 06-22-2005, 09:10 PM
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My views on the Death Penalty:

I have been a Death Row 'wife' for the past seven years. Though many believe that the DP affects only the man or woman sentenced to die in the most eggregious of ways,
it certainly affects the wife or husband, and other family members left at home. As a DR 'wife', I am fortunate; due to the Supreme Courts ruling, my husband, will be removed from DR in a short time. I have prayed for this day, always believing my husband's life had a purpose.

I never thought about the Death Penalty in any aspect before 1996; I had lived a full life, served in the military, attended college, and enjoyed family and friends. In 1997 or thereso, my brother gave me a book written by DR inmate Mumia Abu-Jamal. Its title, Live from Death Row. I read it from cover to end, intrigued, questioning the saneness of a system that sought to imprison unlawfully. Abu-Jamal's predicament spoke to me in that I had served this country and experienced a control that sought to undermine me, to take away my freedom. I learned to fight against the system, much like Abu-Jamal did through his powerful essays.

In 1998, I was online seeking to write a penpal, possibly from another country and by chance, I came across an ad that was my husband's. It was a page from the PrisonPenPals.com site, and I read it and tried to make out the picture that was his. I couldn't tell what my husband looked like, I just knew that he was someone I had to meet. I did not hesitate to write him. Within a few weeks, I had a reply. From that point on, we wrote, sharing ideas, beliefs, and goals for the future. A future that might find me without him as a friend.

It is a common fact that when we love someone on the inside, we don't look at what they have done in the past, better yet, what they may have done to arrive at their station in life does not phase us because we see into their hearts. We see the changes they have made to better themselves. On Death Row, this is the only thing a man can do, for solitude envelopes them and allows them to reflect.

Another common thing, for one on Death Row, is that they lose contact with the outside world. Family drops away, either from distance and dealing with their daily lives, or because seperation is better, dissassociation helps to mend fences with a society that decided the sentenced man or woman was better off condemned. This seperation is so final, and it is the harshest aspect of confinement on the Row. It leaves one there feeling desolate, withoug hope, knowing loneliness.

In the case of my husband, he was sentenced to DR at the age of 17; this was 1990. I worked as an educator at the time I met my husband, and understood that a juvenile acts and processes life differently than an adult. To quit things undertaken, to believe in immortality, to see only as far as the night's outcome, is their capacity. My husband was such a youth, his ideals at the time shaped by the streets that claimed him. His path a product of a home life that did not allow him a blueprint for success as my own had. Knowing this helped me form my opinion about DR. I believed in my heart that he deserved another chance, that the state of Florida needed to look at his case again, and grant him life, if nothring more. Every letter to my husband promoted these thoughts, and when I began to visit him, the moments before leaving were tear-filled because of this resolve. Eventually, I learned to be strong and the tears stopped, prayers took over, and I waited.

While I waited, I researched, looked at law, read and prayed he would be spared his life. I grew closer to his family, and by doing so opened an avenue that allowed some healing between them, that closed a rift to the greater extent. My husband will attest to this, and though he feels there are patterns to the life his family lives that he cannot alter, he knows he wants to help them see a future different than what might be if he should ever get out.

And what is my opinion on the Death Penalty is the question at hand. In March 2003, I believe, my husband and I did seperate interviews with a German Television station. A question was asked of me regarding how I felt about the Death Penalty in regards to a juvenile.

My answer (then and currently): To say a young man or lady is not worthy of rehablition is wrong. They can change, can become productive members of society if given the chance. We build more prisons with the goal of locking up anyone who is incorrigible in lieu of society's standards. we fail to build and revamp schools. The problems is that education is devalued and killing is lauded where our young people are concerned. Yes, they have done wrong, taken a life, harmed someone, taken a family's loved one away, however, what are the factors that put them there. What hand does society play when we look at government spending, at the lack of available social service programs for the mother struggling to raise a family of too many children and few employment opportunities. Blame it on the country, the state, the county? Not fully, but collectively will suffice. Each has played a hand in the demise of our youth one way or the other. Each is culpable for failing to implement a safety net that would have quelled loss on all sides, I believe.

There is a memory I hold in my heart where my husband's time on Death Row is concerned. He and I are soulmates, hearts that came together when time allowed our union. My husband and I were working on a book together. I had stopped writing for a week, to reaccess the writing process. Sitting in my livingroom, I experienced a saddness, an overwhelming feeling that he was experiencing loss. I could only ride the feeling out, could only pray that he would feel better. On a visit thereafter, I learned that a good friend of his had been executed, dragged away to a finality that would seperate him from the life granted him. From friends, such as my husband, that had helped him know compassion where before it was absent.

I held him, and in my heart prayed that I would not know that loss.

The Death Penalty allows any state that fosters it, a killing field, a license to be God. It is a finality, and by all means necessary should be quelled.

We have seen innocent men freed from the row, have read about botched executions that registered the inhumanity of this system.

The Death Penalty is truly an end to life's possibility.

The possibility of change to one condemned before.


Thank you for taking the time to read this, and my prayers are with everyone who has to live with the knowledge their loved one might be put to death.
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  #29  
Old 09-04-2005, 11:11 AM
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Default Death Penalty is worse

I have a loved one on death row in Missouri and I voted that the death penalty is worse. The inmate isen't the only one that has to serve a sentence. His family and friends serve it as well. If an inmate is given a lethal injection he's dead and it's over for him but his loved ones have to go on living with the pain of the situation. We just go on being punished over and over again. The victims families say it brings closure for them but I don't see how it can. It won't bring back they're family member or friend so they can't truly ever feel like it's over. Believe me, we're all in agony when we have someone on death row but to have them serve life helps take a little bit of the suffering away cause we don't have the death thing hanging over us constantly.
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  #30  
Old 09-27-2005, 11:44 PM
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Life in prison is scary, but if the convict prefers death he can always kill himself, right? But banning of capital punishment at least removes "point of no return" in case of judicial mistake.
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  #31  
Old 10-02-2005, 11:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retired-10
I just saw this poll on cnn.com. Without hesitating, I voted that the death penalty was the harsher sentence. You lose your life! That seemed like common sense to me, at least. To see the current results on the cnn.com poll be - 62% life in prison and 38% death penalty - I was shocked! I wanted to get a PTOers take on this so I created the same poll here.

Personally, I do support the death penalty in certain cases...serial killers, situations where there's a "smoking gun"...but NOT in situations like the Scott Peterson case where everything is so circumstantial.

I'm very interested in hearing everyones response!
Incarceration for life is much harsher than death for most of us. Personally, I would rather die than live without my freedom. However, for the criminal, it could be just an adjustment to a different way of living.

This type of poll is inaccurate. The reason is the wording. It makes an appearance that 62% of society opposes capital punishment, when the truth is that a much bigger majority favors it. If you want a truthful opinion, then the truthful question should be:

"Do you support capital punishment (The death penalty) as an exercisable option, for the most heinous crimes?" The answers should be either yes or no.

You will find that type of deception all over the place. CNN is a liberal news outlet.
Boris
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  #32  
Old 10-02-2005, 06:18 PM
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I voted that the death penalty would be harsher. Why, because I can't imagine one of the PTO ladies married to a DR man coming on here saying their husband was executed. That would be too much.
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  #33  
Old 10-05-2005, 01:50 PM
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"how do you excuse a state for putting a man on death row for shooting someone in a robbery, but the next state for giving a man LWOP for the same crime?"

I've noticed that many are upset about the disparity in sentences for similar crimes. And, I've also seen many upset about mandatory time for certain crimes.

So, which is it going to be? Do we want a mandatory sentence for a first offense for a specific crime all across the country, or do we want to issue sentences on a case-by-case basis?
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  #34  
Old 10-05-2005, 03:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LenaInVA
"how do you excuse a state for putting a man on death row for shooting someone in a robbery, but the next state for giving a man LWOP for the same crime?"

I've noticed that many are upset about the disparity in sentences for similar crimes. And, I've also seen many upset about mandatory time for certain crimes.

So, which is it going to be? Do we want a mandatory sentence for a first offense for a specific crime all across the country, or do we want to issue sentences on a case-by-case basis?
It's a difficult question, Lena.

The injustice of mandatory minimums is that they make no allowance whatever for circumstances. With the Federal guidelines written the way they are, they take the power in the courtroom out of the hands of the judge and put it in the hands of the prosecuting theory. How the guidelines have come to do that is a very long story, but if you are interested, I suggest you look at the Wall Street Journal for September 14, 2004, page 1. It was that article that made me realize to what an extent it had happened.

But, OTOH, the death penalty--being given by different sets of standards in the same courtrooms as well as in different states--is the ultimate in disparity. It's one thing to have a person sentenced to 10 hears for possession of cocaine in one courtroom and his accomplice to get probation for the same crime. For a black to get 20 years and a white to get 10 from the same judge (it happens!!!). It's totally another for a person to get life=40 or dp at the whim of a jury that has often been inflamed by a graphic depiction by a prostituting attorney. That is the ultimate disparity.

The federal guidelines were set up by a commission of judges to eliminate some disparities. Sounded great in the 80's. They were copied--sometimes in great detail--by the various state jurisdictions. They were subsequently made mandatory, to the great consternation of some of the same judges who had written them. That took away the balance of power in the courtroom.

It became a bludgeon in the hands of many prosecutors. 95% of cases are settled by guilty plea. The guidelines, plus the fact that they are mandatory, gave the prosecutors a weapon for plea bargaining that had not been foreseen. They have resulted in major, major injustices in the courtroom.

Does that answer your question?
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  #35  
Old 10-05-2005, 05:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LenaInVA
"how do you excuse a state for putting a man on death row for shooting someone in a robbery, but the next state for giving a man LWOP for the same crime?"

I've noticed that many are upset about the disparity in sentences for similar crimes. And, I've also seen many upset about mandatory time for certain crimes.

So, which is it going to be? Do we want a mandatory sentence for a first offense for a specific crime all across the country, or do we want to issue sentences on a case-by-case basis?
Well I personally feel there is nothing wrong in issuing sentences on a case-by-case basis, because all cases are not the same. However, to me it does not make any sense when one state will give the death penalty for a crime and another state will give 20 years. Where is the justice in that? There is none in my opinion.
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  #36  
Old 10-05-2005, 05:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boris
Incarceration for life is much harsher than death for most of us. Personally, I would rather die than live without my freedom. However, for the criminal, it could be just an adjustment to a different way of living.

This type of poll is inaccurate. The reason is the wording. It makes an appearance that 62% of society opposes capital punishment, when the truth is that a much bigger majority favors it. If you want a truthful opinion, then the truthful question should be:

"Do you support capital punishment (The death penalty) as an exercisable option, for the most heinous crimes?" The answers should be either yes or no.

You will find that type of deception all over the place. CNN is a liberal news outlet.
Boris
But that wasn't the question, Boris. The question was "Which do you think is the tougher penalty?"

It's an interesting question from a couple points of view. For many of us, especially those who have never faced imminent death, we can readily imagine the dull boredom and lack of freedom that life imprisonment would mean to us. People who have no likelihood of ever facing the death penalty are likely to feel that doing so would be easier than LWOP. That's pretty well known from a psychological POV.

There's another reason some people are interested in the question. For those who are in favor of dp, a frequent argument is that it is final and prevents any chance of a repeat crime. For opponents, a rebuttal is that LWOP does the same thing and is less harsh and less expensive. So those who are in favor rebut by saying that LWOP is the harsher punishment.

Interestingly, that argument works both ways. If you are using the argument that DP is "just desserts" and you are in favor, you are disposed to claim that DP is the harsher. If you are arguing that DP serves only as revenge and thus is wrong, you will be disposed to claim that LWOP is the harsher.

Either way, it's a Hobson's choice--a choice between two alternatives so harsh that most of us can't really visualize being in the situation. It is probable that, as in both the CNN poll and this one, that most people not faced with the alternative would think that LWOP is the harsher. When one is actually faced with death penalty--well, we know how hard most of them fight to get out of it even if it means LWOP. The instinct for survival is strong indeed
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  #37  
Old 11-04-2005, 10:21 AM
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Death penalty is the harsher, living day after day knowing that at some stage some one is going to kill you, there is no humane way to murder some one, and to know everyday how your going to die, and to know that once that has happened there is no going back. with life its still hard but as long as you are alive you have hope that maybe you will be free again.
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  #38  
Old 11-05-2005, 08:29 AM
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my opinion is just that my own. I think life in prison is harsher. to think you will never be able to go fishing, walk on the beach with your significant other, drive a car, go shopping, spend christmas with your family at home, make lover to your significant other, to me all that is harder. I also think if someone is sentenced to life in prison, why can't they have the option to be put to death. maybe in some cases the person would rather die that to suffer for the rest of their lives and grow old with strangers and finally die with their loved ones present. I do not want to upset anyone. this is just my opinion.

tell me if anyones agrees or disagrees.
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  #39  
Old 11-05-2005, 10:21 AM
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Ok well I think that life is harsher than being put to death, but that isnt the choice really. The choice is life or life on DR waiting to die... in which case I would say DR is harder. If the Death penatly was done in a short persiod of time then that would make it easiest... but the 30 year wait in some cases in a small room without physical contact in many cases? That is just cruel and unusual torture.
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  #40  
Old 11-05-2005, 11:29 AM
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For me, I think life in prison, but then I think about all the death row inmates who fight it. I think the desire to live is very strong, and most people when it comes down to it, choose life.
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  #41  
Old 11-05-2005, 02:57 PM
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the reason they wait so long on deathrow is they are give the chance to appeal and fight their case. i think the inmate should be given the choice to have a speedy death the same way they are given the right to have a speedy trial. this should be the inmate choice.
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  #42  
Old 11-08-2005, 08:56 PM
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Reminds me of Christa Pike's flip-flopping on this very point...

http://www.tsc.state.tn.us/OPINIONS/...043/PikeCG.pdf
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  #43  
Old 11-09-2005, 04:27 AM
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i'm against death penalty but i was raped by my father when i was 3 y old, i heard about that one year ago, my father never went to jail. But in prisons there are guys who killed so many persons and raped women too, who use the rules of Justice to stay alive on death rows .
And there are men who killed (so many times they are innocent) one person and they stay in jail for life .
There is something really weird in U.S...
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  #44  
Old 11-12-2005, 08:03 AM
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not everyone who kills is bad. if you were raped now as an adult, would you want to go to prison for the rest of you killed the man that was raping you? Or if you were in a fight and the person that attack got killed in the process would you want to be responsibl? Well, thats what happens. people do go to prison for killing people even when the circumstanced are that they were defending themselves. It is hard to use the law in your favor even if you kill someone who is known to do bad thing like rape and child molestion. it is sad but true.
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Old 03-22-2006, 08:04 PM
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I agree that the death penalty is worse. If the person on DR is allowed to live, it would give that person the opportunity to make peace with God, and repent for their actions. God is a forgiving God, and I think that it isn't right for any one to take someone's life even if that person committed a murder. Two wrongs don't make a right. And people should consider the DR inmates families, Everyone suffers loss, its a part of life. Just think about it, is taking someone else's life going to ease your pain? Is it going to bring your loved one back? Keep your head up and keep on praying, just have faith. God answers prayers. God Bless! I appologize if I affended anyone.
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  #46  
Old 03-26-2006, 10:27 PM
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Death is much worse because as long as you have your life you have hope that something will change. I would never choose death over life
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  #47  
Old 03-31-2006, 11:21 PM
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Default Life in Prison is much more difficult!

Being in prison for any length of time is terrible. It affects more than 1 person and I hate it!
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  #48  
Old 03-31-2006, 11:35 PM
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Life for sure, because there really is no escape you are there FOREVER!!!!
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  #49  
Old 04-19-2006, 09:30 PM
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We're all going to die one day ... that is one thing we can count on. My man says that he would take the death penalty any day over spending one day in prison. He really, really hates it there.
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  #50  
Old 04-21-2006, 02:55 AM
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I think that LWOP is far worse than a death sentence. When you are in death row you are the center of attention, web site, penpals, people sending money, etc. But if you are serving LWOP you are forgottem over time. I have read on numerous occasions about how as time goes on lifers loose contacts with family- their parents die, and for the most part people move on. So by the time they are in their later years they have nobody except maybe their cellie, if they have one.

That to me is a punishment far worse than leathal injection.
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