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  #226  
Old 08-12-2019, 05:05 AM
MJH141504 MJH141504 is offline
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Hello everyone,

I am currently a CO working in a prison in the United States. Does anyone have any questions that they would want answered from "my" point of view? About life inside the walls, games inmates play, why COs do certain things etc.
Yes! Please help me understand. What happens with a major ticket for sexual misconduct during a video visit? My husband was given a major for talking about sexual things with me. He goes to adjustment committee. Heís supposed to come him in September. This is first and only ticket. Iím concerned. Please help.
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  #227  
Old 08-12-2019, 01:37 PM
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I have a question, I have a friend locked up in a core civic private prison in Oklahoma .... this is all new to me and apparently they are on a lockdown that happens once per year and it's some kind of institutional shakedown .... how long do those last. Its Davis Correctional Facility a 1600 bed prison
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Yes! Please help me understand. What happens with a major ticket for sexual misconduct during a video visit? My husband was given a major for talking about sexual things with me. He goes to adjustment committee. Heís supposed to come him in September. This is first and only ticket. Iím concerned. Please help.
Just a reminder that Biker has generously offered to answer general questions about working on the other side of the fence for us to the best of his ability. He cannot, and should not, offer advice or opinions on jurisdictions outside of the scope of his experience.

You can find state and facility-specific forums to better assist you by clicking here.
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  #228  
Old 08-13-2019, 11:08 AM
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I just wanted to thank Biker for coming here to answer questions. Its really appreciated.
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  #229  
Old 08-16-2019, 08:56 AM
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I just wanted to thank Biker for coming here to answer questions. Its really appreciated.
Thanks for having me here.

I cannot really answer what other depts. do when it comes to infractions. What we do is different that what other depts in other states do. We might dole out 30 days in SHU, while other depts might do 60 days AND take good conduct time.

There are many different factors in play when it comes to policy infractions and even criminal conduct inside the prison (such as bringing in contraband for an inmate)
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  #230  
Old 08-16-2019, 07:00 PM
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Hi Biker Guy,

Is it common at all for inmates or convicted felons to request a higher security prison for placement because they would rather be housed in a cell as opposed to a dormitory? Is there more privacy for the inmate which makes it worth the higher security setting?
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  #231  
Old 08-17-2019, 06:36 AM
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Hi Biker Guy,

Is it common at all for inmates or convicted felons to request a higher security prison for placement because they would rather be housed in a cell as opposed to a dormitory? Is there more privacy for the inmate which makes it worth the higher security setting?
Great question and something I can answer. I've worked with guys that live in the lower security prisons with dormitory setting and also in the higher security 2 man cells.

I've talked to guys who have started at the higher security and moved to the lower. What some have told me is that they do prefer higher security. Alot of it is privacy. It's better to deal with one other roommate than a full room of 6-12 guys or a huge "warehouse" of 50-100 beds. It's less drama, less fights and disagreements on space and conduct. We might have kids (early 20s) housed with OGs (guys in their 40s-50s) in the same room. That can create conflict. Also with larger rooms, more personalities from different races. Blacks and Hispanics sometimes don't mix nicely. It makes it hard to just "get away" from everyone. Something that is easier to do in a 2 man cell with a good cellie that respects your space.

Also for guys who have been locked up for a while, the freedom of open dorms is nerve wracking. Higher security yes has more violence and they are used to that. They are out of their element with all the openness of the dorms and they don't feel as safe.....even though it is less violent in the lower security prisons. Finally, because it is less violent, there is more petty drama and less respect between the inmates. I've had quite a few OGs tell me that the "kids" have no respect, don't listen (to the older inmates) and don't know how to "jail" (conduct themselves properly).

I hope this makes sense.
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  #232  
Old 08-17-2019, 11:43 AM
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Hi biker guy,

Thank you so much for the response. I appreciate your insight.

I guess I was thinking serving time in a lower security fed prison would be better maybe easier with more flexibility to move around and maybe come and go around the facility with less restrictions. But my son would rather have high (er) security placement and would prefer to confined alone even if it means spending the majority of the day in the cell. Privacy and the least amount of interaction with inmates are his preference.

What you described is very consistent to the feedback I’ve received from other.

Thank you so much for coming on here and being so helpful and supportive. This is all new to my husband and I and there’s so much to know and understand
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  #233  
Old 08-17-2019, 10:06 PM
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Hi biker guy,

Thank you so much for the response. I appreciate your insight.

I guess I was thinking serving time in a lower security fed prison would be better maybe easier with more flexibility to move around and maybe come and go around the facility with less restrictions. But my son would rather have high (er) security placement and would prefer to confined alone even if it means spending the majority of the day in the cell. Privacy and the least amount of interaction with inmates are his preference.

What you described is very consistent to the feedback Iíve received from other.

Thank you so much for coming on here and being so helpful and supportive. This is all new to my husband and I and thereís so much to know and understand

Every person does their time differently. Some guy are perfectly fine in the lower security. Others rather be in a higher tier. There are many factors in play. And quite frankly it's beyond my understanding. My viewpoint just scratches the surface. I only do 8 hours a day 40 hours week. It's not my 24/7 life. I can only voice what the guys tell me. When more than one tells me similar stories at separate unrelated times..it allows me to form a broad understanding on their view point.

Some like the structure and can't handle the freedom of lower tier prisons.
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  #234  
Old 08-18-2019, 09:55 AM
MJH141504 MJH141504 is offline
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Thanks for having me here.

I cannot really answer what other depts. do when it comes to infractions. What we do is different that what other depts in other states do. We might dole out 30 days in SHU, while other depts might do 60 days AND take good conduct time.

There are many different factors in play when it comes to policy infractions and even criminal conduct inside the prison (such as bringing in contraband for an inmate)
Thank you!
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  #235  
Old 08-18-2019, 05:09 PM
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My boyfriend is in the county in nys do they always put you back in the same prison that you left he's on s parole violation my other question is do alot of inmates keep going back to the same stuff
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  #236  
Old 08-18-2019, 07:06 PM
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My boyfriend is in the county in nys do they always put you back in the same prison that you left he's on s parole violation my other question is do alot of inmates keep going back to the same stuff
There are many factors in play when it comes to deciding where someone ends up on a parole violation.

He could go back, or he could stay in county or due to population numbers he could go to a completely different prison.

Unfortunately recidivism rate (chances of going back to prison) is really high in the United States. Currently it is around 70% the person will end up back in prison within 5 years of release.
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  #237  
Old 08-21-2019, 05:32 PM
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Do most co's think women with incarcerated men are crazy and desperate?

What do you think are the most important things a released inmate needs to keep from reoffending?
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  #238  
Old 08-23-2019, 05:15 PM
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Do most co's think women with incarcerated men are crazy and desperate?

What do you think are the most important things a released inmate needs to keep from reoffending?
Hello, You have an interesting two part question. As for your first part, Most COs who are working day to day in a unit really don't think too much about inmate's personal relationships outside the prison. There is so much to worry about that happens inside the walls that we don't even think about girlfriends or wives who they talk to or write too.

We are human too but I would not use the term "crazy and desperate" when describing a relationship between an inmate and a person on the outside. It is always within human nature to judge others I can't deny that. We wonder sometimes "what is she doing with him?" and things of that nature when we work in the visiting room. But honestly (this is how I feel) there are 2 million people in the Crim Justice system and each and everyone has a different story and we can't blanket judge people the same regardless if their stories are superficially the same.
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  #239  
Old 08-23-2019, 05:54 PM
Bikerguy Bikerguy is offline
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Do most co's think women with incarcerated men are crazy and desperate?

What do you think are the most important things a released inmate needs to keep from reoffending?
As to the second part of your question. well books upon books and papers upon papers have been written about recidivism.

To keep it simple I'll talk about 4 things that I feel would be most helpful:

1. Having an antisocial peer group.
Don't hang out with people who get into trouble. Easier said than done, know. But the recently released inmate has to ask himself, those people that he is hanging out with now....do they really care for him as a friend? Where they really there for him when he was locked up? Will they be there if he gets locked up again? Are they steering him down the wrong path again? Drinking and Drugging? Doing the same crimes that he did when he was locked up the 1st time.

2. Having a drug and alcohol dependency
We all like having a good time.......but we need to know our limits and if drinking and drugging will steer us down that dark path again.

3. A lack of self-control
Basically being able to make sound decisions and evaluate the repercussions of those decisions. How they can hurt us and our family.

4. An antisocial belief system
Anti-social behaviors are actions that harm or lack consideration for the well-being of others. It has also been defined as any type of conduct that violates the basic rights of another person and any behavior that is considered to be disruptive to others in society.

I know, that's a lot of big words. But what does it really mean? The way I view it is, we can sit a person down and force him to get his GED while in prison. We can also offer trades classes and also even support college while in the system. But it is up to the individual themselves to change their behavior. Many people go back to their old ways when they get out and that leads them into trouble. I think it's because they really don't know any different.

Life is not easy to begin with. It is 100x harder for someone with a criminal record. Many doors are shut when that Felon label is placed on someone. It does take a very strong individual with a VERY STRONG positive support group to overcome those obstacles and not re-offend.

There are certain programs in prison that can help the inmate change his behavior, identify those things he did and how to change it. Unfortunately there is not enough of that sort of program in the system. We can have inmates teach GED classes and it be overseen by a CO and it does not cost the prison a lot of money. But the programs needed to really change behavior cost
a lot of money. Its the salaries of many professional psychologists on staff to address and help inmates with their behaviors over a long period of time. (can't fix it overnight)

But when it comes to slash the criminal justice budget at any level...who do they slash? Not the police, not the FBI, or ATF or ICE. But the prison system, I know because I feel the pinch too, with mandatory overtimes, less staff, programs cut etc, I see it.

Well I think I rambled on for quite a bit this time. I hope everyone made it to the end of this post.

Last edited by Bikerguy; 08-23-2019 at 05:57 PM..
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  #240  
Old 08-25-2019, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Bikerguy View Post
As to the second part of your question. well books upon books and papers upon papers have been written about recidivism.

To keep it simple I'll talk about 4 things that I feel would be most helpful:

1. Having an antisocial peer group.
Don't hang out with people who get into trouble. Easier said than done, know. But the recently released inmate has to ask himself, those people that he is hanging out with now....do they really care for him as a friend? Where they really there for him when he was locked up? Will they be there if he gets locked up again? Are they steering him down the wrong path again? Drinking and Drugging? Doing the same crimes that he did when he was locked up the 1st time.

2. Having a drug and alcohol dependency
We all like having a good time.......but we need to know our limits and if drinking and drugging will steer us down that dark path again.

3. A lack of self-control
Basically being able to make sound decisions and evaluate the repercussions of those decisions. How they can hurt us and our family.

4. An antisocial belief system
Anti-social behaviors are actions that harm or lack consideration for the well-being of others. It has also been defined as any type of conduct that violates the basic rights of another person and any behavior that is considered to be disruptive to others in society.

I know, that's a lot of big words. But what does it really mean? The way I view it is, we can sit a person down and force him to get his GED while in prison. We can also offer trades classes and also even support college while in the system. But it is up to the individual themselves to change their behavior. Many people go back to their old ways when they get out and that leads them into trouble. I think it's because they really don't know any different.

Life is not easy to begin with. It is 100x harder for someone with a criminal record. Many doors are shut when that Felon label is placed on someone. It does take a very strong individual with a VERY STRONG positive support group to overcome those obstacles and not re-offend.

There are certain programs in prison that can help the inmate change his behavior, identify those things he did and how to change it. Unfortunately there is not enough of that sort of program in the system. We can have inmates teach GED classes and it be overseen by a CO and it does not cost the prison a lot of money. But the programs needed to really change behavior cost
a lot of money. Its the salaries of many professional psychologists on staff to address and help inmates with their behaviors over a long period of time. (can't fix it overnight)

But when it comes to slash the criminal justice budget at any level...who do they slash? Not the police, not the FBI, or ATF or ICE. But the prison system, I know because I feel the pinch too, with mandatory overtimes, less staff, programs cut etc, I see it.

Well I think I rambled on for quite a bit this time. I hope everyone made it to the end of this post.

I agree with a lot of your points, however these classes and/or mental health services are not readily available within a lot of the prisons (here in IL). They are unable to find qualified staff. There is no accountability for a lot of the staff they have. The staff is spread too thin. Thereís a multitude of reasons. My husband went back in on a PV in February. He was open and honest during classification about his issues in hopes that he would be sent to a prison that had mental health services available. Instead they looked at his history on paper, classified him as a high escape risk, gave him a restricted ID which prohibits him from attending any night classes (or even going outside), and shipped him off to a prison that not only has no mental health counselor, no classes at all except GED (he is college educated) and horticulture. They have not been able to find staff to run any programs there. He canít even do anger mgmt. There were four other prisons within IDOC that had qualifying services he mightíve actually benefited from. Why none of those? He had to dumb himself down to fail the tape test so he could get in the daytime GED class so he can earn some good time and get out of his cell. This is my second and last round of prison with him, but there is a stark difference in this state between functioning prisons. There is no consistency, or accountability. This stint is breaking him. Emotionally and mentally. The prison heís in is horrible from top to bottom and our state wants to preach about recidivism?! If he didnít have a loving, solid support system at home like he does, this beautiful man would no doubt come out worse off and commit another crime. It makes ZERO sense to me why he was placed here, especially when he set his ego aside. Talked about his issues, as well as looking at his history on paper. Itís clear he needs to be incarcerated at a facility with SOME rehabilitative services to keep him going, trying to become a better him and possibly learning new coping skills. I know private therapy and counseling after incarceration is key, but for this two years heís going to get nothing. Heís weakening mentally, and my heart aches for the conditions he is enduring and the way the inmates are treated at this specific facility. And I canít do shit about it! I even contacted the news media in the area, and they said theyíve been getting complaints for years and nothing happens. The warden is unreachable. The asst warden is on his sixth prison in the state and doesnít care, and Iíve been to Springfield and back about a transfer. Our only hope is on 2 more months when he puts in for one. But heís been there four months already and hasnít even met his counselor or received a response to fifteen different request slips heís put in for various things.
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  #241  
Old 08-25-2019, 11:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Peacefinder View Post
Do most co's think women with incarcerated men are crazy and desperate?
I know I'm not a CO but I can answer with how they've treated me. Most have been indifferent/professional but a few have gone out of their way to show interest and support to my husband and me. We had a 15 month wait to get married (paperwork, lost paperwork, blah blah) and one day my husband's supervisor was working the processing desk for visiting. He vetted ME. Asked what I did for a living, what my future plans were, where I lived. I guess some may have seen it as prying but to be honest, this guy treated my husband like a son. It felt like the same questions a potential in-law would ask. He was looking out. We've had that level of communication with a few. So no, I don't think they think we're all crazy and desperate. I think some women are crazy and some women are desperate, but prison is just variable there.

I've been treated worse by other visitors.
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  #242  
Old 08-29-2019, 06:52 AM
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I agree with a lot of your points, however these classes and/or mental health services are not readily available within a lot of the prisons (here in IL). They are unable to find qualified staff. There is no accountability for a lot of the staff they have. The staff is spread too thin.
I agree with you 100%. Things are not readily available. It just comes down to the budget. Very few people want to invest the money into the system. They would rather take money and divert it to other areas and programs within the state or federal government. There really is only so much money to go around. Along with the budget is finding qualified people to do the job. Not everyone wants to or can handle working behind the fence in ether a LE capacity or to provide educational or mental health services.
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  #243  
Old 08-29-2019, 07:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Bikerguy View Post
As to the second part of your question. well books upon books and papers upon papers have been written about recidivism.

To keep it simple I'll talk about 4 things that I feel would be most helpful:

1. Having an antisocial peer group.
Don't hang out with people who get into trouble. Easier said than done, know. But the recently released inmate has to ask himself, those people that he is hanging out with now....do they really care for him as a friend? Where they really there for him when he was locked up? Will they be there if he gets locked up again? Are they steering him down the wrong path again? Drinking and Drugging? Doing the same crimes that he did when he was locked up the 1st time.

2. Having a drug and alcohol dependency
We all like having a good time.......but we need to know our limits and if drinking and drugging will steer us down that dark path again.

3. A lack of self-control
Basically being able to make sound decisions and evaluate the repercussions of those decisions. How they can hurt us and our family.

4. An antisocial belief system
Anti-social behaviors are actions that harm or lack consideration for the well-being of others. It has also been defined as any type of conduct that violates the basic rights of another person and any behavior that is considered to be disruptive to others in society.

I know, that's a lot of big words. But what does it really mean? The way I view it is, we can sit a person down and force him to get his GED while in prison. We can also offer trades classes and also even support college while in the system. But it is up to the individual themselves to change their behavior. Many people go back to their old ways when they get out and that leads them into trouble. I think it's because they really don't know any different.

Life is not easy to begin with. It is 100x harder for someone with a criminal record. Many doors are shut when that Felon label is placed on someone. It does take a very strong individual with a VERY STRONG positive support group to overcome those obstacles and not re-offend.

There are certain programs in prison that can help the inmate change his behavior, identify those things he did and how to change it. Unfortunately there is not enough of that sort of program in the system. We can have inmates teach GED classes and it be overseen by a CO and it does not cost the prison a lot of money. But the programs needed to really change behavior cost
a lot of money. Its the salaries of many professional psychologists on staff to address and help inmates with their behaviors over a long period of time. (can't fix it overnight)

But when it comes to slash the criminal justice budget at any level...who do they slash? Not the police, not the FBI, or ATF or ICE. But the prison system, I know because I feel the pinch too, with mandatory overtimes, less staff, programs cut etc, I see it.

Well I think I rambled on for quite a bit this time. I hope everyone made it to the end of this post.
I agree also. I served 7 years Federal and the biggest contributing factor to futur success was the individual initiative of inmates to turn what is a lemon into lemonade. I volunteered to teach business and technology classes in the education department to be productive with my own time, and helped hundreds of inmates craft resumes. The system is imperfect, but inmates that focused on creating any kind of experience track while there (jobs in electrical, maintenance, HVAC, and even food service!) allowed inmates to build a skills profile (where often they had none before prison) smoothed the transition home when that time inevitably came. Of course, getting a GED if they had no high school degree was also very helpful in improving their prospects. Bottom line, itís up to each individual to ďhave the wantsĒ to improve their circumstances.
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  #244  
Old 09-01-2019, 10:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Bikerguy View Post
Hello everyone,

I am currently a CO working in a prison in the United States. Does anyone have any questions that they would want answered from "my" point of view? About life inside the walls, games inmates play, why COs do certain things etc.
I have a question. My husband was put in confinement for illegal drug use first, then a second charge of possession. He was in the bathroom while people were smoking but went to his rack. They woke him up and took him to the box. He passed his urinalysis. The guy in the holding tank with him tested positive and tried to hide drugs. A LT searched my husband and didn't find anything, but on his DR, it stated a Sgt searched him and found something. They took his gain time and he had only 2 months before he got out. How do we fight this and get his gain time returned?
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Old 09-02-2019, 12:22 PM
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I have a question. My husband was put in confinement for illegal drug use first, then a second charge of possession. He was in the bathroom while people were smoking but went to his rack. They woke him up and took him to the box. He passed his urinalysis. The guy in the holding tank with him tested positive and tried to hide drugs. A LT searched my husband and didn't find anything, but on his DR, it stated a Sgt searched him and found something. They took his gain time and he had only 2 months before he got out. How do we fight this and get his gain time returned?
Unfortunately I cannot give legal advice of this nature. It sounds like he is pending an incident report. All he can do Is fight it through the prison system and when it goes for the hearing to tell his side of the story that the drugs were not his, he never had any on him etc. But it is an uphill battle because it is his word against a CO's.
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Old 09-02-2019, 05:15 PM
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Default What does promoting contraband mean?

A someone I know was just found guilty of promoting contraband at Perryville. It said it was a major violation. What does this mean, and what would punishment be like?

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Old 09-03-2019, 12:27 AM
B3tokar1 B3tokar1 is offline
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Do inmate workers work with females,?
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Old 09-03-2019, 12:53 PM
Bikerguy Bikerguy is offline
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A someone I know was just found guilty of promoting contraband at Perryville. It said it was a major violation. What does this mean, and what would punishment be like?

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Promoting contraband is another term for introducing contraband into the prison.

It can mean a felony charge and more time for the inmate and also similar charges if say a visitor was involved.
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  #249  
Old 09-03-2019, 12:54 PM
Bikerguy Bikerguy is offline
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Do inmate workers work with females,?
Yes we have female COs and other personal in a male prison.
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Old 09-03-2019, 01:08 PM
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What color uniforms do the correctional officers wear in the New York Dept. of Corrections, Bikerguy? In Texas, they wear grey uniforms with a navy blue stripe down the leg.
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