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Old 09-20-2004, 12:48 PM
FrozenInMinn FrozenInMinn is offline
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Challenge Incarceration Program</SPAN>


Mandated by the 1992 Minnesota Legislature, the Challenge Incarceration Program (CIP) is an intensive, rigorous, highly structured and disciplined program for carefully selected, non-dangerous drug and property offenders. This program has a high level of offender control and accountability. It is for both male and female offenders. CIP has three phases:

Phase I: a minimum of six-months institution phase

Phase II: a highly supervised community phase under intensive surveillance which lasts a minimum of six months

Phase III: a community supervised release phase, generally lasting six months. When offenders successfully complete Phase III, they are placed on supervised release for the remainder of their sentence.

Goals

CIP goals established by state statute are to:
  • punish and hold the offender accountable;
  • protect the safety of the public;
  • treat offenders who are chemically dependent; and
  • prepare offenders for successful reintegration into society and reduce their risk of reoffending.
Criteria
Participation is restricted to offenders committed to the commissioner of corrections following revocation of a stayed sentence and offenders who have 48 months or less in or remaining in their term of imprisonment, and who did not receive a dispositional departure under sentencing guidelines.

Participants are physically and psychologically screened and must meet CIP minimum-security guidelines and sign a written contract agreeing to comply with CIP requirements.

Offenders are reviewed for CIP participation after admission to a state receiving institution. Ineligible offenders include inmates committed or previously committed to prison for certain serious crimes against persons. Specifically noted in law are crimes such as murder, manslaughter, criminal sexual conduct, kidnapping or any offense involving death or intentional injury.

Philosophy Statement

The CIP offender program philosophy statement is: "I have choice and free will. I am accountable for my thoughts, feelings and actions. Today I commit myself to positive change. I will give 110 percent of myself, 100 percent of the time. If I do my best, I will succeed."

INSTITUTION PHASE I
Minnesota Correctional Facility- Willow River/Moose Lake
86032 County Highway 61
Willow River, Minnesota 55795
Phone: 218/372-3101

Warden: Terry Carlson
Opened: 1951 (Challenge began in 1992)
Capacity: 80 Staff Size: 37

The Minnesota Correctional Facility-Willow River/Moose Lake consists of two sites. The facility's Willow River site became the location of the institution phase (Phase I) of CIP in October, 1992. Previously the site served as a vocational skills training program for adult male inmates for 20 years. Prior to that it was a forestry camp.

CIP Phase I has a sterile, austere environment with a rigorous daily schedule. Work, specialized training, chemical dependency programming, education and physical activity are planned for virtually every minute of the day from 5:30 a.m. to lights out at 9:30 p.m. There is no recreational television, and visiting and telephone privileges are severely restricted.

Inmates are required to maintain a high level of program activity and discipline. When they fail to do so they are confronted and directed to conform with program expectations. Failure to respond to directives is handled with immediate sanctions by staff.

Inmates may be removed from CIP and returned to a secure facility if they commit serious and/or repeated rule violations or are found guilty of a misdemeanor or felony offense. An inmate may also be removed if the warden considers the participant to be a risk to the public.

Phase I Programs

Program components include:
Critical thinking skills - All aspects of CIP integrate critical thinking skills development. This instruction, which includes approximately 70 hours of training, is used by all staff as an important component of all inmates' daily routines. It concentrates on developing skills needed to think and solve problems, use social skills, manage emotions, use reasoning, think creatively, and reduce stress.

Chemical dependency (CD) - CD programming is a major focus of CIP as the majority of inmates in the program have a history of chemical abuse. Programs are developed to ensure cultural diversity.

Literacy/education - All inmates are tested to determine academic achievement levels. Individual educational plans are developed to increase literacy levels for inmates who fail literacy criteria. While the emphasis is on literacy, there also is involvement in other educational areas.

Community integration preparation - This class includes approximately 70 hours of formal classroom training. Topics include job seeking and keeping, education continuation, money management, cognitive skills review, health, relationships, stress, self-esteem and values, and vocational exploration.

Physical training - One period of rigorous physical training is conducted every day in addition to an intensive work schedule. Training emphasizes aerobic, overall physical conditioning and those physical activities which can be adapted to a healthy lifestyle.

Behavioral training - Training in regimentation includes intensive instruction in courtesy, close-order drill, and exercise.

Work - An intensive work program is a major component. Most work is manual labor, serving as a basis for developing good work habits. Work squads complete improvement projects on the facility's grounds and perform community service work projects when requested.

COMMUNITY PHASE II

Director of Special Supervision: Andrew Doom
Capacity: 100

Day-Reporting Center Address:
2375 University Avenue West, Suite 110
St. Paul, Minnesota 55114-1603
Phone: 651/523-7152

Following completion of the institution phase of CIP and with the approval of the Hearings and Release Unit, offenders are required to participate in the community-based Phase II for a minimum of six months.

Ninety days prior to an offender's projected Phase I completion date, the assigned CIP agent reviews the offender's status. Offenders graduate to Phase II only after successful completion of Phase I and development of an appropriate release plan.

In the seven-county Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area, Phase II offenders must report to a day-reporting center in St. Paul. In nonmetropolitan areas, offenders are held accountable for Phase II supervision requirements by CIP agents in intensive supervision units located throughout outstate Minnesota.

Phase II programming requires that offenders continue to maintain a high level of positive activity. Strict accountability is mandated. Offenders are expected to contact CIP staff daily, submit to random drug and/or alcohol tests, maintain full-time employment, and abide by curfews assigned by the CIP agent. They are also placed on electronic monitoring.

While on Phases II and III, offenders have not reached their supervised release dates. If they violate the conditions of the written agreements which permit them to participate in Phases II and III, they are subject to revocation procedures. Sanctions that may be imposed range from more restrictive supervision to termination from CIP and return to prison.

Phase II Goals
  • To facilitate a positive, productive reintegration into the community.
  • To provide a high level of supervision and surveillance that will hold the offender accountable and reduce the risk to public safety.
  • To continue critical thinking skills training and other programming begun during Phase I.
  • To ensure that the offender is employed and maintains employment.
  • To assist the offender in maintaining a chemical-free lifestyle.
Phase II Programs

Program components include:

Daily contact - As legislatively mandated, offenders are expected to have daily contact with CIP staff.

Random drug and alcohol testing - Offenders are expected to submit to random drug and alcohol tests as directed by CIP staff. Revocation procedures begin if there are positive test results.

Work/vocational programs - Offenders are expected to secure and maintain full-time employment or be involved in full-time vocational training.

Biweekly group sessions - When offered, offenders may be required to attend biweekly group meetings directed by CIP staff. Problems are discussed with the group, and offenders maintain written journals documenting their discussions.

Critical thinking skills - When offered, offenders may participate in weekly group sessions that utilize critical thinking skills training in analyzing and solving their problems.

Chemical dependency counseling - Chemical dependency counseling is continued in Phase II. Weekly AA group participation is closely monitored by CIP staff. Offenders may be required to attend chemical dependency group sessions at the day-reporting center or at programs offered in the community.

Physical training - Offenders are encouraged to continue physical training experienced in Phase I.

Weekly schedules - Offenders submit a weekly schedule that must be approved by the CIP agent. Random and unannounced contacts and phone calls are made to ensure schedule compliance.

PHASE III

Upon Phase II completion, the offender moves to Phase III. This is the last phase of the CIP program. In Phase III, the offender is expected to practice what he or she has learned in Phases I and II. The appropriate level of supervision is maintained by the CIP agent to maximize the offender's chances of success.

Phase III lasts until the offender is recommended for transfer to supervised release. This generally occurs after six months on Phase III, with the approval of the department's Hearings and Release Unit.

When offenders are placed on regular supervised release after successfully completing all phases of CIP, they are considered to be graduates of the program. They remain on supervised release until expiration of their sentence.

Last edited by Peter Haugen; 09-20-2004 at 12:50 PM.. Reason: Edit for picture
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Old 09-20-2004, 09:06 PM
Inside Out Inside Out is offline
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My husband is a proud graduate of the CIP boot camp. It is a tough program and not everyone makes it but for those who are willing to put in the effort it takes a lot of time off behind bars.

There is a long waiting list for those who want to go to boot camp now. This year the women were also moved to a new site (Thistledew) which freed up more beds for the men.
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Old 09-20-2004, 09:13 PM
FrozenInMinn FrozenInMinn is offline
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Tell your husband congats from me. I know it is a hard program. While i was in Moose Lake i saw a lot of people come back program failures, and we never got to see the ones to suceed. So a big thumbs up from me....


Peter
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Old 09-21-2004, 06:50 AM
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I'll be sure to tell him Peter. Thanks. He was one of the older guys in his squad. (45yr) A lot of being able to get through the program is attitude. While phase one is tough...phase two can be trying also. At first he was on a home monitoring device and basically couldn't leave the house except for work. He was lucky to find work very fast. We had agents coming to the house at least twice a week. I was very impressed with the supervising agents as they really took great effort in doing their part so that this would be a success story.

Of all the guys who started in his Charley Squad there are only two who have not had to go back and do some time. That is the sad reality.
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Old 09-21-2004, 06:58 AM
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Is this considered an 'early release program'? Someone told me to look into an 'early release program' but I was unsure what the difference was, if any, and while my husband would not be eligible for this program, there must be other options. We should make a sticky of the program options, because ICWC and CIP aren't the only ones, are they?
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Old 09-21-2004, 07:12 AM
Inside Out Inside Out is offline
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Here is how the time worked out. My husband was sentenced to 86 months which is actually 56 months. He went to St Cloud and then to Moose Lake for a total of 9 months. That brought his time down to 48 months which made him eligible for bootcamp. He went to Willow River for 6 months for phase 1 and was able to come for phase 2 after serving 15 months of what was an 86 month sentence. One thing about this program is that if you mess up during any part of the three phases none of the time you spent in the program counts as time served. My husband still is on probation until 2006.
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Old 09-21-2004, 09:06 AM
FrozenInMinn FrozenInMinn is offline
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Bootcamp is a great program and like Inside out said, if an inmate screws up during any part of that time, none of that time will count towards their sentence, so they will have to go back and start over from day 0 with whatever time they were sentenced to.
I know that there are some inmates currently appealing this decision stating that the initial six months in bootcamp should count towards their sentence but i haven't heard if there has been a decision made yet. I will try to get that information from Warden Carlson.
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Old 10-09-2004, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inside Out
Here is how the time worked out. My husband was sentenced to 86 months which is actually 56 months. He went to St Cloud and then to Moose Lake for a total of 9 months. That brought his time down to 48 months which made him eligible for bootcamp. He went to Willow River for 6 months for phase 1 and was able to come for phase 2 after serving 15 months of what was an 86 month sentence. One thing about this program is that if you mess up during any part of the three phases none of the time you spent in the program counts as time served. My husband still is on probation until 2006.
do you know anything else about the boot camp from start to finish because id lke to learn about it since im eligible? you can post here or pm me and thank you ahead of time.
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Old 10-09-2004, 10:06 PM
EddysWife EddysWife is offline
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That's what I thought....that an inmate would qualify at 48 months til SRD, not 18 months. I was confused there for a bit, because Eddy told me he would in theory be boot camp eligible in about 2 years....however he thinks he's got too many priors (no violent or sex crimes or anything like that, just a 3rd degree burglary and varying 5th degree substance crimes and one 4th degree). But at any rate I think he told me you can only have 3 or 4 prior convictions. Not sure about that though.
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Old 10-09-2004, 10:13 PM
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Originally Posted by EddysWife
That's what I thought....that an inmate would qualify at 48 months til SRD, not 18 months. I was confused there for a bit, because Eddy told me he would in theory be boot camp eligible in about 2 years....however he thinks he's got too many priors (no violent or sex crimes or anything like that, just a 3rd degree burglary and varying 5th degree substance crimes and one 4th degree). But at any rate I think he told me you can only have 3 or 4 prior convictions. Not sure about that though.
do you know what happens when you arrive, what type of clothing, and what the routine is? thank you
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Old 10-10-2004, 09:27 AM
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My husband graduated in 2000, so a few things may have changed. One that I know of is that the women are no longer at Willow River. There were women graduates when he was there.

First the biggest challenge is going to be getting in. So many are now qualified because of the high number of drug convictions. The criteria to meet are less than 48 months and no violent offenses. A friend of ours has applied and said that there are over 200 guys with names on the list at this time. What they have had to do is basically these guys throw their name in and a small percentage will get their name chosen. One thing to remember is that this facility only has a capacity of about 90. There are 5 squads going through at a time, with one graduating at a time. You will be a "red" hat when you enter and move to brown hat and then blue hat before you graduate. Each is symbolic of earned privledges.

The first day of bootcamp is quite a wake up call. Their will be instructors shouting in your face just like the military. You will be wise to learn "yes sir" "no sir" immediately. You will get your military style haircut and will be given Khaki clothes to wear. Red hats are not able to have visits, phone calls, write letters or watch TV. You will sleep in a barracks with about 30 guys. You will be responsible for making your bed and keeping your locker clean and doing your laundry.

The day starts at 5:30 am each morning. Depending on the day of the week you may be running for an hour or it may be inspection day and you'll be checked out thoroughly. Your belt buckle must sparkle and shoes must shine. You will do aerobics, or run 6 days a week. When you get to brown hat you will alternate with the weight room. You will also practice your march and cadence just about everyday. Push-ups are given as a disciplinary action, and some just give them for pleasure (according to my husband).

You will be required to work. There is lots of lumber cut by the bootcamp as it is a forestry area. Every hour of the day is planned and you will be tired. I've talked with many who have gone through the program and they all say the same thing......I'm tired. The food is good. Nutricious, healthy and plenty of it. Lights out are at 9:30.

The visits were 2 hours long and you are eligible when you become a brown hat. They are a specific time and were ok. Camera's were allowed at graduation but I don't think pictures can be taken at any other time.

Hope this info helps.
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Old 10-10-2004, 10:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inside Out
My husband graduated in 2000, so a few things may have changed. One that I know of is that the women are no longer at Willow River. There were women graduates when he was there.

First the biggest challenge is going to be getting in. So many are now qualified because of the high number of drug convictions. The criteria to meet are less than 48 months and no violent offenses. A friend of ours has applied and said that there are over 200 guys with names on the list at this time. What they have had to do is basically these guys throw their name in and a small percentage will get their name chosen. One thing to remember is that this facility only has a capacity of about 90. There are 5 squads going through at a time, with one graduating at a time. You will be a "red" hat when you enter and move to brown hat and then blue hat before you graduate. Each is symbolic of earned privledges.

The first day of bootcamp is quite a wake up call. Their will be instructors shouting in your face just like the military. You will be wise to learn "yes sir" "no sir" immediately. You will get your military style haircut and will be given Khaki clothes to wear. Red hats are not able to have visits, phone calls, write letters or watch TV. You will sleep in a barracks with about 30 guys. You will be responsible for making your bed and keeping your locker clean and doing your laundry.

The day starts at 5:30 am each morning. Depending on the day of the week you may be running for an hour or it may be inspection day and you'll be checked out thoroughly. Your belt buckle must sparkle and shoes must shine. You will do aerobics, or run 6 days a week. When you get to brown hat you will alternate with the weight room. You will also practice your march and cadence just about everyday. Push-ups are given as a disciplinary action, and some just give them for pleasure (according to my husband).

You will be required to work. There is lots of lumber cut by the bootcamp as it is a forestry area. Every hour of the day is planned and you will be tired. I've talked with many who have gone through the program and they all say the same thing......I'm tired. The food is good. Nutricious, healthy and plenty of it. Lights out are at 9:30.

The visits were 2 hours long and you are eligible when you become a brown hat. They are a specific time and were ok. Camera's were allowed at graduation but I don't think pictures can be taken at any other time.

Hope this info helps.
thank you and this does help but have more questions. one squad graduates and then another squad start enters to replace the squad that graduated? how to you get transported to boot camp and do you wear shackles? is it a similiar rutine that you go through like jail,or prison when you arrive? how long for red hat? do i keep any of the issued clothing from prison?
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Old 10-10-2004, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inside Out
My husband graduated in 2000, so a few things may have changed. One that I know of is that the women are no longer at Willow River. There were women graduates when he was there.

First the biggest challenge is going to be getting in. So many are now qualified because of the high number of drug convictions. The criteria to meet are less than 48 months and no violent offenses. A friend of ours has applied and said that there are over 200 guys with names on the list at this time. What they have had to do is basically these guys throw their name in and a small percentage will get their name chosen. One thing to remember is that this facility only has a capacity of about 90. There are 5 squads going through at a time, with one graduating at a time. You will be a "red" hat when you enter and move to brown hat and then blue hat before you graduate. Each is symbolic of earned privledges.

The first day of bootcamp is quite a wake up call. Their will be instructors shouting in your face just like the military. You will be wise to learn "yes sir" "no sir" immediately. You will get your military style haircut and will be given Khaki clothes to wear. Red hats are not able to have visits, phone calls, write letters or watch TV. You will sleep in a barracks with about 30 guys. You will be responsible for making your bed and keeping your locker clean and doing your laundry.

The day starts at 5:30 am each morning. Depending on the day of the week you may be running for an hour or it may be inspection day and you'll be checked out thoroughly. Your belt buckle must sparkle and shoes must shine. You will do aerobics, or run 6 days a week. When you get to brown hat you will alternate with the weight room. You will also practice your march and cadence just about everyday. Push-ups are given as a disciplinary action, and some just give them for pleasure (according to my husband).

You will be required to work. There is lots of lumber cut by the bootcamp as it is a forestry area. Every hour of the day is planned and you will be tired. I've talked with many who have gone through the program and they all say the same thing......I'm tired. The food is good. Nutricious, healthy and plenty of it. Lights out are at 9:30.

The visits were 2 hours long and you are eligible when you become a brown hat. They are a specific time and were ok. Camera's were allowed at graduation but I don't think pictures can be taken at any other time.

Hope this info helps.
what is cadence and are push ups the only thing for disciplinary action? do you get searched,deloused,showered out before the uniform and haircut? are we issued night clothes or do we just sleep in our underclothes that are issued? we sleep on cots or bunk beds? what type of aerobics do they do? do you know what the schedule is from time to time? do you mean the visits were okay?
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Old 10-11-2004, 09:28 AM
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As far as the squads go they are designed that you are a "hat" color for two months. Red hat for the first two and then go to brown etc. This however can change if you aren't meeting the goals. You can be held back...and some do. Push ups are given as disciplinary for things like not saying "yes sir", an unmade bed etc. There are other things that can get you kicked out of the program and back to prison such as fighting, drug use, etc.

I believe all bootcamp enrollee's are transferred from Moose Lake. You will take a State bus or van depending on the number going. I believe you are cuffed but can't remember about the shackles for this transfer. The graduations use to be on Mondays with new recruits coming in on Tuesday. I heard this changed and now the grads go out and the new guys come in on the same day.

The aerobics that are done were from a Reebok Step video. Most of the people leaving bootcamp come out in better physical shape than they have ever been. You get to take the video home. If you put on a few pounds in prison before you get here most likely you will lose it here. Cadence is the little tune the marchers sing while marching...like one two, three, four..... blah blah blah.

The visits were ok at bootcamp. The staff was very friendly and atmosphere was nice. I felt comfortable bringing my children.
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Old 10-11-2004, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Inside Out
As far as the squads go they are designed that you are a "hat" color for two months. Red hat for the first two and then go to brown etc. This however can change if you aren't meeting the goals. You can be held back...and some do. Push ups are given as disciplinary for things like not saying "yes sir", an unmade bed etc. There are other things that can get you kicked out of the program and back to prison such as fighting, drug use, etc.

I believe all bootcamp enrollee's are transferred from Moose Lake. You will take a State bus or van depending on the number going. I believe you are cuffed but can't remember about the shackles for this transfer. The graduations use to be on Mondays with new recruits coming in on Tuesday. I heard this changed and now the grads go out and the new guys come in on the same day.

The aerobics that are done were from a Reebok Step video. Most of the people leaving bootcamp come out in better physical shape than they have ever been. You get to take the video home. If you put on a few pounds in prison before you get here most likely you will lose it here. Cadence is the little tune the marchers sing while marching...like one two, three, four..... blah blah blah.

The visits were ok at bootcamp. The staff was very friendly and atmosphere was nice. I felt comfortable bringing my children.
am i only allowed what they issue for clothing/footwear? what else can i have there? is it all male staff? what type of nutrious food to you get? what made the visits okay? glad it made it comfortable to bring the kids.
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Old 10-12-2004, 07:26 AM
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The answer to the clothing/footwear issue is yes. You are in prison so you will wear what they give you. No clothing can be brought from home or anywhere else. I believe the only things you can have are prescription glasses, a watch and 3 photos..not polaroid. The staff are both male and female. The food that is served is cooked by inmates with Kitchen duty. Some of the food is actually grown at the camp. The menu is planned by a nutritionist so there is little sugar, fat, sodium etc. Expect to eat fish, skinless chicken etc. You won't see a greasy hamburger for the whole six months.

Visits were ok as the visiting room was smaller with less people than say like Moose Lake. There is a table between the inmate and visitor and it is also a scheduled time. It was a few hour drive for me so I had to plan the day and make sure I wasn't late or I would not be allowed in.

Hope this helps you. Are you definitely going to prison and if so when? Have you been convicted and are awaiting sentencing?
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Old 10-12-2004, 07:41 AM
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The answer to the clothing/footwear issue is yes. You are in prison so you will wear what they give you. No clothing can be brought from home or anywhere else. I believe the only things you can have are prescription glasses, a watch and 3 photos..not polaroid. The staff are both male and female. The food that is served is cooked by inmates with Kitchen duty. Some of the food is actually grown at the camp. The menu is planned by a nutritionist so there is little sugar, fat, sodium etc. Expect to eat fish, skinless chicken etc. You won't see a greasy hamburger for the whole six months.

Visits were ok as the visiting room was smaller with less people than say like Moose Lake. There is a table between the inmate and visitor and it is also a scheduled time. It was a few hour drive for me so I had to plan the day and make sure I wasn't late or I would not be allowed in.

Hope this helps you. Are you definitely going to prison and if so when? Have you been convicted and are awaiting sentencing?
yes this helps and yes im going to prison in spring of 2005. im waiting to see if the sentece gets imposed on what time i serve. do you have to eat what they put on your plate? what happens if theres a funeral in the family?
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Old 10-14-2004, 09:46 AM
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You can either eat what's on your plate or throw it.
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Old 09-29-2005, 12:25 AM
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My Fiance just graduated from CIP in August. Mostly everything she says still goes. Answer to your ? though you do have to eat every piece of food you take including butter packets. My guy learned that the hard way. You do take your steel toe boots home when your 1st phase is through and your hats and belts. Just remember this is military all the way. Your boots must be shined every day to absolute perfection so must your belt buckle. Your beds must be made with 90 degree corners and if you don't do it right you do it all day. Push ups aren't all you do. You do the leg raises (both raised a certain # of inches off the ground) for 30 minutes or more. You can be stuck sitting on the wall for same amounts of time. Its whatever your told. I honestly believe it was the best thing for my fiance. He will completely admit it was the hardest thing he has ever gone through in his entire life. 1000 times harder than prison but he is a completely changed person because of it and i'm very proud of him. So if you are willing to deal with all that to get out early. I'd say go for it!!!!
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Old 05-18-2017, 08:01 AM
Twright1 Twright1 is offline
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I noticed that these are older post. Does anyone have any new information on the boot camp? I'm wondering how the time goes after the six months are they transferred to another facility and on house arrest or do they get to go home?
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Old 05-18-2017, 08:01 AM
Twright1 Twright1 is offline
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Originally Posted by ria8 View Post
My Fiance just graduated from CIP in August. Mostly everything she says still goes. Answer to your ? though you do have to eat every piece of food you take including butter packets. My guy learned that the hard way. You do take your steel toe boots home when your 1st phase is through and your hats and belts. Just remember this is military all the way. Your boots must be shined every day to absolute perfection so must your belt buckle. Your beds must be made with 90 degree corners and if you don't do it right you do it all day. Push ups aren't all you do. You do the leg raises (both raised a certain # of inches off the ground) for 30 minutes or more. You can be stuck sitting on the wall for same amounts of time. Its whatever your told. I honestly believe it was the best thing for my fiance. He will completely admit it was the hardest thing he has ever gone through in his entire life. 1000 times harder than prison but he is a completely changed person because of it and i'm very proud of him. So if you are willing to deal with all that to get out early. I'd say go for it!!!!

I noticed that these are older post. Does anyone have any new information on the boot camp? I'm wondering how the time goes after the six months are they transferred to another facility and on house arrest or do they get to go home?
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Old 05-18-2017, 08:02 AM
Twright1 Twright1 is offline
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My husband graduated in 2000, so a few things may have changed. One that I know of is that the women are no longer at Willow River. There were women graduates when he was there.

First the biggest challenge is going to be getting in. So many are now qualified because of the high number of drug convictions. The criteria to meet are less than 48 months and no violent offenses. A friend of ours has applied and said that there are over 200 guys with names on the list at this time. What they have had to do is basically these guys throw their name in and a small percentage will get their name chosen. One thing to remember is that this facility only has a capacity of about 90. There are 5 squads going through at a time, with one graduating at a time. You will be a "red" hat when you enter and move to brown hat and then blue hat before you graduate. Each is symbolic of earned privledges.


The first day of bootcamp is quite a wake up call. Their will be instructors shouting in your face just like the military. You will be wise to learn "yes sir" "no sir" immediately. You will get your military style haircut and will be given Khaki clothes to wear. Red hats are not able to have visits, phone calls, write letters or watch TV. You will sleep in a barracks with about 30 guys. You will be responsible for making your bed and keeping your locker clean and doing your laundry.

The day starts at 5:30 am each morning. Depending on the day of the week you may be running for an hour or it may be inspection day and you'll be checked out thoroughly. Your belt buckle must sparkle and shoes must shine. You will do aerobics, or run 6 days a week. When you get to brown hat you will alternate with the weight room. You will also practice your march and cadence just about everyday. Push-ups are given as a disciplinary action, and some just give them for pleasure (according to my husband).

You will be required to work. There is lots of lumber cut by the bootcamp as it is a forestry area. Every hour of the day is planned and you will be tired. I've talked with many who have gone through the program and they all say the same thing......I'm tired. The food is good. Nutricious, healthy and plenty of it. Lights out are at 9:30.

The visits were 2 hours long and you are eligible when you become a brown hat. They are a specific time and were ok. Camera's were allowed at graduation but I don't think pictures can be taken at any other time.

Hope this info helps.
I noticed that these are older post. Does anyone have any new information on the boot camp? I'm wondering how the time goes after the six months are they transferred to another facility and on house arrest or do they get to go home?
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Old 08-28-2017, 01:35 AM
Luckybeast31 Luckybeast31 is offline
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Hello I'm new to this... My boyfriend is in prison he got 5 years which is 60 months.. you do 3 out of that 5 years so does he have to wait for the 60 months to go down to 48 to be accepted into bootcamp or does it go by the 3 years he is doing... And also his charge is assault is he still eligible for bootcamp by chance at all.. what do you have to do to get accepted I have heard that you have to keep appyling and I also heard there is a litter my boyfriend can write to bootcamp to get accepted please tell me someone had answers for me
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