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Washington General Prison Talk, News, Introductions & Chit Chat Topics & Discussions relating to Prison & the Criminal Justice System in Washington that do not fit into any other Washington sub-forum category. Please feel free to also introduce yourself to other members in the state and talk about whatever topics come to mind that may not have anything to do with prison.

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Old 12-08-2019, 02:55 PM
WAstate WAstate is offline
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Default Curious about inmate $$ and how it transfers

I very likely will be entering a plea deal in Clark County WA ( Vancouver )

Yes I know Shelton WA is the transfer location after county jail.

My incarceration should be approx 18 months or so ( I am near 60yo with 0 arrests prior to this fiasco )

The state has already civil forfeiture a vehicle and cash in my pocket at arrest 3 yrs ago. So I absolutely will not allow them a chance to gain another nickel from me by witholding a % of any money my sister sends me or I deposit into a Jpay account or whatever.

I can survive 18 months without twinkies or toothpaste ( its the principle to me now )

if I show up to Clark Co jail after court sentencing and have $200-300 in my pocket ( just an example )

1. Will that apply to a Clark county jail account in full while I await xfer to WCC in Shelton and then onto permanent facility approx 2-3 months later?


thank you in advance

Last edited by WAstate; 12-08-2019 at 03:52 PM..
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Old 12-08-2019, 04:46 PM
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Do you owe restitution or fines imposed by your sentencing judge? If so, here's what the Washington Legislature says about crimes committed after 1985.
https://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=9.94A.753

and what the WA ACLU says about it.
https://www.aclu-wa.org/questions-an...ligations-lfos

There have been WA court cases that cancel restitution/fine orders after they have been in force for 10 years.
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Old 12-08-2019, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fbopnomore View Post
Do you owe restitution or fines imposed by your sentencing judge? If so, here's what the Washington Legislature says about crimes committed after 1985.

and what the WA ACLU says about it.

There have been WA court cases that cancel restitution/fine orders after they have been in force for 10 years.
No

The vehicle and funds were assett forfeiture due to being used in the commission of a felony.

There should be no financial punishment handed down in court as it was not a financial crime.

__________________________________

I was just skimming the PT site here and saw how the state and prisons and such helped themselves to various % fees of funds that family members wished to give to their incarcerated loved ones.

Yea I would love to have funds to make my time more comfortable ... but I will do without if a % portion i deem unjust is stolen by the courts or prison system
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Old 12-08-2019, 05:10 PM
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Many prison systems force collection of money owed to the government when they are documented by the sentencing judge. I'm not familiar with Washington DOC's policy, but the federal prison system has a "voluntary" inmate financial responsibility program that carries serious punishments if you "fail to volunteer". They not only take money from the inmate's commissary/phone account for amounts designated by the judge, but also for anything else they can find, including child support.
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Old 12-09-2019, 06:56 AM
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If you are found or plead guilty, the courts will likely fine you and that fine can be taken from your commissary account. However, they take a pittance (1% of next to nothing is still next to nothing) AND the court fines do not accrue interest until after you've been out for some period of time (6 months? not certain on that). So it's best to let the fines sit until after you're out.

Oregon recently started up a "savings account" that is mandatory, where they take a small amount out of each inmates commissary account and give it back to them when they release - the idea is that the inmate has some money upon release to work with. I haven't seen how this plays out yet, but am guessing that the amount they hold is not enough for 1 months' rent. I don't know if Washington is doing the same yet or not.

As for buying toothbrushes, etc., I strongly recommend you maintain your personal hygiene. That many guys crammed into that small an area means that illnesses roar through prisons. Please take care of your self.
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Old 12-09-2019, 12:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GingerM View Post
If you are found or plead guilty, the courts will likely fine you and that fine can be taken from your commissary account. However, they take a pittance (1% of next to nothing is still next to nothing) AND the court fines do not accrue interest until after you've been out for some period of time (6 months? not certain on that). So it's best to let the fines sit until after you're out.

Oregon recently started up a "savings account" that is mandatory, where they take a small amount out of each inmates commissary account and give it back to them when they release - the idea is that the inmate has some money upon release to work with. I haven't seen how this plays out yet, but am guessing that the amount they hold is not enough for 1 months' rent. I don't know if Washington is doing the same yet or not.

As for buying toothbrushes, etc., I strongly recommend you maintain your personal hygiene. That many guys crammed into that small an area means that illnesses roar through prisons. Please take care of your self.
Yes I completely understand the hygiene issue

Can cash in my pocket be applied to an online jail account ?
or is that something they do not allow at 'booking' ?
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Old 12-09-2019, 02:12 PM
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Here's what Washington DOC says about sending money to inmates.
https://www.doc.wa.gov/corrections/i...send/money.htm

There is also a link explaining "Mandatory Deductions".
When funds are received they are subject to mandatory deductions as required by RCW 72.09.480 , unless exempt (i.e, funds specifically designated for postage, education or qualified medical expenses). See the Deduction Matrix (Attachment 2)Adobe PDF document file for detailed information about deductions and exemptions on deposits into an inmate's trust account.
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Old 12-10-2019, 06:41 AM
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Cash in your pocket will be considered "personal property" when you self-surrender. Unfortunately, there isn't really a way for you to put money on your own books prior to self-surrender because you won't be an inmate yet.

Personal property will be picked up by whomever you request to pick it up after you've self-surrendered.

Do you have anyone who has Power of Attorney for you? Is there anyone you trust enough to give them PoA? This will be pretty important as time goes by.
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Old 12-11-2019, 10:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GingerM View Post
Cash in your pocket will be considered "personal property" when you self-surrender. Unfortunately, there isn't really a way for you to put money on your own books prior to self-surrender because you won't be an inmate yet.

Personal property will be picked up by whomever you request to pick it up after you've self-surrendered.

Do you have anyone who has Power of Attorney for you? Is there anyone you trust enough to give them PoA? This will be pretty important as time goes by.
My 'personal property' does not follow me ?

1. what clothes am I wearing when released 18 months or so later if my 'personal property' does not follow me ?

2. So I cannot have a house key and a drivers license and a credit card as my 'personal property' that is returned to me on the day of my release ?

I understand the part of not being able to deposit any cash into my own account at the time of my surrender / court date.
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Old 12-11-2019, 10:51 AM
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In Washington, you can get quarterly packages sent in by family members that contain food and hygiene items. I think this is through Access SecurePak but you will need to check that. You can also put money directly on music and mail through Jpay.
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Old 12-11-2019, 10:51 AM
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I don't know how Washington State deals with released prisoners. I hope you receive answers from folks who have actually completed their prison sentences there.

In federal prison, any "property" you arrive with, including your clothes, must be either mailed home, or "donated", probably to the trash dumpster. The only "property" that will be released at your last meeting with R&D, (receiving and discharge) will be determined by the CO who will decide which "commissary purchased" goods you can take with you to the street, and which you must forfeit.

You will have your prison photo ID and a debit card loaded with the remaining balance from your inmate account. Only those prisoners who meet the bop's strict definition of "indigence" are eligible for "gate money".

Families can send release clothing to the bop counselor, but if not, R&D will provide something that you can wear.
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Old 12-12-2019, 06:16 AM
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Quote:
My 'personal property' does not follow me ?

1. what clothes am I wearing when released 18 months or so later if my 'personal property' does not follow me ?

2. So I cannot have a house key and a drivers license and a credit card as my 'personal property' that is returned to me on the day of my release ?
Your personal property does not follow you - otherwise, people could bring in knives and drugs.

Clothing is supposed to be sent to you or brought to you by friends or family when you release. They will take your clothing when you surrender. You will first go to county jail, where they will outfit you in whatever their "inmate uniform" is. Then you will transfer to state, where they will take the county clothing and send it back to the county, and outfit you with the prison uniform. Clothing will initially be provided by the prison, but your friends/family can send you extra clothing.

You will not be allowed to have anything metal at all. No car keys, no house keys, no razors, no... anything at all metal. You won't be allowed to have a credit card either, also for safety reasons, but honestly, you wouldn't have a way of using it anyway. No drivers license either, due to flight risk and the fact that most driver's licenses can be used as weapons.

Basically, figure that anything you go in with you will never see again unless you've got close family willing to come get your personal belongings from county and store them for you. There will be forms to fill out saying what your person is picking up and they will have to sign off saying they picked it up. It's helpful if that person has durable Power of Attorney for you so they can fight with the jail if need be.

If no one can pick it up, they may be willing to ship it somewhere (at your expense). That varies depending on the county. You'll travel from county to state with nothing more than the clothing they gave you in county, which will be shipped back to county.

I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but I'd rather you go into this knowing what to expect than be shocked when it happens.
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Old 12-12-2019, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
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Your personal property does not follow you - otherwise, people could bring in knives and drugs.

Clothing is supposed to be sent to you or brought to you by friends or family when you release. They will take your clothing when you surrender. You will first go to county jail, where they will outfit you in whatever their "inmate uniform" is. Then you will transfer to state, where they will take the county clothing and send it back to the county, and outfit you with the prison uniform. Clothing will initially be provided by the prison, but your friends/family can send you extra clothing.

You will not be allowed to have anything metal at all. No car keys, no house keys, no razors, no... anything at all metal. You won't be allowed to have a credit card either, also for safety reasons, but honestly, you wouldn't have a way of using it anyway. No drivers license either, due to flight risk and the fact that most driver's licenses can be used as weapons.

Basically, figure that anything you go in with you will never see again unless you've got close family willing to come get your personal belongings from county and store them for you. There will be forms to fill out saying what your person is picking up and they will have to sign off saying they picked it up. It's helpful if that person has durable Power of Attorney for you so they can fight with the jail if need be.

If no one can pick it up, they may be willing to ship it somewhere (at your expense). That varies depending on the county. You'll travel from county to state with nothing more than the clothing they gave you in county, which will be shipped back to county.

I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but I'd rather you go into this knowing what to expect than be shocked when it happens.
I would hope that you can keep your eye glasses.
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Old 12-13-2019, 06:31 AM
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Yes, you can keep your eyeglasses. Under certain circumstances, you may be able to keep your shoes (if they're orthotic and you got them through a doctor).
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Old 12-15-2019, 12:15 PM
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No personal property will follow you except glasses and wedding band. Clark County will eventually dispose of it if you donít designate someone to pick it up.

There is a mandatory $500 fine and others can be added. DOC takes 10% of whatever money you make and will apply it towards this. The other two deductions are 10% for DOC debt and 20% towards inmate savings. You will get the inmate savings upon release.

If no one picks you up or you donít go to work release, youíll release in the tan prison uniform if they canít get you normal release clothes.

Finally, if you do end up in prison, just accept it. Being angry and fighting the system does nothing but make you and everyone around you miserable.
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