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  #201  
Old 06-01-2019, 03:15 PM
Bikerguy Bikerguy is offline
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Originally Posted by Sarianna View Post
I'm planning a visit for late this year and will be flying in from Europe. My biggest fear for the whole trip is that some random 'dress code' which has never been enforced before will be applied at the prison and I'll be turned away...in other words a CO will just not like my face and that'll be the real reason I won't get in while they'll say it's my pants or shirt It shouldn't be this way and it's maddening how this is happening frequently. Reminds me of those bouncers on their power trip when we were going to bars in my youth: some people just enjoy showing 'who's the man' and turning people away just because they can
All I can say is call ahead of time to get clarification about dress code. Let them know that you are coming from out of the country. Also if there is a problem in the entrance with what you are wearing, respectfully inform the officers that you are from out of the country and this is your first visit etc. I know we have made exceptions if clothing is not completely in policy, as long as its not completely in left field and there is no attempt to even try and be in policy (clothes better seen in a club than a visiting room)
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  #202  
Old 06-01-2019, 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Junebug11 View Post
I am not a CO but I have been visiting my brother (6 yrs. my senior) off and on (mostly on) since I was a child as hes been locked up since his teens he starting off in boys homes I am now 36 so new needless to say I have more experience with the visiting process than the average person. When you said that we are all here for the same thing, to visit our loved ones who broke the laws of society, you are correct but the way I see it is our LOs broke the law not the visitors so why do I feel like the criminal when visiting?
Unfortunately we have many visitors who enter the room and instead of spending a few hours talking to their inmate and having lunch they try their hardest to circumvent the rules by conducting mutual fondling. What starts out as kissing turns into heavy petting and more, if we allow it to get that far.

Along with the sexual acts we try and prevent in the room. (its not fair for the kids in the room to look over and see a woman rubbing her man up) We are also trying to prevent the introduction of contraband. Its not just the girlfriends but the wives, parents and siblings that try and pass off drugs to the inmates in the visiting room. I've seen people put drugs into fake legs, inside bras, in a baby's diaper and even in other places.

We have to stay ever vigilant and I am sorry if this comes out as harsh, but everyone is a suspect. I have seen every "population" in a prison try and circumvent the rules by ether fondling or introducing drugs.
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  #203  
Old 06-03-2019, 09:51 PM
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I absolutely agree! But there's this thinking...

that permeates this culture. I don't see it as much with younger incarcerated and staff, but there's a generation of folks who definitely have it ingrained. But as you said-- we're on the outside, it's not our place to define anymore than it would be mine to define another person's sexual orientation or gender.

Reminds me of "lady doctor". I still shudder when I hear it. It wasn't untrue-- they are women and they are doctors, but the title was meant to denote inequality as defined by outsiders. *sigh* Language, eh?
I know what you mean about the "lady doctor". When I first started working as a paralegal in this county, it was 1984. The attorney I worked for as an older gentleman who had been around since the 50s. His dictation to the one female attorney in the county in 1984 throughout the day she retired in 1991, "send a letter to that female type attorney". Of course, by 1991, there were several attorneys who happened to be women, but that one who had dared start her practice in our county in the late 60s, was always the one he meant when he used that phrase. It was like it pained him to have to call her an attorney. He never acknowledged this attorney's accomplishments:

She was born in 1916, had skipped several grades in school, got a BA from ASU in journalism in 1936, post-grad at Northwestern University, was a newspaper publisher and editor, a realtor, in 1962 started law school at U of A, working fulltime (ranch, publishing, and realtor) and raising a family for 6 years - until she got her law degree in 1968, after which she opened her practice. She passed away at age 90.
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  #204  
Old 06-03-2019, 10:28 PM
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Default Dress Code and Visitation Guards

In AZ state prisons, the private ones allowed us to change. The State run ones, no changing - you don't pass the CO's perception of the rules, you don't get in that day at all.

AZ has their policies and orders online, but they are very much open to interpretation and the variances change from prison to prison and guard to guard. Different people over the past 7 years have created FB pages for our different prisons and we try and share that info - what guards may be pickier about or what rules they seem more intent on enforcing, along with anything that may cause the metal detectors to go off such as the hooks on a bra (it's not just the underwire). Food visits and what is allowed, along with what to wear are the topics that are most often brought up by newbies. I know my first time at each prison, it was what worried me. And, like others, the same outfit passed one visit but not the next visit.

A few times, I have experienced COs who seemed to seek reasons to be rude, but, most of my 7 years visiting, the COs were professional and often even pleasant. When my son was at the opposite end of the state, they started to recognize me as they knew how far I traveled (800 miles RT), along with dealing with the disability of not being able to use my arms/hands very well to put the change in the vending machine and that I couldn't open the door to get out the purchase. It varied from allowing my son to proceed or the officer doing it for me, depending on whether it was busy (often there was only a dozen visitors).

The last prison my son was transferred to a year ago, two of the COs had seen me at a concert and recognized me as a visitor. After that, they always asked if I had seen anything good lately. When I was picking up my son to bring him home (less than 2 weeks ago), one of those COs were headed into the next building for training and saw me waiting in the parking lot. He came over and asked if my son was being released. He wished me luck and told me my son was a good person, always respectful, never caused any problems, and he thought my son would be successful in never returning to prison. (Yes, it made me feel like a proud mom.)
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  #205  
Old 06-11-2019, 12:15 PM
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Question for you:

Have you seen many guys who have spent their lifetimes in and out of the prison system (let's say for non-violent and/or drug offenses) finally have the lightbulb come on and do a 180? Obviously you wouldn't see them each time, but knowing the backgrounds of the guys you're dealing with, I'm sure you'd be aware.

From the EMT branch of the family tree, thanks for all you do!
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  #206  
Old 06-12-2019, 10:08 PM
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Originally Posted by reg8 View Post
Question for you:

Have you seen many guys who have spent their lifetimes in and out of the prison system (let's say for non-violent and/or drug offenses) finally have the lightbulb come on and do a 180? Obviously you wouldn't see them each time, but knowing the backgrounds of the guys you're dealing with, I'm sure you'd be aware.

From the EMT branch of the family tree, thanks for all you do!
Ive met many folks who say they will go straight when they get out. That they have a job lined up etc. These are guys who are might be young in their 20s or guys in their 50s getting out after being locked up for 2 decades.

I don't really see what happens after they walk out the gates. I assume most go straight.....I hope against the odds that they do.
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  #207  
Old 06-29-2019, 03:49 AM
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We could certainly learn something from some of the European countries, especially the Scandinavian ones. They try to normalize the prison experience as much as possible and some prisons even have "cells" that are like apartments where you get your own key. Some prisoners are even allowed to visit their families on the weekends at the end of their sentences or go to their jobs and come back to prison each night. Their objective is to work towards getting the person back into mainstream society ASAP and to rehabilitate them to function in society. I think the warden at Solano SP in California toured their facility and is trying to make some changes along those lines. California is working hard to turn the experience into a "rehabilitative" one, but they still have far to go.


And of course, we continue to imprison people for far too long, whereas in some of those countries, the longest sentence some get is 10 years and that is for major crime. There are some people who they will never let out due to the nature of their crimes and the fact that they won't rehabilitate, but they still treat them like they are human beings and not like animals in cages. They state that if you treat a man like an animal, then he will be one.

It's interesting to note that they are CLOSING PRISONS DOWN, so obviously, they have hit upon something that works. It appears that we could sure learn something from them.

I can't even say how much I agree with this!!!

"And of course, we continue to imprison people for far too long, whereas in some of those countries, the longest sentence some get is 10 years and that is for major crime. There are some people who they will never let out due to the nature of their crimes and the fact that they won't rehabilitate, but they still treat them like they are human beings and not like animals in cages. They state that if you treat a man like an animal, then he will be one.

It's interesting to note that they are CLOSING PRISONS DOWN, so obviously, they have hit upon something that works. It appears that we could sure learn something from them."
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  #208  
Old 06-29-2019, 07:59 AM
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I can't even say how much I agree with this!!!

"And of course, we continue to imprison people for far too long, whereas in some of those countries, the longest sentence some get is 10 years and that is for major crime. There are some people who they will never let out due to the nature of their crimes and the fact that they won't rehabilitate, but they still treat them like they are human beings and not like animals in cages. They state that if you treat a man like an animal, then he will be one.

It's interesting to note that they are CLOSING PRISONS DOWN, so obviously, they have hit upon something that works. It appears that we could sure learn something from them."
It is a multi-layered problem that does not get enough attention. Though I would like to say that the overall prison population in the US has shrunk in the last few years also....very little, but it still has shrunk.

For me, and I am only one part (very small part) of the system I feel that to attack the issues we have to focus not just on prison reform, but on what gets young men into trouble to begin with and what we can do as a society to address that.

On the tail end we also need to better prepare those that exit prison and to also be more welcoming to those with felony convictions, especially when it comes to employment. You can't fault someone for crime when tthey cant go straight
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  #209  
Old 07-01-2019, 10:14 PM
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I know someone in prison and he said on his JPay he can look up his good days , release date, etc. He is eligible for Transitional control and saw today that it says his earliest TC date is 7-31-19. What exactly does that mean? Does it mean that's the day he will transfer to TC?

Also what is TC like? What's the process once they get there, what's the rules, how do they communicate with loved ones there? Once they complete their sentence and are released, are they completely free or do all inmates have to get on parole? Sorry for all the questions, this is my first experience with this
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  #210  
Old 07-02-2019, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by alicia.cole92 View Post
I know someone in prison and he said on his JPay he can look up his good days , release date, etc. He is eligible for Transitional control and saw today that it says his earliest TC date is 7-31-19. What exactly does that mean? Does it mean that's the day he will transfer to TC?

Also what is TC like? What's the process once they get there, what's the rules, how do they communicate with loved ones there? Once they complete their sentence and are released, are they completely free or do all inmates have to get on parole? Sorry for all the questions, this is my first experience with this
Alicia, welcome to Prison Talk. This thread that you are posting in is more about a Correctional Officer's point of view when it comes to the prison system and working with inmates...etc. If you tell us which prison your loved one is, or at least the state or whether it's a Federal prison, we can suggest a better forum for finding out some answers for you

HERE you will see all the regional forums that we have for each state & the feds.
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  #211  
Old 07-13-2019, 01:54 AM
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Hello everyone, and thank you Bikerguy for answering questions ! It helps much to understand the other side, especially for people like me who are penpal from overseas. I have already visited my friend twice these last years, but I cannot be there more often.

I would very much like to have your advice as a CO about violent offenders. It has been said that letters and mails may have a posivite impact on inmates. My question is, what would you advice to me as a penpal, in order to help my friend who obviously has troubles with authority ? I mean, he is in DR for years (but there are no longer executions in his State) because of horrible crimes, and as soon as he lives with other inmates (no more in the hole or in solitary confinment), he finally becomes violent again toward other inmates or COs. As many I guess, he has had a very harsh past, made of violence (family). With me, he is quite introverted but he looks caring and sweet, though. I try to support him and to lift him up as much as possible, so that he may stop being into conflits, but one quickly feels powerless only with pen and papers. He has no family visiting him and looks depressed.

From your experience with inmates as a CO, do you think that a penpal could have a positive impact on an inmate ? Is there a better way to answer him, when he says that he feels disrespected by COs ? And how are you dealing with violent inmates in your job ?

I hope I didn't make too many mistakes as I'm French and my English is a bit clumsy. Thank you very much for your attention.

Last edited by Oceane; 07-13-2019 at 01:58 AM..
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  #212  
Old 07-13-2019, 10:56 PM
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Red face Cancellation of approved parole question

CO, question for you please.
A prisoner has approved parole and date to leave prison. Three weeks before he leaves they cancel the whole deal because he has a breach in prison.

The crime: contacting partner with protection order in place many times by phone. The partner wanted contact.

Two questions.

1. Could they not have gone to him and said stop it, we know or else ?

2. Could they just have had it in for him (hated him) and waited intentionally until he was nearly out and think this is a guy who doesn't deserve to be out.

Just curious as to how things go down regarding breaches of this type.

Thanks in advance
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  #213  
Old 07-14-2019, 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by kleesi73 View Post
CO, question for you please.
A prisoner has approved parole and date to leave prison. Three weeks before he leaves they cancel the whole deal because he has a breach in prison.

The crime: contacting partner with protection order in place many times by phone. The partner wanted contact.

Two questions.

1. Could they not have gone to him and said stop it, we know or else ?

2. Could they just have had it in for him (hated him) and waited intentionally until he was nearly out and think this is a guy who doesn't deserve to be out.

Just curious as to how things go down regarding breaches of this type.

Thanks in advance
If there is a court ordered protection order in place and the inmate has been contacting that victiml then they have breached the court order. It doesnt matter if the victim wanted the contact the order is there for the protection of the victim and should not have been broken. Its not up to prison staff to tell him not to breach the protection order he is responsible.

If this domestic violence related? then the correct way to gain contact is for both parties to have DV counselling and anger management for the aggressor. Then the DV therapists will decide when contact should be allowed and the court order lifted. Its not up to the victim or abuser to decide the order should be broken. I hope that helps.
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  #214  
Old 07-14-2019, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by kleesi73 View Post
CO, question for you please.
A prisoner has approved parole and date to leave prison. Three weeks before he leaves they cancel the whole deal because he has a breach in prison.

The crime: contacting partner with protection order in place many times by phone. The partner wanted contact.

Two questions.

1. Could they not have gone to him and said stop it, we know or else ?

2. Could they just have had it in for him (hated him) and waited intentionally until he was nearly out and think this is a guy who doesn't deserve to be out.

Just curious as to how things go down regarding breaches of this type.

Thanks in advance
My guy knows someone who was out for less than 24 hrs for this reason. "Supposedly" just went to pick up his stuff from her. He was arrested right away and had to serve the rest of his sentence.

OP is because the person was their victim in someway shape or form. They are not even allowed 3rd party contact.

No one is out for them. They called on a recorded line and got caught violating their parole agreement.
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  #215  
Old 07-15-2019, 04:54 PM
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While I am no psychologist I will say that having a pen pal or any connection to the outside world is good for an inmate. Prison is it's own closed society and its a good reminder that there life outside the walls and that there is a different more grounded "normal" than life inside of the prison.

My advice is just try and get him to view things from different points of view. Sometimes guys that are locked up for a long time become institutionalized and their understanding of how things are is clouded by prison life.

Maybe having someone who is trusted giving them advice from a different point of view on how to cope with anger and frustrations would help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oceane View Post
Hello everyone, and thank you Bikerguy for answering questions ! It helps much to understand the other side, especially for people like me who are penpal from overseas. I have already visited my friend twice these last years, but I cannot be there more often.

I would very much like to have your advice as a CO about violent offenders. It has been said that letters and mails may have a posivite impact on inmates. My question is, what would you advice to me as a penpal, in order to help my friend who obviously has troubles with authority ? I mean, he is in DR for years (but there are no longer executions in his State) because of horrible crimes, and as soon as he lives with other inmates (no more in the hole or in solitary confinment), he finally becomes violent again toward other inmates or COs. As many I guess, he has had a very harsh past, made of violence (family). With me, he is quite introverted but he looks caring and sweet, though. I try to support him and to lift him up as much as possible, so that he may stop being into conflits, but one quickly feels powerless only with pen and papers. He has no family visiting him and looks depressed.

From your experience with inmates as a CO, do you think that a penpal could have a positive impact on an inmate ? Is there a better way to answer him, when he says that he feels disrespected by COs ? And how are you dealing with violent inmates in your job ?

I hope I didn't make too many mistakes as I'm French and my English is a bit clumsy. Thank you very much for your attention.
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  #216  
Old 07-15-2019, 05:08 PM
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You have said it yourself, he made the choice to contact someone in violation of a restraining order. The prison did not do that to him. He did it to himself. Regardless if the other party wanted the contact there is still a court order against it.

Contrary to what many inmates think, we are not "out to get them". We don't "have it in" for someone. It's not our job as COs to form an opinion if someone should be released or not. The Parole board decided he should be released, but he got in trouble.

Like most CO's I don't take anything personally while working inside. I am not going to target a random inmate just to pick on them because I don't like their race or their crime. I'm dealing with hundreds of inmates in a day and I just don't have the time to just pick on someone out of the blue.

Some inmates might feel that CO's pick on them and I can understand why. I will use an example from a few weeks ago. I did an on the spot correction on an inmate for a uniform violation. No big deal. just a simple "fix yourself". Well this young man did not like this and continued to wear his uniform improperly the next day and the next day. Well now he has my attention. If he just fixed himself the first time...it would not be a problem.

Well now that he has my attention I went to his cell to retrieve the altered uniform. I found something else in his cell that got him sent to SHU. If he had just fixed himself the first time I might not have dug deeper and found other more serious things that he was doing wrong. I am sure in his mind I was picking on him and singling him out. But in actuality his continued bad choices of ignoring me and having serious contraband in his cell got him in SHU.

But back to your story. could he have been warned? No. We take unauthorized contact with the public very seriously. It could be contact with the media, with a former spouse (on a restraining order) or with a child victim, Ive seen all of those and each and every time we deal with it harshly.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kleesi73 View Post
CO, question for you please.
A prisoner has approved parole and date to leave prison. Three weeks before he leaves they cancel the whole deal because he has a breach in prison.

The crime: contacting partner with protection order in place many times by phone. The partner wanted contact.

Two questions.

1. Could they not have gone to him and said stop it, we know or else ?

2. Could they just have had it in for him (hated him) and waited intentionally until he was nearly out and think this is a guy who doesn't deserve to be out.

Just curious as to how things go down regarding breaches of this type.

Thanks in advance
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  #217  
Old 07-15-2019, 05:15 PM
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Wink Breaching domestic violence order

Quote:
Originally Posted by maytayah View Post
If there is a court ordered protection order in place and the inmate has been contacting that victiml then they have breached the court order. It doesnt matter if the victim wanted the contact the order is there for the protection of the victim and should not have been broken. Its not up to prison staff to tell him not to breach the protection order he is responsible.

If this domestic violence related? then the correct way to gain contact is for both parties to have DV counselling and anger management for the aggressor. Then the DV therapists will decide when contact should be allowed and the court order lifted. Its not up to the victim or abuser to decide the order should be broken. I hope that helps.
thank you for your answer. I have come to the conclusion that this happened for a good reason. The correctional facility contacted a DV counselling service on my behalf (unbeknownst to me) and they have been counselling me for around 6wks now.
My partner has also been completing his classes in prison.
In Australia it helps if you have the police agree with the lifting of no contact order and I have spoken with them and they also agree that this is the correct procedure to get contact.
Aside from us now going through this process the proper way I can see through the "love fog" more clearly and realise that both of us really did require counselling and classes. I'm going to leave things as they are for a 3 month non-contact period then go back to court feeling far better about myself and my partner instead of applying right now as a knee jerk reaction.
It is far from over as my partner has to go into a rehab for a further 3 months for his issues if/when he gets re-approved for parole.
Rehab is not for drugs or alcohol. Rehab will be for anger issues and domestic violence.
It has been the time of actual "no contact" that I have actually seen more clearly what really needs to be done. Love is blind for sure.
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  #218  
Old 07-17-2019, 06:50 AM
sidewalker sidewalker is offline
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Biker guy....Im curious......you said ***It could be contact with the media***
So inmates are not allowed contact with the media?
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  #219  
Old 07-17-2019, 08:51 AM
Bikerguy Bikerguy is offline
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Biker guy....Im curious......you said ***It could be contact with the media***
So inmates are not allowed contact with the media?

Any contact with the media has to be approved through. Offical channels.

No calling the local radio station to do an interview with a contraband cell phone.
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Old 07-19-2019, 07:58 AM
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Thank you for you answer ! Your point of view was very interesting to me, as I wondered how I could help him to react differently the next time, without sounding judgemental. I keep thinking about this, waiting for his answer to know if he wants to talk about it again, and I'll softly try to make him see some other perspectives.



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While I am no psychologist I will say that having a pen pal or any connection to the outside world is good for an inmate. Prison is it's own closed society and its a good reminder that there life outside the walls and that there is a different more grounded "normal" than life inside of the prison.

My advice is just try and get him to view things from different points of view. Sometimes guys that are locked up for a long time become institutionalized and their understanding of how things are is clouded by prison life.

Maybe having someone who is trusted giving them advice from a different point of view on how to cope with anger and frustrations would help.
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Old 07-19-2019, 11:44 AM
Bikerguy Bikerguy is offline
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If an inmate is "angry at the world" he is not going to want to hear it from someone in my position. People in my position are the controllers of his world. If he feels that things are unfair, or unbearable then my advice is not worth anything, no matter how true and helpful it might be. Fellow inmates might help or hinder his mental health and coping skills. It depends on who he chooses to associate with.

As an outside influencer you can listen and offer advice and help. But even then it is still difficult to do so. What you or I might find insignificant might mean the whole world to someone in his situation. Especially control of your time. We can come and go as we please and go where we want. An inmate can't their whole life is controlled by hourly moves, nightly lockdowns and other prison rules, official and inmate rules. Sometimes that gets to be too much for some.

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Thank you for you answer ! Your point of view was very interesting to me, as I wondered how I could help him to react differently the next time, without sounding judgemental. I keep thinking about this, waiting for his answer to know if he wants to talk about it again, and I'll softly try to make him see some other perspectives.
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  #222  
Old 08-08-2019, 12:22 AM
Itshardtowait Itshardtowait is offline
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I have a question for you, if you know a CO is not treating the inmates fairly, and this goes on for a long period of time, do you and the other COs try to get the bad one removed? I don’t mean somebody having a bad day, I mean all the time, it’s gotta make your workplace a bad environment, or do you just ignore it? My son has Schizophrenia, he was in the hole for tobacco, this went on for months. The CO says hey Skitso you want to call your Mommy? To bad your to stupid to use the phone. My son asked for a new pencil and this same CO bit the lead off and told him he was a sharp as that pencil. The regular COs he said were nice enough, they tried to make up for the meanness of the bad CO, they gave him pencils as soon as they could, they would give him more time in the shower, and they would bring him the phone. All my son said to me was this guy had a chip on his shoulder and he’s just a bad person. He’s not in that area anymore so it’s no longer a problem for my son, but this CO does this to all the Inmates, have you ran into the situation and what did you do? or what would you yourself do?
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Old 08-09-2019, 07:53 AM
Bikerguy Bikerguy is offline
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You bring up an interesting scenario. Yes there are many COs who are generally dismissive and a$$holes towards inmates. Why is that? It could be many reasons, some yes do stem from enjoying a sort of "power" over another individual. "Power corrupts" that sort of thing. Other times, it is the daily grind of dealing with individuals who are always doing bad things and breaking the rules of the prison. Remember, just like police, we deal more with the rule breakers, than the folks who are just trying to get through their day. Because the daily grind gets to all of us, it tends to make some become very impartial and detached from any thing that might be going on. Everyone wants an exception "Hey CO can I...?" It gets to the point where the answer is generally going to be "No". Many times inmates view that as unhelpful staff, COs treating them unfairly. But from a staff point of view many times it is inmates trying to get over on the system, any way they can. It gets to the point where we view almost any request outside the norm as having an ulterior motive.

As for CO's who "stir the pot". Many times if they make a comment to an inmate, such as the example you gave with your son. It might only be done in the presence of other COs they trust would not rat them out. But supervisors know who can and can not manage a unit properly. There are CO's who do cause more harm than good while working a unit. They "poke the bear" to the point where it causes problems in the unit. They do get spoken to by supervisors to "tone it down". But unless they are doing something blatantly illegal, they usually just get shuffled around to somewhere else. An outside post, a tower, a perimeter vehicle, a checkpoint, control center. Something along those lines keep them away from inmates.

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Originally Posted by Itshardtowait View Post
I have a question for you, if you know a CO is not treating the inmates fairly, and this goes on for a long period of time, do you and the other COs try to get the bad one removed? I dont mean somebody having a bad day, I mean all the time, its gotta make your workplace a bad environment, or do you just ignore it? My son has Schizophrenia, he was in the hole for tobacco, this went on for months. The CO says hey Skitso you want to call your Mommy? To bad your to stupid to use the phone. My son asked for a new pencil and this same CO bit the lead off and told him he was a sharp as that pencil. The regular COs he said were nice enough, they tried to make up for the meanness of the bad CO, they gave him pencils as soon as they could, they would give him more time in the shower, and they would bring him the phone. All my son said to me was this guy had a chip on his shoulder and hes just a bad person. Hes not in that area anymore so its no longer a problem for my son, but this CO does this to all the Inmates, have you ran into the situation and what did you do? or what would you yourself do?
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  #224  
Old 08-09-2019, 03:24 PM
Itshardtowait Itshardtowait is offline
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Thank You for your reply, I’m glad there are good COs, I’m sorry that some cover for the others, I guess at the end of the day it’s only between you(not specifically you)and God and how you treat others
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Old 08-12-2019, 02:29 AM
CaHicks CaHicks is offline
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Originally Posted by Bikerguy View Post
You bring up an interesting scenario. Yes there are many COs who are generally dismissive and a$$holes towards inmates. Why is that? It could be many reasons, some yes do stem from enjoying a sort of "power" over another individual. "Power corrupts" that sort of thing. Other times, it is the daily grind of dealing with individuals who are always doing bad things and breaking the rules of the prison. Remember, just like police, we deal more with the rule breakers, than the folks who are just trying to get through their day. Because the daily grind gets to all of us, it tends to make some become very impartial and detached from any thing that might be going on. Everyone wants an exception "Hey CO can I...?" It gets to the point where the answer is generally going to be "No". Many times inmates view that as unhelpful staff, COs treating them unfairly. But from a staff point of view many times it is inmates trying to get over on the system, any way they can. It gets to the point where we view almost any request outside the norm as having an ulterior motive.

As for CO's who "stir the pot". Many times if they make a comment to an inmate, such as the example you gave with your son. It might only be done in the presence of other COs they trust would not rat them out. But supervisors know who can and can not manage a unit properly. There are CO's who do cause more harm than good while working a unit. They "poke the bear" to the point where it causes problems in the unit. They do get spoken to by supervisors to "tone it down". But unless they are doing something blatantly illegal, they usually just get shuffled around to somewhere else. An outside post, a tower, a perimeter vehicle, a checkpoint, control center. Something along those lines keep them away from inmates.
I have a question, I have a friend locked up in a core civic private prison in Oklahoma .... this is all new to me and apparently they are on a lockdown that happens once per year and it's some kind of institutional shakedown .... how long do those last. Its Davis Correctional Facility a 1600 bed prison
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