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Oregon Parole, Probation, Work Release, Halfway Houses & Community Service All information relating to parole, probation, halfway houses, community service and electronic monitoring in Oregon should be posted here.

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  #1  
Old 02-16-2015, 01:44 AM
sbegonia sbegonia is offline
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Default Life on Parole? Really?

I have a friend who served most of his 22 years on a life sentence at Coffield, and he was then transferred to Rosharon Ramsey before he was finally released. Since he was serving life, his parole is 'for life'. His was a double murder in cold blood case when he was 18 years old. No doubt he deserved the time, and is lucky to out of 'parole for life'. But we have been thinking about moving to Oregon and wondering if this parole will move with us 'for life' in Oregon, or if once it's moved to another state an end will finally be made to it after a prescribed period of time. Does anyone know anything about this kind of a case? Maybe I should post in the general topics and in Oregon as well. Any help from someone in the know is appreciated.
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Old 02-16-2015, 02:01 AM
sbegonia sbegonia is offline
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Default Life on Parole? Really?

My friend, whom I have known for awhile now, served 22 years on a life sentence, most of it on Coffield, and at the end on Ramsey in Rosharon in Texas. He was finally released and is not serving "life on parole".

He earned his Bachelors degree in Rosharon. He completed his Masters program at University of Houston after his release. He can't find a job for the life of him. He works for his father's real estate company on a stipend level, and barely makes his bills, asking his father for pocket money all the time.

We were together for awhile and I have seen him go through a lot of changes since he found his freedom. One thing I know would be helpful for him is to get OFF parole so he can qualify for more career options.

All the communication issues he faces, and all the drama, along with working to help him get at least 100 interviews (none of the companies hired him), I got fed up. I moved back to my place of bliss, Oregon.

He would like to follow me up here. We wonder if "life on parole" for crimes a 46 year old man committed when he was 18 would continue to be of concern for the state of Oregon ForEver. I would like to see him come up and see if things might be different. He is afraid of how the parole might differ.

Can anyone help me with my worries and questions?

Any qualified and/or knowledgeable advice is welcomed.
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Old 02-16-2015, 06:49 AM
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My understanding is that if you move to another state, the state you move to has to accept a "trade" of someone else on parole and that the length of the parole (in this case, lifetime) stays with the person moving into the state. I'm not necessarily "in the know" for certain on this, but that's my general understanding of how it works.

There are very few people truly on parole here in Oregon, as we have some draconian laws about early release.

But you never know until you try, right? As with all things related to prisons, just don't get your hopes up too high.
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Old 02-16-2015, 07:04 AM
CenTexLyn CenTexLyn is offline
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The supervision can be transferred if he meets Compact criteria. However, Oregon will have no ability to terminate the period of supervision as that is a decision that can ONLY be made by the sending State.

And, under CURRENT law, murder would not qualify for an early termination at any point in time. Making matters more difficult is that, even if the offense qualified, the sentence does not. Just as there is no ability to calculate a mandatory supervision date on a life sentence, there is no way to quantify the half-way point on a life sentence in order to determine whether half of the period has successfully been served.
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Old 02-16-2015, 07:24 AM
Real Checker Real Checker is offline
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A more realistic path, albeit still unlikely, is clemency. Perhaps with the help of a good clemency attorney (one experienced with the process) you might be able to qualify and receive some sort of conditional pardon. This would NOT restore citizenship rights, but it does leave the governor with the option to revoke the pardon if the conditions he/she sets are not met.

A commutation of sentence could produce a "number" that would give a discharge date, but that might be a waste of time since commutations are usually only considered if a sentence is proven excessive based on new evidence. Plus all the officials involved with the original conviction have to concur. Probably unlikely. If the object is just to get out from under supervision, then the conditional pardon MIGHT be a solution. I don't know ... but keep in mind there may be options other than just living out a parole.

Last edited by Real Checker; 02-16-2015 at 07:26 AM..
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Old 02-17-2015, 07:23 AM
CenTexLyn CenTexLyn is offline
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Originally Posted by Real Checker View Post
A more realistic path, albeit still unlikely, is clemency. Perhaps with the help of a good clemency attorney (one experienced with the process) you might be able to qualify and receive some sort of conditional pardon. This would NOT restore citizenship rights, but it does leave the governor with the option to revoke the pardon if the conditions he/she sets are not met.

A commutation of sentence could produce a "number" that would give a discharge date, but that might be a waste of time since commutations are usually only considered if a sentence is proven excessive based on new evidence. Plus all the officials involved with the original conviction have to concur. Probably unlikely. If the object is just to get out from under supervision, then the conditional pardon MIGHT be a solution. I don't know ... but keep in mind there may be options other than just living out a parole.
A pardon is not going to happen with that fact base nor is any governor in this State ever going to see a time cut make it past the Board.
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Old 02-20-2015, 02:06 AM
sbegonia sbegonia is offline
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Thank you for your responses.

I believe the state of Oregon will only carry out by the letter any parole agreement made in the state of Texas. This is based on my own experience with another friend who moved probation to Texas to Oregon. I know parole can be a different matter, but just thought there might be someone experienced with the law on here who could verify.

Anyone dealing with the paper trail my friend has to deal with is thinking of any possible way to get out from under it. He wants to move to any state that would terminate his parole, but in truth, clemency would be better. The record is bad enough without the parole dragging behind though.

I know Texas is not big on clemency, especially not in the kind of case my friend was involved in. There's no going back. A moments madness equals a life of torture. I can't judge anyone nor do I care to judge.

If anyone has any other advice, it's appreciated. I wanted to stop and thank those who responded so far though. <3
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Last edited by sbegonia; 02-20-2015 at 02:07 AM.. Reason: typo
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Old 02-20-2015, 05:27 AM
CenTexLyn CenTexLyn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sbegonia View Post
Thank you for your responses.

I believe the state of Oregon will only carry out by the letter any parole agreement made in the state of Texas. This is based on my own experience with another friend who moved probation to Texas to Oregon. I know parole can be a different matter, but just thought there might be someone experienced with the law on here who could verify.

Anyone dealing with the paper trail my friend has to deal with is thinking of any possible way to get out from under it. He wants to move to any state that would terminate his parole, but in truth, clemency would be better. The record is bad enough without the parole dragging behind though.

I know Texas is not big on clemency, especially not in the kind of case my friend was involved in. There's no going back. A moments madness equals a life of torture. I can't judge anyone nor do I care to judge.

If anyone has any other advice, it's appreciated. I wanted to stop and thank those who responded so far though. <3
There is NO State that can arbitrarily terminate the period of supervision mandated by a different State. In EVERY instance where another State tries to do so, I can guarantee you that Texas WILL issue a warrant for his arrest precisely because the supervision has not been terminated by Texas. Whether he is revoked or not would be dependent on a number of factors, but he WOULD be returned to Texas for the purposes of that hearing...

Oh, and Compact is not designed for people to pick and choose where the supervision might be most lenient.
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Old 02-20-2015, 07:03 AM
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To address the issue you brought up indirectly:

Yes, our system is badly broken. Laws vary wildly from state-to-state and are enforced in seemingly patchwork fashion.

My father was sentenced to 10 years. His cellie was sentenced to 35 years for crimes less severe than my fathers.

Before you consider moving to Oregon, I do suggest you google Oregon Measure 11 and read up on it. If your friend had been sentenced in Oregon, he would have a true life sentence, no possibility for parole, no possibility of early release. Ever.

Oregon is a strange mix of far left liberal and Elizabethan draconian laws. My Dad's attorney told him that had he been living 3 streets over (in a different county), he probably would have only gotten 5 years.

Moving is not necessarily going to help matters, either for your friend or for you and your friend's relationship. It would certainly be easier for you to relocated to Texas than for him to relocated to Oregon.

The system is designed by and for bureaucrats. It is not a justice system. It is a legal system. And I agree that 18-year-olds don't have the greatest judgment in the world, unfortunately our legal system says that they should be able to function at the same level as a 40 year old so the laws apply evenly.

I'm sorry for the predicament you find yourself in.
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